Innovation in sport is crucial to the success of any athlete. Consider the running shoe. If you look at today’s state of the art Puma’s Faas 500 (worn by the Jamaican Olympic Track Team) which are made up of industrial glues, petrochemical substances, foamy insoles, durable and flexible rubber soles, it is much different than the running shoe of 200 years ago which were made of cloth and animal skin. The running shoe has significantly changed over time. The following competitors represent different eras of their respective sports. Perdita Felicien, Robina Higgins, Robert Rankine, Donovan Bailey, Kurt Browning, Gérard Côté, and Sidney Crosby

Performance Tasks

Choose one of the following:

1. Using the images from the Teacher’s Centre and other search engines, create an Animoto video of the innovation changes in one of the sports represented (athletics, figure skating, or ice hockey) of the above athletes. Please focus on one piece of equipment Read More
Innovation in sport is crucial to the success of any athlete. Consider the running shoe. If you look at today’s state of the art Puma’s Faas 500 (worn by the Jamaican Olympic Track Team) which are made up of industrial glues, petrochemical substances, foamy insoles, durable and flexible rubber soles, it is much different than the running shoe of 200 years ago which were made of cloth and animal skin. The running shoe has significantly changed over time. The following competitors represent different eras of their respective sports. Perdita Felicien, Robina Higgins, Robert Rankine, Donovan Bailey, Kurt Browning, Gérard Côté, and Sidney Crosby

Performance Tasks

Choose one of the following:

1. Using the images from the Teacher’s Centre and other search engines, create an Animoto video of the innovation changes in one of the sports represented (athletics, figure skating, or ice hockey) of the above athletes. Please focus on one piece of equipment (i.e. running shoe, skate etc.) Please be advised that this task will require a full version of animoto which costs $5/month subscription. In addition, knowing how to use this software will be very useful before you begin the task.

2. Devise an innovation for a type of sports equipment. Students may create a radical innovation or incremental innovation for a piece of equipment for a particular sport. Please include the following sections.
  • Explain what type of innovation (radical or incremental), you are attempting.
  • Create a diagram with labels of your innovation
  • How would you market your product?
  • What type of materials would be required to make it?
  • How would the sport change because of your innovation?
Radical Innovation – a brand new product/process is created
Incremental Innovation – improves on an existing process/product (i.e.: adding a neck shield to a goalie mask)

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

2003 - FEATURE STORY
Perdita Felicien wouldn’t turn 23 until the following day, but on August 28, 2003 she presented herself with the birthday present of a lifetime in winning the women’s 100m hurdles final at the World Track and Field Championships in Paris. The win made Felicien the first Canadian female track and field athlete to win a world title. The Pickering, Ontario hurdler did so in outstanding fashion, outfinishing race favourite Brigitte Foster of Jamaica to take the Gold medal in a Canadian record 12.53 seconds. Earlier in the year Felicien, a former Ontario high school champion and two-time Canadian champion, had served notice she was an international talent to watch, as she won her second straight NCAA 100m hurdles title for the University of Illinois, becoming just the third woman to win back-to-back titles in the discipline. She also earned the Silver medal behind Foster at the 2003 Pan-American Games in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

2003 - FEATURE STORY
Perdita Felicien wouldn’t turn 23 until the following day, but on August 28, 2003 she presented herself with the birthday present of a lifetime in winning the women’s 100m hurdles final at the World Track and Field Championships in Paris. The win made Felicien the first Canadian female track and field athlete to win a world title. The Pickering, Ontario hurdler did so in outstanding fashion, outfinishing race favourite Brigitte Foster of Jamaica to take the Gold medal in a Canadian record 12.53 seconds. Earlier in the year Felicien, a former Ontario high school champion and two-time Canadian champion, had served notice she was an international talent to watch, as she won her second straight NCAA 100m hurdles title for the University of Illinois, becoming just the third woman to win back-to-back titles in the discipline. She also earned the Silver medal behind Foster at the 2003 Pan-American Games in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Perdita Felicien hurdling

Perdita Felicien competing in the final at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Victoria, BC.

Ryan Remiorz
2004-07-10
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Perdita Felicien’s shoes

A pair of Superfly G5 track shoes signed “P Felicien 100mh 60mh World Champ”.

Bata Shoe Museum
c. 2003-2004
© 2012, Bata Shoe Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Spikes and screw driver for tightening spikes

Spikes and screw driver for tightening spikes on the sole of the shoe.

Bata Shoe Museum
c. 2003-2004
© 2012, Bata Shoe Museum. All Rights Reserved.


1937 - FEATURE STORY
Robina Higgins had long been considered one of Canada’s top woman athletes before she was finally accorded the honour in 1937. Born in Winnipeg, she first honed her throwing skills as a baseball player. She then expanded that talent to athletics’ field events, proving outstanding in javelin, shot put, discus and baseball throw disciplines, winning national championships in all four events and setting several Canadian records along the way. She likely would have dominated at the 1937 Canadian Track and Field Championships, but athletics officials opted not to conduct a national competition that year, opting instead to hold zone trials for the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney. The 21-year-old stenographer from Winnipeg, however, rewrote her national javelin record in 1937, and edged golfer Mrs. John Rogers in voting for the country’s top woman athlete award. Higgins went on to win the Gold medal in javelin at the 1938 British Empire Games.

1937 - FEATURE STORY
Robina Higgins had long been considered one of Canada’s top woman athletes before she was finally accorded the honour in 1937. Born in Winnipeg, she first honed her throwing skills as a baseball player. She then expanded that talent to athletics’ field events, proving outstanding in javelin, shot put, discus and baseball throw disciplines, winning national championships in all four events and setting several Canadian records along the way. She likely would have dominated at the 1937 Canadian Track and Field Championships, but athletics officials opted not to conduct a national competition that year, opting instead to hold zone trials for the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney. The 21-year-old stenographer from Winnipeg, however, rewrote her national javelin record in 1937, and edged golfer Mrs. John Rogers in voting for the country’s top woman athlete award. Higgins went on to win the Gold medal in javelin at the 1938 British Empire Games.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Robina Higgins throws the javelin

Robina Higgins throwing the javelin at the British Empire Games.

Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum
c. 1938
© 2012, Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Robina Higgins with the javelin

Robina Higgins throwing the javelin.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1930’s
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Robina Higgins with a shot put

Robina Higgins throwing a shot put.

Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum
c. 1930’s
© 2012, Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum. All Rights Reserved.


1935 - FEATURE STORY
Early winners of Canadian male athlete of the year honours reflected a golden age of long distance running in Canada. Rankine, of Preston, Ontario, earned a Silver medal in the six-mile race and finished fourth in the three-mile event at the 1934 British Empire Games in London. The 1935 recognition of Robert Rankine marked yet another laurel for a distance runner. He continued his impressive distance running exploits by going undefeated in all of his races from five to 15 miles. He also won his second consecutive Canadian 10-mile championship, and then defeated the top American distance runners for the third straight time by setting a course record at the prestigious Berwick Modified Marathon. News reports note he then quit running for the rest of the season to undergo a hernia operation. Rankine went on to win a Silver medal in the men’s six-mile race and a Bronze medal in the men’s three-mile race at the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney.

1935 - FEATURE STORY
Early winners of Canadian male athlete of the year honours reflected a golden age of long distance running in Canada. Rankine, of Preston, Ontario, earned a Silver medal in the six-mile race and finished fourth in the three-mile event at the 1934 British Empire Games in London. The 1935 recognition of Robert Rankine marked yet another laurel for a distance runner. He continued his impressive distance running exploits by going undefeated in all of his races from five to 15 miles. He also won his second consecutive Canadian 10-mile championship, and then defeated the top American distance runners for the third straight time by setting a course record at the prestigious Berwick Modified Marathon. News reports note he then quit running for the rest of the season to undergo a hernia operation. Rankine went on to win a Silver medal in the men’s six-mile race and a Bronze medal in the men’s three-mile race at the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Robert Rankine running

Robert Rankine running on a track.

Waterloo Region Museum
c. 1940-1959
© 2012, Waterloo Region Museum, Region of Waterloo. All Rights Reserved.


Photograph of Robert Rankine

Portrait of Robert Rankine.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1937
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1996 - FEATURE STORY
Every Olympic Gold medal is special, but the one most coveted goes to the winner of the men’s 100m champion, for with the medal comes the title of World’s Fastest Man. A year prior to the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Bailey of Oakville, Ontario, proved world’s fastest at the 1995 IAAF World Track and Field Championships in Goteborg, Sweden, winning the men’s 100m, while also contributing to Canada’s victory in the 4x100m relay. A world championship brings great honour, but an Olympic Gold medal is unparalleled. Bailey was slow out of the blocks when the pistol blasted the start of the 1996 Olympic 100m final, but the 28-year-old Canadian accelerated through every stride to win the Olympic marquee event in a world record 9.84 seconds. Eight days later Bailey ran the anchor leg as Canada upset the favoured American foursome to win the men’s 4x100m relay final.

1996 - FEATURE STORY
Every Olympic Gold medal is special, but the one most coveted goes to the winner of the men’s 100m champion, for with the medal comes the title of World’s Fastest Man. A year prior to the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Bailey of Oakville, Ontario, proved world’s fastest at the 1995 IAAF World Track and Field Championships in Goteborg, Sweden, winning the men’s 100m, while also contributing to Canada’s victory in the 4x100m relay. A world championship brings great honour, but an Olympic Gold medal is unparalleled. Bailey was slow out of the blocks when the pistol blasted the start of the 1996 Olympic 100m final, but the 28-year-old Canadian accelerated through every stride to win the Olympic marquee event in a world record 9.84 seconds. Eight days later Bailey ran the anchor leg as Canada upset the favoured American foursome to win the men’s 4x100m relay final.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Donovan Bailey salutes the crowd

Donovan Bailey waves to the crowd before competing in the 4x100m race at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Frank Gunn
1996-08-07
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Donovan Bailey receiving the baton

Donovan Bailey receives the baton from Bruny Surin in the 4x100m race at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Frank Gunn
1996-08-03
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Donovan Bailey celebrates on the track with the Canadian flag

Donovan Bailey running on the track with the Canadian flag at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
1996-07-27
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Donovan Bailey’s shoe

Shoe worn by Donovan Bailey during his warm-up before the 150 metre race against Michael Johnson.

Bata Shoe Museum
c. 1997
© 2012, Bata Shoe Museum. All Rights Reserved.


1990 - FEATURE STORY
Kurt Browning captivated the figure skating world when he finished sixth at the 1988 World Figure Skating Championships in Hungary with a routine that included a quadruple toe loop, the first time a quadruple jump had been landed in competition. A year later he won his first World Championship and it seemed life couldn’t get better. But in 1990, Alberta’s Browning revealed his mettle and true champion quality. Injuries and distractions that abound with being a world champion had hampered the 23-year-old’s results earlier in the season and there was enormous pressure on him as the 1990 World Figure Skating Championships were held in Halifax. Browning proved ready for the challenge, thrilling the home country crowd with a long program that included seven triple jumps, but no quad, to surpass Viktor Petrenko of the Soviet Union. The win made Browning the first male skater in 16 years to repeat as world champion.

1991 - FEATURE STORY
Good things come in “threes” and in 1991 Kurt Browning secured his third consecutive world title by winning the 1991 World Figure Skating Champions Read More

1990 - FEATURE STORY
Kurt Browning captivated the figure skating world when he finished sixth at the 1988 World Figure Skating Championships in Hungary with a routine that included a quadruple toe loop, the first time a quadruple jump had been landed in competition. A year later he won his first World Championship and it seemed life couldn’t get better. But in 1990, Alberta’s Browning revealed his mettle and true champion quality. Injuries and distractions that abound with being a world champion had hampered the 23-year-old’s results earlier in the season and there was enormous pressure on him as the 1990 World Figure Skating Championships were held in Halifax. Browning proved ready for the challenge, thrilling the home country crowd with a long program that included seven triple jumps, but no quad, to surpass Viktor Petrenko of the Soviet Union. The win made Browning the first male skater in 16 years to repeat as world champion.

1991 - FEATURE STORY
Good things come in “threes” and in 1991 Kurt Browning secured his third consecutive world title by winning the 1991 World Figure Skating Championship in Munich, with a long program that included three triples in combination. The feat confirmed Browning as one of the best ever in the sport with his complete package of outstanding jumps, intricate footwork, artistry and showmanship.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Kurt Browning at the World Figure Skating Championships

Kurt Browning competing at the World Figure Skating Championships in Paris, France.

Paul Chiasson
1989-03-15
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Figure skates worn by Kurt Browning when he landed the first quadruple jump in competition

Figure skates worn by Kurt Browning when he landed the first ever quadruple jump (a toe loop) in competition at the 1988 World Figure Skating Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1988
994.6.1
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Kurt Browning performing

Kurt Browning performing a figure skating routine.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1990’s
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Kurt Browning skates with one leg in the air

Kurt Browning during a figure skating routine.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1990
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Kurt Browning figure skating

Kurt Browning during a figure skating routine.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1990
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Kurt Browning Video

Kurt Browning discusses the pressure of defending his World Figure Skating Championship in 1990. He explains how hard he worked and the difficulty of skating with an injured toe. In 1991, he remembers successfully executing the triple-triple combination to win his third straight title and recalls winning the Lionel Conacher Award twice.

Being a World Champion was hard and Halifax was very important for some pretty obvious reasons. It was in Canada, my family was there, my friends were there, they flew out. It was it was huge. It was also the last competition that compulsory figures were ever involved. And I had put many thousands of dollars and hours into compulsory figures, so my coach Michael Jiranek was very proud of my figures. Needed to win this competition for all sorts of reasons. It was the last chance to use those figures. And I was defending World Champion but I was more on the defensive actually. I had a sore toe which sounds like nothing, but try and shove it in a skate and make it work. To look back after that win in Halifax and to see that I was the only male athlete from Canada in our sport, my sport to ever have won it twice, let alone back-to-back was, it was kind of an awakening to what could be. I will tell you, when I went to Germany I not only didn’t feel any pressure but I knew I was going to win. I was one cocky young man. And everything that I’d gone through when I won Worlds in ’89, getting to the World Championships in Halifax was awful, it was truly awful. It was no sleep, it was injuries, trauma, the world was trying to figure out who Kurt Browning is, there was a lot of media. And being a World Champion got me all nervous. I was over that, over it and I had a game plan that I just thought Viktor Petrenko is not touching me. I have all these triple-triple combinations, got my quad. The triple-triple combinations happened for a distinct reason. My coach Michael Jiranek told me I was not going to win and that it was Viktor Petrenko’s turn to win, that the judges and the skating media and everyone was going towards him. And I said well that’s not fair, we haven’t competed yet. And he goes, “Well what are you going to do about it?” So I came up with a game plan of having these triple-triple combinations, and it was kind of like trying to hit two home runs at once. It was, it was farther than anybody had sort of stretched the triple thing at that time. But I thought it was my only chance to win. And I only did that program clean once before the World Championships, just once. But after doing it, it was about seven days before I left and after that I went, “At least I know now I can do it.” And it wasn’t clean, I popped my quad but I did get in three triple-triples which set a record.

I was the first figure skater to ever win the Lionel Conacher Award. It was a weird feeling to be honest. The first one was exciting and fun and wow, I won in Canada and somehow it made sense. The second one, even in my own heart I was thinking really, did I win? But my friends, my friends who love hockey they didn’t, they didn’t let it go quietly into the night. “What do you mean you’re better than Wayne or better than Mario?” I’m like “Come on it’s not my fault, I didn’t pick, it was the press.” They say, “Yeah come on, get over yourself.” So I didn’t really get a big head over that one. My friends kept me pretty humble.

Creator: Bruce Weir

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1940 - FEATURE STORY
Gérard Côté’s first sporting love was boxing but no one will ever know how well he might have done in the ring. Growing up in St. Hyacinthe, Quebec, Côté began running as part of his boxing training, but decided he preferred running to boxing. He never looked back, although success took time. Côté set his sights on winning the prestigious Boston Marathon, but in four attempts he could finish no better than seventh place. In 1940, he declared that year’s entry would be his fifth and final attempt. The diminutive 26-year-old runner finally had his day. Côté won the race in 2 hours, 28 minutes, 28 seconds, hacking 23 seconds off the course record. Months later he would complete an impressive marathon double, by winning the Yonkers Marathon, noting in interviews he incorporated snowshoe running as part of his training. Côté would go on to win three more Boston Marathons, two more Yonkers events and compete at the 1948 Olympic Games in London.

1940 - FEATURE STORY
Gérard Côté’s first sporting love was boxing but no one will ever know how well he might have done in the ring. Growing up in St. Hyacinthe, Quebec, Côté began running as part of his boxing training, but decided he preferred running to boxing. He never looked back, although success took time. Côté set his sights on winning the prestigious Boston Marathon, but in four attempts he could finish no better than seventh place. In 1940, he declared that year’s entry would be his fifth and final attempt. The diminutive 26-year-old runner finally had his day. Côté won the race in 2 hours, 28 minutes, 28 seconds, hacking 23 seconds off the course record. Months later he would complete an impressive marathon double, by winning the Yonkers Marathon, noting in interviews he incorporated snowshoe running as part of his training. Côté would go on to win three more Boston Marathons, two more Yonkers events and compete at the 1948 Olympic Games in London.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Medal awarded to Gérard Côté

Medal awarded to Gérard Côté in 1942 when he won the 3 mile Canadian Snowshoe Championship.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1942
960.4.5
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Gérard Côté’s snowshoes

Snowshoes worn by Gérard Côté.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1940's
960.4.6
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Gérard Côté wearing a sleeveless shirt

Photograph of Gérard Côté wearing a singlet with the Canadian maple leaf on it, as well as the word “Army.”

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1940's
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Gérard Côté finishing a race

Gérard Côté crossing the finish line at the end of a race.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1940's
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Gérard Côté’s sweater

Sweater worn by Gérard Côté at the 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games held in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1954
960.4.1
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


2007 - FEATURE STORY
Selected first over-all in the 2005 NHL entry draft, Nova Scotia’s Sidney Crosby didn’t disappoint. He went from a player with potential to a marquee name in his rookie season (2005-2006) with the Pittsburgh Penguins when, at age 18, he became the youngest player to score 100 points in one season. Could he build on that initial success? The answer in 2006-2007 was a resounding Yes! Crosby closed out his second season with 36 goals and 84 assists, becoming the youngest player to win the Art Ross Trophy as the league scoring champion. He also earned the Hart Trophy as NHL most valuable player and the Lester B. Pearson Award as league’s outstanding player, voted upon by his peers. Indeed, “Sid The Kid” was considered the most exciting hockey talent since Wayne Gretzky and, like the Great One, his skill and exuberance on the ice were complemented by a confident, diplomatic demeanour away from the rink.

2009 - FEATURE STORY
At age 21, he was the second youngest player on the 2008-2009 Pittsburgh Penguins’ roster, but as team captain Sidney Crosby enjoyed a special privi Read More

2007 - FEATURE STORY
Selected first over-all in the 2005 NHL entry draft, Nova Scotia’s Sidney Crosby didn’t disappoint. He went from a player with potential to a marquee name in his rookie season (2005-2006) with the Pittsburgh Penguins when, at age 18, he became the youngest player to score 100 points in one season. Could he build on that initial success? The answer in 2006-2007 was a resounding Yes! Crosby closed out his second season with 36 goals and 84 assists, becoming the youngest player to win the Art Ross Trophy as the league scoring champion. He also earned the Hart Trophy as NHL most valuable player and the Lester B. Pearson Award as league’s outstanding player, voted upon by his peers. Indeed, “Sid The Kid” was considered the most exciting hockey talent since Wayne Gretzky and, like the Great One, his skill and exuberance on the ice were complemented by a confident, diplomatic demeanour away from the rink.

2009 - FEATURE STORY
At age 21, he was the second youngest player on the 2008-2009 Pittsburgh Penguins’ roster, but as team captain Sidney Crosby enjoyed a special privilege before his more experienced teammates – hoisting the Stanley Cup. Crosby led Pittsburgh to its first Stanley Cup in 17 years and became just the sixth hockey player to win Canadian Male Athlete of the Year more than once.

2010 - FEATURE STORY
Sidney Crosby joined the rare group of players renowned for scoring “the goal”: Bobby Orr flew through the air after his overtime winner securing the 1970 Stanley Cup for Boston. Paul Henderson became a Canadian icon after his goal gave Team Canada victory over the Soviet Union at the 1972 Summit Series. Mario Lemieux took a pass from Wayne Gretzky to score the game winning goal in overtime for Canada in the deciding game of the 1987 Canada Cup in Hamilton. Crosby’s goal was truly golden as it came in overtime of the men’s Olympic hockey final , giving Canada a 3-2 win over the United States to cap the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Sidney Crosby celebrating with the Stanley Cup

Sidney Crosby holding the Stanley Cup after the Pittsburgh Penguins defeated the Detroit Red Wings in Game seven in Detroit.

Frank Gunn
2009-06-12
© 2012, The Canadian Press. All Rights Reserved.


Sidney Crosby scoring a goal

Sidney Crosby scores the game winning goal against the Ottawa Senators during first round playoff action.

Jonathan Hayward
2007-04-14
© 2012, The Canadian Press. All Rights Reserved.


Sidney Crosby with three prestigious NHL Awards

Sidney Crosby poses with the Hart, Lester B. Pearson, and the Art Ross trophies he won at the NHL Awards.

Frank Gunn
2007-06-14
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


photographic print collage of Sidney Crosby

A Sidney Crosby photographic print surrounded by 20 Upper deck 'Phenomenal Beginning' hockey trading cards.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 2000's
2010.4.11
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • ICT P.3 select and use independently multimedia capabilities for presentations invarious subject areas
  • ICT F.2 analyze how technological innovations and creativity affect the economy
  • ENT 2.1 demonstrate skills in generating ideas, alternatives and strategies
  • ENT 2.5 demonstrate characteristics of creative thinking

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