Range
Breeds from western and central Alaska east across north-central Canada to central Newfoundland, and south to northern Baja California in the west; in the east from central Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and the northern Great Lakes states south through New York in mountainous areas to eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina. Winters in South America from Colombia and Venezuela to Peru, and casually in southern California.

Status
Breeds from western and central Alaska east across north-central Canada to central Newfoundland, and south to northern Baja California in the west; in the east from central Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and the northern Great Lakes states south through New York in mountainous areas to eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina. Winters in South America from Colombia and Venezuela to Peru, and casually in southern California.

Breeding
The Olive-sided Flycatcher has a widespread breeding distribution across the southern portions of the province, including Vancouver Island, although it likely breeds throughout most of forested British Columbia except the Queen Charlotte Islands. Its highest numbers occur mainly on southeastern Vancouver Island, in the Georgia Depression Ecoprovince, and in the southwestern portion of the Sub-Boreal Interior Ecoprovince. It appears to be sparsely but evenly distributed elsewhere in suitable habitats.
An analysis of Breeding Bird Surveys for the period 1968 through 1993 shows that the mean number of birds on coastal and interior routes decreased at an average annual rate of 5%. Possible reasons for the decline include destruction of tropical wintering habitats, loss of suitable breeding and foraging habitats, logging activities that alter age classes of forests, and use of forest pesticides and herbicides. Breeding habitat includes the edges of semi-open mature coniferous forests and mixed woodlands, usually near water. Half of the Olive-sided Flycatcher nests were found in semi-open coniferous forests. Most of the rest were in mixed forests. Most nests were situated in coniferous trees. All of the described nests were attached to the upper surface of a horizontal branch, generally well out on the branch but occasionally near the trunk. Nests were bulky structures of interwoven twigs, sticks, and rootlets. The nest cup was lined with beard-lichens, grass, and other plant fibres. Sizes of clutches ranged from 1 to 4 eggs.
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