The hard work that leads to the realization of a great dream is, in itself, its own reward. The Canadian and Quebec governments have shown their appreciation for the Institute’s services to the population, by awarding to Dr. Frappier their highest awards. Six universities (of Montreal, Laval, McGill, Quebec, Paris, and Krakow) have given him honorary doctorates. Several science academies and medical associations have given him medals and honorary diplomas; he is one of the rare foreigners to have received the Jean-Toy award from the Académie des Sciences de l’Institut de France.
The hard work that leads to the realization of a great dream is, in itself, its own reward. The Canadian and Quebec governments have shown their appreciation for the Institute’s services to the population, by awarding to Dr. Frappier their highest awards. Six universities (of Montreal, Laval, McGill, Quebec, Paris, and Krakow) have given him honorary doctorates. Several science academies and medical associations have given him medals and honorary diplomas; he is one of the rare foreigners to have received the Jean-Toy award from the Académie des Sciences de l’Institut de France.

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Officer of the Order of the British Empire

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


During World War II, the Institute contributed to setting up blood donor clinics for the Red Cross in the province of Quebec. Dr. Frappier managed the human serum desiccation laboratories at the institute he directed. Human serum, which was desiccated and bottled, was labeled with the names of the Red Cross and of the Institute. This serum was distributed to armies all over the world. After the war, he received the OBE (Order of the British Empire) for services rendered. This medal, the highest distinction of the Order, was awarded to Dr. Frappier in 1946 by King George VI, in recognition of his war effort.

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This medal was created by King George V during the First World War to recognize the services rendered to the war effort by civilians and military personnel assigned to auxiliary functions. During the war of 1939-1945, the Institute provided services to the armed forces by analyzing the effect of certain textiles on the development of gas gangrene caused by anaerobic bacteria. Beginning in 1941, the Institute moved into the unfinished building at the Université de Montréal in order Read More

During World War II, the Institute contributed to setting up blood donor clinics for the Red Cross in the province of Quebec. Dr. Frappier managed the human serum desiccation laboratories at the institute he directed. Human serum, which was desiccated and bottled, was labeled with the names of the Red Cross and of the Institute. This serum was distributed to armies all over the world. After the war, he received the OBE (Order of the British Empire) for services rendered. This medal, the highest distinction of the Order, was awarded to Dr. Frappier in 1946 by King George VI, in recognition of his war effort.

For more information

This medal was created by King George V during the First World War to recognize the services rendered to the war effort by civilians and military personnel assigned to auxiliary functions. During the war of 1939-1945, the Institute provided services to the armed forces by analyzing the effect of certain textiles on the development of gas gangrene caused by anaerobic bacteria. Beginning in 1941, the Institute moved into the unfinished building at the Université de Montréal in order to provide vaccines, serums, and other products (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, anti- typhoid and anti-smallpox vaccines, serum and freeze-dried blood) to the Canadian and allied armies. The rapid scientific and technological developments required because of the war enhanced the reputation of the Institute’s researchers. Furthermore, the Institute became a respected provider of vaccines and biological products in Quebec and in Canada. This, in turn, ensured that funding was sufficient to allow the Institute to develop.


© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Medal signed by H. Dubois commemorating the 50th anniversary of the death of Louis Pasteur in 1945. This medal was awarded to Dr. Armand Frappier when he represented Canada at the International Congress of Pasteurian Sciences in 1946. The Congress took place in Paris, Dôle, and Arbois, three cities that Pasteur visited throughout his career. Dr. Frappier was one of the first Canadians to visit France after the Second World War.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Medal of the Officier d'Académie de France

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


This medal of the Officier d'Académie de France was awarded to Dr. Frappier in 1951 for services rendered to the French cause by the Ministère de l'Éducation Nationale de la République française.

In a transcription of a speech by Dr. Albert Jutras, who was a medical student with Dr. Frappier, to the St-Laurent Kiwanas Club on June 17, 1964, in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Institute, one can read, on page 2: "At the crossroads of medical trends, I remember us receiving together, with worried looks and trembling hands, the Palmes Académiques that France bestowed upon us in 1951."

This medal of the Officier d'Académie de France was awarded to Dr. Frappier in 1951 for services rendered to the French cause by the Ministère de l'Éducation Nationale de la République française.

In a transcription of a speech by Dr. Albert Jutras, who was a medical student with Dr. Frappier, to the St-Laurent Kiwanas Club on June 17, 1964, in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Institute, one can read, on page 2: "At the crossroads of medical trends, I remember us receiving together, with worried looks and trembling hands, the Palmes Académiques that France bestowed upon us in 1951."


© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Medal of the Association canadienne-française pour l'avancement des sciences

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


This medal was a tribute to Dr. Armand Frappier from the Association canadienne-française pour l’avancement des sciences (ACFAS). The medal, bearing the effigy of Urgel Eugène Archambault, the first principal of the École Polytechnique de Montréal, was awarded to him in 1954. The ACFAS was founded in 1923 by the country’s first francophone scientists, notably Mgr Vincent Piette, the president of the Université de Montréal, brother Marie-Victorin, Doctors Léo Pariseau, Arthur Bernier, and Édouard Asselin, the economist Édouard Montpetit, the Société de Biologie de Montréal, etc. Today, the ACFAS is known as the Association francophone pour le savoir.
This medal was a tribute to Dr. Armand Frappier from the Association canadienne-française pour l’avancement des sciences (ACFAS). The medal, bearing the effigy of Urgel Eugène Archambault, the first principal of the École Polytechnique de Montréal, was awarded to him in 1954. The ACFAS was founded in 1923 by the country’s first francophone scientists, notably Mgr Vincent Piette, the president of the Université de Montréal, brother Marie-Victorin, Doctors Léo Pariseau, Arthur Bernier, and Édouard Asselin, the economist Édouard Montpetit, the Société de Biologie de Montréal, etc. Today, the ACFAS is known as the Association francophone pour le savoir.

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

The medal of the Académie nationale de médecine de France awarded to Dr. Frappier in 1957, when he was nominated as foreign correspondent member in replacement of Sir A. Fleming, deceased. Dr. Fleming, who discovered penicillin, visited the Institut de microbiologie et d'hygiène de l'Université de Montréal, founded by Dr. Armand Frappier, on July 10, 1945.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Medal signed P. Turin commemorating the centennial of the birth of professor Albert Calmette (1863-1933), co-discoverer of the BCG vaccine with professor Camille Guérin at the Institut Pasteur de Paris. This medal was offered to Dr. Armand Frappier in 1963 when he was a guest of the French government for the third time since 1945, in order to take part in the festivities surrounding this event.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Plaque offered to Dr. Armand Frappier when he received a honoris causa doctoral degree from the Université de Paris in 1964.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Medal of the Centennial of the Canadian Confederation awarded to Dr. Armand Frappier, by the government of Canada on July 1, 1967.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


October 28, 1969: Dr. Frappier received Canada’s highest decoration: the Companion of the Order of Canada for services rendered to his country and to humanity.



The ribbon of the Companion of the Order of Canada, the country’s highest decoration, was awarded to Dr. Frappier by His Excellency, Roland Michener, Governor General of Canada, on October 28, 1969, for his research in microbiology.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Gown offered to Dr. Armand Frappier when he received a honoris causa doctoral degree from Université Laval on June 5, 1971.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Awarded to Dr. Armand Frappier by Monseigneur P. Caza in 1972.

Quote: We are offering you this medal in appreciation of the universally recognized scientific work you have accomplishing since the founding of your institute in 1938. Our Society would also like to underline the exceptional honor that was bestowed upon you last December when the Jean Toy prize was awarded to you by the Académie des Sciences de l'Institut de France.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Prairie des Vins d'Arbois medal awarded to Dr. Armand Frappier during the festivities surrounding the 150th anniversary of the birth of Pasteur, at the Grange Grillard estate, during an evening in honor of the directors of research institutes the world over, after their visit to Dole and Arbois, where Louis Pasteur was born and raised. The celebration was held on May 5, 1973.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • familiarize himself with the vocabulary used in microbiology;
  • explain the relationship between developments in imaging technology and the current understanding of the cell;
  • identify which microorganisms are infectious, how the immune system fights against them, and the reinforcements of modern medicine;
  • describe the benefits of microorganisms.

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