Household Consumption of Electricity

In the home, electricity is available immediately. From the line on the pole, it leaves the network and enters the home through the electrical distribution panel to arrive at the device or appliance that you need.  But each time you operate an appliance, you use electricity... and the meter turns! Do you know which appliances consume the most electricity? Let us enter the home…

Concept Animation

Here is an illustration of energy consumption in the home showing a telephone pole and a home connected by an electric line. On the side of the house the electric meter is clearly visible.  In the basement, one can see the electrical distribution panel, but it is less evident. From this panel, lines symbolize electricity being fed to different devices and appliances in the home. The home is shown in cross-section to be able to see its occupants and the main reasons electricity is used.  For example: Read More
Household Consumption of Electricity

In the home, electricity is available immediately. From the line on the pole, it leaves the network and enters the home through the electrical distribution panel to arrive at the device or appliance that you need.  But each time you operate an appliance, you use electricity... and the meter turns! Do you know which appliances consume the most electricity? Let us enter the home…

Concept Animation

Here is an illustration of energy consumption in the home showing a telephone pole and a home connected by an electric line. On the side of the house the electric meter is clearly visible.  In the basement, one can see the electrical distribution panel, but it is less evident. From this panel, lines symbolize electricity being fed to different devices and appliances in the home. The home is shown in cross-section to be able to see its occupants and the main reasons electricity is used.  For example:

heating:
A man adjusts the heating thermostat in a room;

hot water:
A woman bathes a young child;

appliances:
A boy views a cooking pie through the window in the oven door; a teenager puts clothing in the clothes dryer;

lighting: 
A grandmother knits by the light of a table lamp in the living room;

other less important sources of use: computer (a teenager), television (the grandfather), vacuum cleaner (a man), electric lawnmower (a woman)

Detail

Heating
Heating in the home is the main cost of electricity. It accounts for 54% of the electricity bill paid by your parents.

Image Description
A man adjusting the thermostat in the dining room. Moving the curser over the thermostat activates the meter, which appears in close-up or in the foreground. An explanation appears.

Energy-saving tip: Lower the thermostat in your room to 17°C at night.

Hot Water
Heating water is the second highest cost of electricity in the home: about 20% of the bill.

Energy-saving tip: Take a quick shower instead of a bath.

Image description
A woman bathing a young child (± age two). Moving the curser over the bathtub causes the meter to turn (close-up or foreground). An explanation appears.

Appliances
Appliances consume about 18% of the electricity used in the home. Of course there is the stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, washing machine and clothes dryer. But one should not underestimate the electric kettle, microwave oven or the air conditioning unit. To be used with discretion!  

Energy-saving tip: Do not use the drying cycle on the dishwasher.

Image description
A boy viewing a cooking pie through the window in the oven door. A teenager puts two or three articles of clothing in the clothes dryer. When the curser is positioned over the stove or dryer, the meter begins to turn (close-up or foreground). An explanation appears.

Lighting
Lighting accounts for a mere 5% of the cost of electricity in the home.

Energy-saving tip: Turn off the light when you leave a room.

Image description
An elderly person (we presume she is the grandmother) sitting in the living room knitting by the light of a table lamp. When the curser is positioned over the lamp, the meter begins to turn (close-up or foreground). An explanation appears.

Other Uses
Several small electrical appliances account for some 3% of the cost of electricity in the home.

Image description
A teenager using a computer in his room. An older man (we presume he is the grandfather) is watching television in the living room. A teenager is drying her hair in the bathroom.

© 2010, Cité de l'Énergie. All Rights Reserved.

Illustration of a section of a house with all visible parts

Household Consumption of Electricity In the home, electricity is available immediately. From the line on the pole, it leaves the network and enters the home through the electrical distribution panel to arrive at the device or appliance that you need. But each time you operate an appliance, you use electricity... and the meter turns! Do you know which appliances consume the most electricity?

Cité de l'énergie
Hamon-Bienvenue.ca

© 2010, Cité de l'Énergie. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

In all six modules, the objectives are related to skill levels of science, technology and history adapted to Cycle One in the public school system.

Skill levels include:

Finding answers and solutions to scientific and technological problems;
Building on personal scientific and technological knowledge;
Communicating in language used in science and technology.

Questioning social realities from a historical perspective;
Interpreting social realities using the historical method;
Building citizenship awareness through history.

Learning about the world of technology heightens student awareness of technology as an integral part of the world around us. The study of engineering concepts serves to provide the student with tools to design and create a technical prototype. By studying mechanisms from the standpoint of forces, movement and the transformation of energy, the student will understand how certain technology systems work. 

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