Catfish

The whiskers of redtailed catfish and tiger shovelnose catfish are very important sensory organs. They help the fish locate their prey.
Left: Redtailed Catfish
Right: Tiger Shovelnose Catfish

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Yellow Anaconda

Snakes continuously flick their tongues back and forth, allowing them to “smell.” Their tongues collect air molecules and carry them to what is called a Jacobson’s organ, which analyzes them.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Jacobson’s Organ

Jacobson’s Organ

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Yellow Anaconda

Scientists think that by collecting this information from two different points, snakes can tell which way their prey is heading. They can also smell with their nostrils.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Piranhas and Tetras

Red-bellied piranhas and cardinal tetras live in schools.

They are well adapted to their dimly lit environments. The sun’s rays penetrate down through the water and reflect off the specialized cells on their skin, so that they can recognize their companions by their colours.
Left: Red-bellied Piranhas
Right: Cardinal Tetras

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Capybara

The eyes and nostrils of animals that spend lots of time in the water, like capybaras, are often located on the top of their heads. They can see and breathe while keeping most of their bodies underwater.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Yacare Caimans’ Eye

Yacare caimans’ eyes are covered with a transparent membrane that helps protect them while they are underwater.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Learn more about the ecosystems in the Americas;
  • Observe the diversity that each ecosystem offers regarding the flora, fauna as well as climate;
  • Identify the elements that shape different ecosystems, such as vegetation, wildlife, soil, etc.;
  • Develop different causes and consequences of human actions on ecosystems (from grade 4);
  • Formulate and justify possible solutions on issues, such as global warming, in order to preserve our ecosystems and biodiversity on Earth (from grade 6).

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