You can help the Aquarium’s researchers fight crime! If you’re on the coast of British Columbia and you see someone fishing next to a No Fishing sign, call the number on the sign (1-800-465-4336). The government needs to catch the poacher in the act, so it’s important to call right away.

If you can’t stay, take a photograph or videotape the poacher. Be sure to get his or her face! If the poacher is in a boat, try getting a picture of its name and license number. It’s best to get a series of photographs showing the poacher, the boat, and the location (with some sort of landmark). That way, there’s proof that the poacher was really fishing in a no fishing zone.
You can help the Aquarium’s researchers fight crime! If you’re on the coast of British Columbia and you see someone fishing next to a No Fishing sign, call the number on the sign (1-800-465-4336). The government needs to catch the poacher in the act, so it’s important to call right away.

If you can’t stay, take a photograph or videotape the poacher. Be sure to get his or her face! If the poacher is in a boat, try getting a picture of its name and license number. It’s best to get a series of photographs showing the poacher, the boat, and the location (with some sort of landmark). That way, there’s proof that the poacher was really fishing in a no fishing zone.

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

Poaching is a serious crime, and it can be expensive too. In fact, the total court fines for fishing violaations exceeds those for drug fines.
Poaching is a serious crime, and it can be expensive too. In fact, the total court fines for fishing violaations exceeds those for drug fines.

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

A poacher fishing next to a 'Fishing Closure' sign

Photo : B.P. Handy

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.


Want to count rockfish with our rockfish experts? Join the Vancouver Aquarium’s survey team! At the moment, volunteer divers in B.C. can start by helping us count lingcod egg masses.

Neither cods nor linguists

Lingcod like to live in the same places as rockfish. Their population has gone way down due to overfishing, and now it’s illegal to fish for them in parts of British Columbia. The females lay eggs in big clumps, called egg masses, that look like styrofoam. It's easy to find out the age of young female lingcod by the size of their egg masses.

Size DOES matter

Grapefruit-sized egg masses mean that the female is probably 3 years old. A 4 year old female lays an egg mass about the size of a cantaloupe, and a female that’s 5 years or older can lay an egg mass that’s the size of a watermelon.

Researchers use the age of the females to figure out if the lingcod are still being fished in places where they’re supposed to be protected.
Want to count rockfish with our rockfish experts? Join the Vancouver Aquarium’s survey team! At the moment, volunteer divers in B.C. can start by helping us count lingcod egg masses.

Neither cods nor linguists

Lingcod like to live in the same places as rockfish. Their population has gone way down due to overfishing, and now it’s illegal to fish for them in parts of British Columbia. The females lay eggs in big clumps, called egg masses, that look like styrofoam. It's easy to find out the age of young female lingcod by the size of their egg masses.

Size DOES matter

Grapefruit-sized egg masses mean that the female is probably 3 years old. A 4 year old female lays an egg mass about the size of a cantaloupe, and a female that’s 5 years or older can lay an egg mass that’s the size of a watermelon.

Researchers use the age of the females to figure out if the lingcod are still being fished in places where they’re supposed to be protected.

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

A lingcod guarding an egg mass

Photo: P. Edgell

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.


Near Port Hardy, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island, female lingcod can live to be 12-15 years old and lay egg masses as big as garbage cans!
Near Port Hardy, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island, female lingcod can live to be 12-15 years old and lay egg masses as big as garbage cans!

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

Want to help rockfish populations recover? Don’t eat them! But that’s easier said than done. Rockfish usually show up on our dinner plates under a different name. Yelloweye rockfish is commonly called red snapper, and rockfish often show up on menus as rock cod or Pacific snapper. The next time you go to a restaurant and you're hungry for “snapper”, ask the server if it's B.C. rockfish.

If you’re going to a seafood restaurant in Vancouver, you can go to the Vancouver Aquarium’s Ocean Wise website. You’ll find a list of awesome restaurants that have promised to serve ocean-friendly seafood.
Want to help rockfish populations recover? Don’t eat them! But that’s easier said than done. Rockfish usually show up on our dinner plates under a different name. Yelloweye rockfish is commonly called red snapper, and rockfish often show up on menus as rock cod or Pacific snapper. The next time you go to a restaurant and you're hungry for “snapper”, ask the server if it's B.C. rockfish.

If you’re going to a seafood restaurant in Vancouver, you can go to the Vancouver Aquarium’s Ocean Wise website. You’ll find a list of awesome restaurants that have promised to serve ocean-friendly seafood.

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

Did you know a lot of seafood is actually called by different names in restaurants?

Common Name

Restaurant Name

Yelloweye rockfish

Red snapper

Other rockfish

Rock cod

Patagonian toothfish

Chilean sea bass

Anglerfish

Monkfish

Atlantic c Read More

Did you know a lot of seafood is actually called by different names in restaurants?

Common Name

Restaurant Name

Yelloweye rockfish

Red snapper

Other rockfish

Rock cod

Patagonian toothfish

Chilean sea bass

Anglerfish

Monkfish

Atlantic cod

Whitefish

Skates

Raja or imitation scallops


© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

A variety of fresh seafood on ice

Photo: H. Attie
Courtesy of C restaurant

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.


A tasty seafood appetizer

Photo: H. Attie
Courtesy of C restaurant

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • familiarize himself with the vocabulary used in biology;
  • assess human impacts on biodiversity, and identify ways of preserving biodiversity;
  • describe how personal actions help conserve natural resources and protect the environment in their region;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic nature of ecosystems.

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