Joannie Rochette had dreams of Olympic Gold in figure skating. Her mother suddenly passed away two days before she was to skate for Canada in the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Amidst this tragic event, she skated and won a Bronze medal. In this, she became a Canadian sports hero by defying the impact of tragic loss and succeeding in a dream. This story exemplifies how we define a hero. There are many ways to define what a hero is. Each athlete that becomes a hero has a unique story. This section will focus on our aquatic heroes of the past, Mark Tewksbury, Alex Baumann, Irene Strong, Cindy Nicholas and Graham Smith.

Performance Tasks

Choose one of the following:

1. Using the pictures and/or video, create a Prezi presentation centering on why one of these competitive swimmers deserves to be called a ‘hero’. Less time is required to complete this task if you know how to use this softwar Read More
Joannie Rochette had dreams of Olympic Gold in figure skating. Her mother suddenly passed away two days before she was to skate for Canada in the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Amidst this tragic event, she skated and won a Bronze medal. In this, she became a Canadian sports hero by defying the impact of tragic loss and succeeding in a dream. This story exemplifies how we define a hero. There are many ways to define what a hero is. Each athlete that becomes a hero has a unique story. This section will focus on our aquatic heroes of the past, Mark Tewksbury, Alex Baumann, Irene Strong, Cindy Nicholas and Graham Smith.

Performance Tasks

Choose one of the following:

1. Using the pictures and/or video, create a Prezi presentation centering on why one of these competitive swimmers deserves to be called a ‘hero’. Less time is required to complete this task if you know how to use this software program.

2. On a piece of blank paper and using one of the above swimmers, create a collage of pictures which would graphically describe why this swimmer is a hero. On the backside, of the paper, describe in paragraph form your choices in pictures and why your choice is a Canadian hero. The collage must contain the images on the Teacher’s Centre plus others found on the internet. (i.e. Google Images, sportshall.ca)

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

1992 - Feature Story
The finish wall was fast approaching and Calgary’s Mark Tewksbury knew he still had work to do. The 24-year-old backstroker had arrived at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona ranked fourth in the world in the 100m backstroke. He was a relay Silver medalist from the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, a double Silver medalist from the 1991 World Aquatics Championships at Perth and Silver medalist at the 1991 Pan-Pacific Swimming Championships in Edmonton. Tewksbury was clearly a contender, but was not known for his strong race starts. At the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, he thrilled the crowd at the outdoor Olympic pool, rallying in the latter stages of the 100m backstroke final, to draw even with race leader and world record holder Jeff Rouse of the United States, just five metres from the finish. Two strokes later the race was over, but who won? The results board flashed Canada’s Tewksbury won the Gold medal in an Olympic record time of 53.98 seconds, just .06 ahead of America’s Rouse.
1992 - Feature Story
The finish wall was fast approaching and Calgary’s Mark Tewksbury knew he still had work to do. The 24-year-old backstroker had arrived at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona ranked fourth in the world in the 100m backstroke. He was a relay Silver medalist from the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, a double Silver medalist from the 1991 World Aquatics Championships at Perth and Silver medalist at the 1991 Pan-Pacific Swimming Championships in Edmonton. Tewksbury was clearly a contender, but was not known for his strong race starts. At the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, he thrilled the crowd at the outdoor Olympic pool, rallying in the latter stages of the 100m backstroke final, to draw even with race leader and world record holder Jeff Rouse of the United States, just five metres from the finish. Two strokes later the race was over, but who won? The results board flashed Canada’s Tewksbury won the Gold medal in an Olympic record time of 53.98 seconds, just .06 ahead of America’s Rouse.

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Mark Tewksbury’s Gold medal winning race in the 100m backstroke at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona

Mark Tewksbury swimming to Gold in the 100m backstroke at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona.

Hans Deryk
1992-07-30
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Plaque presented to Mark Tewksbury

Plaque presented to Mark Tewksbury in recognition of his World record in the 100m backstroke.

Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum
1990-03-01
© 2012, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Plaque awarded to Mark Tewksbury

Plaque presented to Mark Tewksbury in recognition of his Gold medals in the 100m backstroke and the 4x100 medley relay at the Commonwealth Games.

Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum
c. 1990
© 2012, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Silver medal won by Mark Tewksbury in the 100m backstroke

Silver medal won by Mark Tewksbury in the 100m backstroke at the World Aquatics Championships in Perth, Australia.

Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum
c. 1991
© 2012, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Mark Tewksbury’s swimsuit

Swimsuit worn by Mark Tewksbury during his 100m backstroke Gold medal win at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona.

Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum
c. 1992
© 2012, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Mark Tewksbury Video

Mark Tewksbury discusses his Silver medal in the 100m backstroke at the 1991 World Aquatics Championship in Australia. Tewksbury hires coach Debbie Muir to help him reduce his time for the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. He discusses his race day nerves, his surprise to win Olympic Gold, and being an amateur athlete winning the Lionel Conacher Award.

(Mark Tewksbury) About 18 months before the Olympics I seemed to be a fingernail away from my dream. I was six one-hundredths of a second behind the World Record Holder Jeff Rouse at the World Championships in Australia. About six months later he smashed the World Record. He dropped 1.2 seconds from that time that we had swam at the World Championships. I’d been thinking 55:1, 54:9 where I think the World Record would be is has been demolished. So I had to absolutely go back to zero, even in terms of what was possible. Not just for me but for a human being to swim a hundred metre backstroke.

(Stadium Announcers) Representing Canada, Mark Tewksbury.

(Mark Tewksbury) I happened to run into one of the world’s greatest underwater technical experts, Debbie Muir, she saw that 30% of my race was swam under water, 50 metres off the start, 50 metres off the turn. I was spending probably less than 1% of my training time on that. And so just from pure mathematics she started to see okay, if I start to bring you some of that expertise to the area you’ve done nothing in, 30% of your race is a lot of room to improve. And so that started the hope.

(Announcer) There’s a lot of Canadian fans here tonight cheering on Mark Tewksbury but also a strong American contingent is cheering for their World-Record Holder, Jeff Rouse.

(Mark Tewksbury) I was terrified of Jeff Rouse. I’d never spoken to him in my whole life. I had to have a complete mental program just for dealing with Jeff at the Olympics.

(Announcer) Jeff Rouse has a phenomenal start in lane four, Mark will be behind and have to play catch up.

(Mark Tewksbury) Everything that day felt right, everything. The very last test to get to this stadium for my final, I got on a bus and it was 90% the American swimming team who are my two major competitors in the final. And myself and my team manager and all our Canada gear walking up the aisle with everyone turning and looking at us and pretending not to, you know and just thinking I can’t turn around and get off this bus.

(Announcers) … he touches in second place, he’s ahead of the other American. A little bit weak off the turn there as you noticed. Again Rouse has phenomenal turning ability. He’s out in front. Mark has to play catch up again, but he’s good at that, he’s got to pick it up right now. Here we are 25 metres left, the men’s 100 metre backstroke. It is between Rouse and Tewksbury. Here comes Mark Tewksbury to the final 5 metres. Rouse and Tewksbury, it’s going to go to the wall, and on the wall, …..Tewksbury! He’s done it. Olympic record.

(Mark Tewksbury) It’s just a natural reaction to see your name blink first it meant I’d won a race. Then the shock came because it was when I sort of landed on the lane rope that I realized, oh my God I won the race, like this is the Olympics. This is the dream.

I remember exactly where I was when I got the call about the Lionel Conacher Award. I remember being struck because it was the Canadian Press that tends to cover more professional sports. I believe it was Mario Lemieux in those days that was the superstar hockey player, but I thought, really nice honour for an amateur athlete, a swimmer to be awarded this very prestigious award over some of the professional athletes.

Creator: Bruce Weir

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1984 - Feature Story
Someone had to do something extraordinary to supplant Wayne Gretzky and his Stanley Cup win to take top male athlete honours in 1984. Lanky Sudbury swimmer Alex Baumann proved more than up to the task. In 1981, the then 17-year-old Baumann set a world record in the 200m individual medley. Three years later, despite nagging shoulder problems, Baumann arrived at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles as a world record holder and Gold medal contender in both the 200m and 400m individual medleys. He led the Canadian team as the Opening Ceremony flag bearer, and also proved a great leader in the pool. Baumann rewrote his world record in the 400m individual medley, becoming the first Canadian to win an Olympic Gold medal in swimming since George Hodgson at the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. He then broke his world record in the 200m individual medley for a second Gold medal. Baumann was later proclaimed Male Swimmer of the Year by Swimming World Magazine.

1984 - Feature Story
Someone had to do something extraordinary to supplant Wayne Gretzky and his Stanley Cup win to take top male athlete honours in 1984. Lanky Sudbury swimmer Alex Baumann proved more than up to the task. In 1981, the then 17-year-old Baumann set a world record in the 200m individual medley. Three years later, despite nagging shoulder problems, Baumann arrived at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles as a world record holder and Gold medal contender in both the 200m and 400m individual medleys. He led the Canadian team as the Opening Ceremony flag bearer, and also proved a great leader in the pool. Baumann rewrote his world record in the 400m individual medley, becoming the first Canadian to win an Olympic Gold medal in swimming since George Hodgson at the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. He then broke his world record in the 200m individual medley for a second Gold medal. Baumann was later proclaimed Male Swimmer of the Year by Swimming World Magazine.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Alex Baumann carrying the Canadian flag

Alex Baumann carries the Canadian flag during the opening ceremonies at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

Dave Buston
1984-07-29
© 2012, CP Archive Photo. All Rights Reserved.


Alex Baumann celebrating his Gold medal

Alex Baumann celebrating his Gold medal at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1984
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Alex Baumann celebrates in the pool

Alex Baumann wearing his swimming cap and goggles.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1980’s
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Photograph of Alex Baumann

Portrait of Alex Baumann.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1980’s
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Gold medal won by Alex Baumann

Gold medal won by Alex Baumann in the 400m individual medley at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1984
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Alex Baumann Video

Alex Baumann first explains his swimming goals at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. He discusses the pressures and the challenges of swimming the 400m individual medley, and the important relationship he had with his coach. When Baumann won Olympic Gold, he recalls his relief, and the difficulty of performing his best at the Olympic Games.

Well certainly I mean I think the, the first goal was to win and the second goal, because there was an Eastern Block boycott was to get the World Record as well because ultimately we wanted to prove that nobody could have beaten us even if the Eastern Block had been there. But as you know I mean if you set a world record in the heat nobody remembers that, it’s the Gold medal. So the world record was a secondary goal but certainly wasn’t that important.

I do recall the tremendous pressure though involved with particularly the first race, the 400 individual medley because I had both World Records going into the competition and I felt that I could only equal everybody’s expectation and that was pretty difficult. And then you start worrying about well what are people going to think and now that I’ve been at the Opening Ceremonies and carried the flag you know everybody knows me and if I screw up after 11 long years. So that was quite difficult. I still remember the heat and qualifying first and setting an Olympic Record but being about five seconds off my best time, and then trying to have something to eat and getting a nap, and I just couldn’t sleep. It was, it was very difficult because it felt like my heart was pounding so hard it was moving the whole bed. And you know that’s when I said oh this is ridiculous. I can’t worry about things I cannot control, I’m physically ready, I’m psychologically ready and just go in there and do it.

Four hundred is certainly a more strategic race and if you don’t swim according to your plan then you can screw it up significantly, and if you go too fast and you don’t have anything left for the last one hundred. But that’s what I think the partnership with the coach is, that day in and day out you practice the strategy and you follow that strategy. I think the other good thing that we did was we competed against every competitor in that year. So we went around the world competing against these guys so I wouldn’t have any new competition, I knew exactly how the swimmers swam, I wouldn’t get surprised if somebody went out two or three seconds ahead of me. I think that gave me the confidence to really stick to that plan. And I still remember the last five metres that it really wasn’t a sense of elation, it was a sense of relief that it was finally over.

Eleven years of training very, very hard and you know for that moment for everything to come together it’s pretty rare. And I think you know that’s really what makes the Olympics special. You have to perform on demand and you have to perform on that day and you see so many examples where athletes can’t perform on the day.

Creator: Bruce Weir

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1949 - FEATURE STORY
Vancouver swimmer Irene Strong had always been one of Canada’s best female athletes, but her achievements were overshadowed by the country’s preoccupation with World and Olympic figure skating champion Barbara Ann Scott. In 1946, Strong had been presented with the Women’s Amateur Athletic Federation of Canada’s prestigious Rose Bowl trophy for setting 12 Canadian swim records that year. Strong went on to compete for Canada at the 1948 Olympic Games in London. In 1949, with Scott retired, Strong was recognized for her athletic prowess as Canada’s top female athlete. During that year her achievements included breaking her national breaststroke record in the 100 yards by 14 seconds. Strong also won the 100 yard and 200 yard breaststroke event in record time and the 100 yard backstroke final at the British Empire Games team trials in Vancouver. When 20-year-old Strong was selected as Canada’s top female athlete for 1949, she was reported as holding 19 national swimming records.

1949 - FEATURE STORY
Vancouver swimmer Irene Strong had always been one of Canada’s best female athletes, but her achievements were overshadowed by the country’s preoccupation with World and Olympic figure skating champion Barbara Ann Scott. In 1946, Strong had been presented with the Women’s Amateur Athletic Federation of Canada’s prestigious Rose Bowl trophy for setting 12 Canadian swim records that year. Strong went on to compete for Canada at the 1948 Olympic Games in London. In 1949, with Scott retired, Strong was recognized for her athletic prowess as Canada’s top female athlete. During that year her achievements included breaking her national breaststroke record in the 100 yards by 14 seconds. Strong also won the 100 yard and 200 yard breaststroke event in record time and the 100 yard backstroke final at the British Empire Games team trials in Vancouver. When 20-year-old Strong was selected as Canada’s top female athlete for 1949, she was reported as holding 19 national swimming records.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Irene Strong about to jump

Irene Strong in the start position.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1946
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Irene Strong wearing her Team Canada swimsuit

Irene Strong at the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
1952-07-24
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1977 - FEATURE STORY
Swimming the English Channel has long been considered a worthy, and difficult, athletic feat. But a non-stop, two-way crossing is a formidable task. Cindy Nicholas of Scarborough, Ontario, was more than up to the challenge when she took to the water at Shakespeare Beach on September 7, 1977. The 20-year-old University of Toronto student had already proven her marathon swimming mettle. In 1974, she crossed Lake Ontario in record time and completed her first one-way swim of the English Channel. In 1976, she was named the world’s top woman marathon swimmer for a season that included two, one-way trips across the Channel. On September 8, 1977, Nicholas became the first woman and youngest swimmer to complete a round-trip, non-stop crossing of the English Channel. Her time of 19 hours, 55 minutes was also a record, demolishing by some 10 hours, the previous mark set in 1975 by American Jon Erikson.

1977 - FEATURE STORY
Swimming the English Channel has long been considered a worthy, and difficult, athletic feat. But a non-stop, two-way crossing is a formidable task. Cindy Nicholas of Scarborough, Ontario, was more than up to the challenge when she took to the water at Shakespeare Beach on September 7, 1977. The 20-year-old University of Toronto student had already proven her marathon swimming mettle. In 1974, she crossed Lake Ontario in record time and completed her first one-way swim of the English Channel. In 1976, she was named the world’s top woman marathon swimmer for a season that included two, one-way trips across the Channel. On September 8, 1977, Nicholas became the first woman and youngest swimmer to complete a round-trip, non-stop crossing of the English Channel. Her time of 19 hours, 55 minutes was also a record, demolishing by some 10 hours, the previous mark set in 1975 by American Jon Erikson.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Replica of the boat Cindy Nicholas used

An exact replica of the boat Cindy Nicholas used on her English Channel crossings.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame

993.15.12
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Map of Cindy Nicholas’ English Channel course

Map showing the direction of the course for Cindy Nicholas on the coastguard chart of the English Channel.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1976
993.15.5
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Cindy Nicholas’ certificate for swimming English Channel

This certificate was presented to Cindy Nicholas by the Channel Swimming Association to certify that she swam the English Channel as a double crossing in a world record time of 19 hours and 55 minutes.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1977
993.15.4
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Diploma displaying the Syria course Cindy Nicholas swam

Diploma showing the course of the Jaballah to Lattakia long distance swimming race won by Cindy Nicholas, the first and only woman to compete.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1970’s
993.15.3
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Cindy Nicholas’ red swimsuit

Swimsuit worn by Cindy Nicholas in her two way crossing of Chaleur Bay (from Pasepebiac, Quebec to Grand Anse, New Brunswick and back to Quebec) on August 13, 1978. Swim time: 14 hours and 54 minutes.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1978
993.15.7
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Cindy Nicholas Video

Initially hoping to be an Olympian, Cindy Nicholas discusses changing her focus after being cut from the 1972 Olympic team. After her father suggested she swim Lake Ontario, Nicholas took on the new challenge with success. Nicholas discusses swimming the English Channel, being named the Queen of the English Channel and winning Female Athlete of the year.

Well when I started I was planning to go to the Olympics and I went to the Olympic Trials in ’72 and then was hoping to go to the Montreal Olympics in ’76. My father every morning would say, “Why don’t you swim Lake Ontario? Marilyn Bell swam Lake Ontario.” And he kept saying that and then eventually I just did in 1974, I swam Lake Ontario, and then from then on it seemed like long distance was the thing for me to do.

When I swam for the English Channel I did a little bit, I did the same training in a pool with sprint swimmers, with a competitive club, with kids who were aiming to be in the Nationals or the Olympics. The only difference is I did a little bit outdoor swimming before I went to the English Channel. So I was up at Lake Rosseau, swam around there a little bit more and that was the only, thing I did. I went to the English Channel, practiced in the English Channel a couple of days and swam across it.

You have to get up very early and take a boat that you jump off of to get to the beach. And I remember you know waving and there was quite a few people at the beach that day, there was quite a few swimmers starting off to swim across the English Channel. I had a really difficult turn in France. When I went ashore there was a lot of waves and I was landing on rocks not on beach, and I got quite cut up and quite buffeted around and I was really sore and I was bleeding and it was cold. And so I knew I was on record but I was just trying to stop the bleeding [chuckle] from the rocks and the scratches, they hurt and they stung. And so when I was on the way back I just kept swimming and swimming and at about 14 hours into the swim is when I knew I was doing pretty darn good. But I thought any minute I might get caught by a tide and start not making any progression even though I was swimming fast. There’s always a tide could come by and put you back a little bit. And so I really wasn’t too sure until I was about three miles from shore that it was going to be a record swim.

I found out that if you swam the English Channel, the most for any woman you got the title of Queen of the English Channel. So when I did five I tied Greta Andersen’s record so that made me do six. And then I worried that someone else would want to be Queen of the English Channel just like I did so then I did seven, eight, nine and then I got up to nineteen. Thought that was going to be a solid record for my lifetime – and it wasn’t.

I have to say there’s three things in life that have been the most greatest things that have happened to me, outside of you know swimming and breaking a record but that I’ve been honoured with, something that I’ve been honoured with. And being Canada’s Woman Athlete of the Year was the first most spectacular thing that happened to me because of my swimming. As a result of a swim or swimming that I did I was honoured with that award and to this day it is one of the three greatest achievements that, or awards that have been bestowed on me that have just been a dream come true.

Creator: Bruce Weir

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1978 - FEATURE STORY
Graham Smith, already an outstanding Canadian and international swimmer, would confirm his status with a Silver medal as a member of Canada’s 4X100m medley relay team at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. In 1977 he began his assault of the record books by setting a world record in the 200m individual medley. But 1978 proved a golden, albeit poignant year for the 20-year-old Edmonton swimmer, whose father died of cancer in 1976, shortly after seeing his son stand on the Olympic podium. At the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, competing in the Donald F. Smith pool named after his father, Smith unleashed one of the most memorable campaigns in Canadian sport by winning six Gold Medals, three in Commonwealth record time. Weeks later he proved best in the world by winning the 200m individual medley at the World Aquatics Championships in West Berlin, adding a world record to his glory. The year’s achievements prompted Smith to acknowledge he was, indeed, “a big fish in a big pond.”

1978 - FEATURE STORY
Graham Smith, already an outstanding Canadian and international swimmer, would confirm his status with a Silver medal as a member of Canada’s 4X100m medley relay team at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. In 1977 he began his assault of the record books by setting a world record in the 200m individual medley. But 1978 proved a golden, albeit poignant year for the 20-year-old Edmonton swimmer, whose father died of cancer in 1976, shortly after seeing his son stand on the Olympic podium. At the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, competing in the Donald F. Smith pool named after his father, Smith unleashed one of the most memorable campaigns in Canadian sport by winning six Gold Medals, three in Commonwealth record time. Weeks later he proved best in the world by winning the 200m individual medley at the World Aquatics Championships in West Berlin, adding a world record to his glory. The year’s achievements prompted Smith to acknowledge he was, indeed, “a big fish in a big pond.”


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Graham Smith jumping into the pool

Graham Smith diving into the pool at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1976
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Graham Smith celebrates after he finished second in the 4x100m medley

Graham Smith after he finished second in the 4x100m medley at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1976
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Graham Smith swimming the breaststroke

Graham Smith swimming the breaststroke at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1976
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Graham Smith wearing his six Gold medals

Graham Smith wearing the six Gold medals he won at the Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Alberta.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1978
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Poster of Graham Smith with Diane Jones-Konihowski from the 1978 Commonwealth Games

Poster from the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton depicting Graham Smith and Diane Jones-Konihowski.

Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum
c. 1978
© 2012, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • ELA 1.1.2 experiment with a variety of strategies, activities and resources to explore ideas, observations, opinions, experiences and emotions
  • ELA 4.1.3 take ownership of text creation, by selecting or crafting a topic, concept or idea that is personally meaningful and engaging
  • ELA 4.1.4 develop and deliver a visual production considering factors [such as colour and contrast] appropriate to purpose, audience and situation
  • ELA 4.14 identify expectations and constraints of a communication situation, including assignment parameters, expected standards of quality and availability of resources and select strategies to address expectations and constraints

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