In 1736, French ironmasters introduced the Mauricie region to a technology that had been widely used in Europe for over 200 years. This technology was used to process iron ore into bar iron or cast iron. The Forges du Saint-Maurice National Historic Site brings to life the exceptional story of Canada’s first industrial community.

What was the trade of the people who work at the art of casting?
In 1736, French ironmasters introduced the Mauricie region to a technology that had been widely used in Europe for over 200 years. This technology was used to process iron ore into bar iron or cast iron. The Forges du Saint-Maurice National Historic Site brings to life the exceptional story of Canada’s first industrial community.

What was the trade of the people who work at the art of casting?

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

French Ironmasters

Diderot et d'Alembert, Encyclopédie...
The Forges du Saint-Maurice National Historic Site

© The Forges du Saint-Maurice National Historic Site


Adjacent to the blast furnace was the casting house, where a group of skilled workers, called moulders, went about their tasks. In their time, moulders were considered to be genuine artists, and the success of the company very much depended on them.

These workers first fabricated the models that were used to reproduce all the objects eventually cast in the sand. They then set up the moulds and cast a series of products that were highly valued on account of their exceptional resistance and fine craftsmanship.

Moreover, the company made a point of informing its customers that:

"[...] Owing to the skilled, experienced workers he (Mathew Bell, lessee) selected during his travels to England, the beauty of the work has been greatly increased, particularly the hollow ware, which, for its lightness and elegance, is the equal of similar articles manufactured in Great Britain."

Quebec Gazette, January 27, 1820.
Adjacent to the blast furnace was the casting house, where a group of skilled workers, called moulders, went about their tasks. In their time, moulders were considered to be genuine artists, and the success of the company very much depended on them.

These workers first fabricated the models that were used to reproduce all the objects eventually cast in the sand. They then set up the moulds and cast a series of products that were highly valued on account of their exceptional resistance and fine craftsmanship.

Moreover, the company made a point of informing its customers that:

"[...] Owing to the skilled, experienced workers he (Mathew Bell, lessee) selected during his travels to England, the beauty of the work has been greatly increased, particularly the hollow ware, which, for its lightness and elegance, is the equal of similar articles manufactured in Great Britain."

Quebec Gazette, January 27, 1820.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

The trade of the people who work at the art of casting is:

1. Smelters
2. Moulders
3. Blacksmiths
The trade of the people who work at the art of casting is:

1. Smelters
2. Moulders
3. Blacksmiths

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

The Canadian Museum of Civilization features a collection comprised of nearly 3.75 million objects from Canada and all around the world. It allows us to discover the diversity of the many cultures on our planet. The museum has developed an exhibition on musical instruments in collaboration with several Francophone museums from around the world.

What is a "balafon"?
The Canadian Museum of Civilization features a collection comprised of nearly 3.75 million objects from Canada and all around the world. It allows us to discover the diversity of the many cultures on our planet. The museum has developed an exhibition on musical instruments in collaboration with several Francophone museums from around the world.

What is a "balafon"?

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Balafon

Canadian Museum of Civilization

© Canadian Museum of Civilization


Balafons are found only on the African continent where they developed without outside influence.

The balafon is an idiophone. It is very much like its ancestor, the xylophone, but under its wooden planks, small gourds are used as resonators, giving it a very soft sound. It has a wood and rope frame and is played like a xylophone, with two rubber-tipped sticks.

The balafon is an ancient fetish instrument that was mainly used by African warriors. Today, however, the balafon is not linked to a religion as such but is mainly used for entertainment (dances) or for ceremonies. Balafons are usually played during celebrations by professionals rarely by amateurs.
Balafons are found only on the African continent where they developed without outside influence.

The balafon is an idiophone. It is very much like its ancestor, the xylophone, but under its wooden planks, small gourds are used as resonators, giving it a very soft sound. It has a wood and rope frame and is played like a xylophone, with two rubber-tipped sticks.

The balafon is an ancient fetish instrument that was mainly used by African warriors. Today, however, the balafon is not linked to a religion as such but is mainly used for entertainment (dances) or for ceremonies. Balafons are usually played during celebrations by professionals rarely by amateurs.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

A balafon is:

1. A bombard
2. A small African xylophone
3. A hurdy-gurdy
A balafon is:

1. A bombard
2. A small African xylophone
3. A hurdy-gurdy

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Forges du Saint-Maurice National Historic Site
The trade of the people who work at the art of casting is:
2. Moulders

Canadian Museum of Civilization
A balafon is:
2. A small African xylophone

Forges du Saint-Maurice National Historic Site
The trade of the people who work at the art of casting is:
2. Moulders

Canadian Museum of Civilization
A balafon is:
2. A small African xylophone

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Relate intriguing facts about Francophone Canada
  • Increase their interest in Canadian history and culture
  • Gain an appreciation for the variety of museums in Canada

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