Passage 1: Hannah Hyland tells Rory MacKay about Stopping Places

Excerpts from interview of Hannah (McGuey) Hyland (daughter of Dennis McGuey) by Rory MacKay

“Well, there was…that salty pork, and they fried that. And they had beans in the morning. Roasted beans. And they’d make pies sometimes, sometimes not. But the main food was pork and potatoes and molasses, dessert pretty most all of the time, there was hardly anything else ever put on the table, only molasses… Oh yeah, once they got the land cleared and got the gardens going they had vegetables part time. But they never could grow enough to keep going all winter, you know. They’d have to buy…

And then [my mother] used to have 40 men sometimes, when we were kids you know, when mother was there then after my uncle left…she used to have over 40 maybe 50 men there at night… Yeah, they all had their shanties, you see, in the bush. And then Basin was a [company] stopping place, you see, be a stopping place for the lumbermen… A gang would come up to the Basin, there’d be 50 or 60 men in one gang and they’d stay at the Basin. From the Basin, then they’d go to the camps. Well, then the McIntyre place was six miles above the McGuey place and when they come that eight miles from the Basin – they’re walking, you know – it was dinner time. And then if they had to go too far, they’d stop and have supper at the McIntyre place. Or if they come out from the camp, maybe some of them stay at the McIntyre's overnight, sometimes a bunch would come into McGueys, stay there…

Yes, my father sold liquor and my uncle Bill McIntyre sold liquor…

Oh, all along the Bonnechere [River], a lot kept stopping places.… Down the Bonnechere Road towards Killaloe. It was just the one road and everybody build alongside the road…

[My mother] had a dining room, and she served the men. And after the men was all done eating, us children would go in the dining room and have our meal. We’d have practically the same as the men and because what was left from the men’s dinner, you see. The kiddies would clean it up…

She used to grow a lot of turnips and when she run out of potatoes, you had to buy potatoes by the sleighload. So go down a mile down by Wilno and somewheres and get a load of potatoes. They had the cellar under the house and they had a roothouse where you keep potatoes and stuff from freezing, you see.

Well, when I was a kid they used to get it from Eganville. They’d go down to Eganville and get a couple of sleigh loads and they’d get flour and sugar and, it was mostly brown sugar that time, and tea. They’d get sixty-pound crates of tea. Chest they called it, tea chest. Sixty pounds at a time. And flour and sugar. They’d get bags. Whatever they want and all that. But there was no canned goods…

She used to pack her butter in fifty pound tubs and sell them to the camps… We never sold anything else. Just the beef and butter…

The cost [for staying at our stopping place] was twenty-five cents, but if they were paying out of their own pocket they’d have to give mother the twenty-five cents, but if they were working for McLachlins [logging company] she’d just mark it in the book. And she got paid at the Basin. She’d send her bill to the clerk at the basin and then when he got settled the man they’d take it off and if he was paying for his own board and if McLachlins was paying for the meals she just sent the bill to McLachlins and they paid her.”


Rory MacKay, Hannah Hyland
c. 1900
Ontario, CANADA
© 1976, Algonquin Park Museum Archives. All Rights Reserved.

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