Competitive sports are fast. Sometimes so quick that if you blink too slowly you could miss a key moment in sports history. Over the last century, with the advances in technology, it has become very easy to capture critical sports moments. These athletes have been caught in their crucial sports moment, Jacques Villeneuve, Kyle Shewfelt, Lucile Wheeler, Alison Sydor and Mary Rose Thacker.

Performance Tasks

Choose one of the following:

1. Choose one of the above athletes. Create and manage a Facebook page. The page must cover: history of what the player did to help their team succeed, types of friends they would have, where they live, wall posts, what types of events would they create etc.

2. Using a video camera or flip camera and YouTube, choose 3 friends and create a ‘Greatest Sports Moment’ video collection. Go to Read More
Competitive sports are fast. Sometimes so quick that if you blink too slowly you could miss a key moment in sports history. Over the last century, with the advances in technology, it has become very easy to capture critical sports moments. These athletes have been caught in their crucial sports moment, Jacques Villeneuve, Kyle Shewfelt, Lucile Wheeler, Alison Sydor and Mary Rose Thacker.

Performance Tasks

Choose one of the following:

1. Choose one of the above athletes. Create and manage a Facebook page. The page must cover: history of what the player did to help their team succeed, types of friends they would have, where they live, wall posts, what types of events would they create etc.

2. Using a video camera or flip camera and YouTube, choose 3 friends and create a ‘Greatest Sports Moment’ video collection. Go to Greatest Sporting Moments and send in your YouTube videos so they can be added to this national sport exhibit.

3. Create a musical song about one of the athletes above. Using a musical instrument or music software, write, play and record a song. Play it for your classmates (or maybe your school!). Please be advised that a strong working knowledge of music and/or musical software is necessary to complete this task in a timely manner.

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

1995 - FEATURE STORY
1995 would see Jacques Villeneuve follow in the tire tracks of his famous driving father Gilles. Jacques’ individual highlight was winning the famous Indianapolis 500. But that was only one race in a long season of excellence that brought Villeneuve and his Team Green the driving title in the Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) circuit. He won three other races, at Miami, Cleveland and at Road America in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, winning six pole positions in 17 starts for Team Green.

1997 - FEATURE STORY
Having graduated to the Formula One circuit, Jacques Villeneuve continued his career ascent in spectacular fashion. As lead driver for the Williams racing team, he won the F1 drivers’ championship, something no Canadian before or since has been able to accomplish. He rattled off seven victories – in Brazil, Argentina, Spain, Britain, Hungary, Austria and Luxembourg – and earned 10 pole positions overall as fastest qualifier.

1995 - FEATURE STORY
1995 would see Jacques Villeneuve follow in the tire tracks of his famous driving father Gilles. Jacques’ individual highlight was winning the famous Indianapolis 500. But that was only one race in a long season of excellence that brought Villeneuve and his Team Green the driving title in the Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) circuit. He won three other races, at Miami, Cleveland and at Road America in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, winning six pole positions in 17 starts for Team Green.

1997 - FEATURE STORY
Having graduated to the Formula One circuit, Jacques Villeneuve continued his career ascent in spectacular fashion. As lead driver for the Williams racing team, he won the F1 drivers’ championship, something no Canadian before or since has been able to accomplish. He rattled off seven victories – in Brazil, Argentina, Spain, Britain, Hungary, Austria and Luxembourg – and earned 10 pole positions overall as fastest qualifier.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Jacques Villeneuve racing in Spain

Jacques Villeneuve racing to a third place finish at the European Grand Prix in Jerez, Spain.

Ryan Remiorz
1997-10-26
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Racing suit worn by Jacques Villeneuve during the Toyota Atlantic Championship Series

Racing suit worn by Jacques Villeneuve in 1993.

Gilles Villeneuve Museum
c. 1993
© 2012, Gilles Villeneuve Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Jacques Villeneuve’s Lucky Strike racing suit

Lucky Strike racing suit worn by Jacques Villeneuve.

Gilles Villeneuve Museum
c. 2000
© 2012, Gilles Villeneuve Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Jacques Villeneuve’s Formula One BAR Honda car used in 2000

Formula 1 BAR Honda car, driven by Jacques Villeneuve.

Gilles Villeneuve Museum
c. 1999
© 2012, Gilles Villeneuve Museum. All Rights Reserved.


A bolt from Jacques Villeneuve’s race car

A bolt from Jacques Villeneuve’s 1997 William.

Gilles Villeneuve Museum
c. 1997
© 2012, Gilles Villeneuve Museum. All Rights Reserved.


2004 - FEATURE STORY
Calgary gymnast Kyle Shewfelt ended his Olympic floor routine receiving the highest score in the competition at 9.787 points. Unfortunately Shewfelt had company as Romania’s Marian Dragulescu also earned the same score for his performance. Judges were forced to implement Olympic tiebreak rules to determine the winner of the men’s floor event at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens with 22-year-old Shewfelt emerging the winner, becoming the first Canadian to win Olympic Gold in artistic gymnastics. He went to Athens as a medal contender after winning Bronze medals in the floor and vault events at the 2003 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships in Anaheim, California. He fulfilled his potential, winning Canada’s first Gold medal of the 2004 Games. A day later, Shewfelt finished fourth in the vault with a performance observers believed worthy of a Bronze medal, but the result stood despite protests by Canadian officials.

2004 - FEATURE STORY
Calgary gymnast Kyle Shewfelt ended his Olympic floor routine receiving the highest score in the competition at 9.787 points. Unfortunately Shewfelt had company as Romania’s Marian Dragulescu also earned the same score for his performance. Judges were forced to implement Olympic tiebreak rules to determine the winner of the men’s floor event at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens with 22-year-old Shewfelt emerging the winner, becoming the first Canadian to win Olympic Gold in artistic gymnastics. He went to Athens as a medal contender after winning Bronze medals in the floor and vault events at the 2003 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships in Anaheim, California. He fulfilled his potential, winning Canada’s first Gold medal of the 2004 Games. A day later, Shewfelt finished fourth in the vault with a performance observers believed worthy of a Bronze medal, but the result stood despite protests by Canadian officials.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Kyle Shewfelt does the splits during a floor routine

Kyle Shewfelt performing his Gold medal winning floor routine at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Adrian Wyld
2004-08-22
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Kyle Shewfelt shows his Gold medal

Kyle Shewfelt shows off the Gold medal he won in the artistic gymnastics event at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Adrian Wyld
2004-08-22
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


Kyle Shewfelt’s shoes

Shoes worn by Kyle Shewfelt when he won the Gold medal in the artistic gymnastics event at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 2004
205.19.3 OHOF
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Kyle Shewfelt’s shorts

Shorts worn by Kyle Shewfelt when he won the Gold medal in the artistic gymnastics event at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 2004
205.19.2 OHOF
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Kyle Shewfelt’s tunic

Tunic worn by Kyle Shewfelt when he won the Gold medal in the artistic gymnastics event at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 2004
205.19.1 OHOF
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Kyle Shewfelt Video

Kyle Shewfelt discusses playing hockey growing up. Heading into his gymnastics floor routine at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, he recalls how he planned for an amazing performance for a long time. He explains how much he enjoyed the floor discipline, being the first Canadian to win an Olympic medal in gymnastics, and his feelings afterwards.

I was a young hockey player in the beginning of my athletic career. My dad was actually a hockey player, he played for the Brandon Wheat Kings. So I think he wanted his little boys to be to be hockey guys. And I played it and I loved it and I was a great skater, but I just, I couldn’t score goals and for me it just didn’t click. It was kind of, it was a hassle to get up and go to hockey. He had to really pull me there.

For 16 years I planned to have my perfect performance in the Olympic final in 2004 and, and it happened, and I don’t know, sometimes I get chills right now thinking about it because I don’t know how it happened. It was just everything went into that moment. At 8:30 that night I knew I would be competing and it was taking deep breaths and each breath that I took was one second closer to that moment.

My favourite event was always floor. I, I absolutely loved it. Obvious, I liked it because it was my best but I also really loved the opportunity to be able to show some artistic expression and to be able to add some of your own personality and your own, your own charisma into the routine. I loved paying attention to the small details and I felt like floor was the one where those got noticed the most.

There was the biggest amount of pressure you could ever imagine. I mean a Canadian had never won a medal in the sport of gymnastics. I had won two Bronze medals at the World Championships before. I had an injury that year leading up and there was a lot of questions like, “Am I going to be able to do this?”

Biggest amount of pressure actually came from myself because I knew that I was capable of winning. I knew I was. And I think that’s the reason why I did end up doing so well there is because I did believe that I had a chance. And I mean there, there can be so much pressure around you and the expectation but I think athletes put the most on themselves.

It was the perfect routine in the perfect moment and literally everything in it was to the highest level of perfection that it could have been. And it’s funny because I planned it that way. For me it was a different experience than I, I hear a lot of athletes have. A lot of athletes say it was the most amazing thing of their life. But for me I actually didn’t feel like I was there. I didn’t feel like I was present and I didn’t know how to get myself present because it literally felt like I was immersed in this dream that I’d had for so long. Like it was that real. The dream that I had was that real that I had a hard time separating dream from reality. But it was the next day, or probably about four o’clock in the morning that night that it really occurred to me, like this is real. I won the Olympics.

Creator: Bruce Weir

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1958 - Feature Story
When twenty year old Lucile Wheeler won both the downhill and giant slalom titles at the 1958 World Championships in Bad Gastein, Austria, she was breaking new ground and making up for lost time. Wheeler became the first North American to win an Olympic medal in the downhill, winning Bronze at the 1956 Olympic Winter Games in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy. The upset victories in Austria caught the imagination of the Canadian public and generated plenty of interest in skiing. A year later, for the first time, Canada sent a team of skiers to Europe to compete in the season’s races. For Wheeler in 1958, the World Championship appearance was simply overdue; she had qualified as a 14-year-old to attend the World Championship in Aspen, Colorado, but her parents decided she was too young to miss too much school and she never got the chance to attend. Wheeler made the most of her second opportunity. No Canadian woman would win again at the World Championships until Betsy Clifford in 1970.

1958 - Feature Story
When twenty year old Lucile Wheeler won both the downhill and giant slalom titles at the 1958 World Championships in Bad Gastein, Austria, she was breaking new ground and making up for lost time. Wheeler became the first North American to win an Olympic medal in the downhill, winning Bronze at the 1956 Olympic Winter Games in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy. The upset victories in Austria caught the imagination of the Canadian public and generated plenty of interest in skiing. A year later, for the first time, Canada sent a team of skiers to Europe to compete in the season’s races. For Wheeler in 1958, the World Championship appearance was simply overdue; she had qualified as a 14-year-old to attend the World Championship in Aspen, Colorado, but her parents decided she was too young to miss too much school and she never got the chance to attend. Wheeler made the most of her second opportunity. No Canadian woman would win again at the World Championships until Betsy Clifford in 1970.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Lucile Wheeler skiing down a hill

Lucile Wheeler competing in the Downhill event at the 1956 Olympic Winter Games in Cortina D'Ampezzo.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
1956-02-01
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Lucile Wheeler skiing

Lucile Wheeler at the Fédération Internationale de Ski World Championships in Bad Gastein, Austria.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1958
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Lucile Wheeler (right) with

Downhill skiers Anne Heggtveit (left), Ginette Sequin (centre) and Lucile Wheeler (right).

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1950's
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Lucile Wheeler skiing around a pole

Lucile Wheeler competing in a skiing event.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1958
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Head shot of Lucile Wheeler

Portrait of Lucile Wheeler.

Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
c. 1950's
© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


Lucile Wheeler Video

Wheeler discusses her training regimes in Quebec, and sometimes with men in Europe. She believes her strong skiing technique led to her success. She then explains how the Canadian Alpine Ski Team wasn’t as developed as European teams in the 1950’s. She also talks about her 1956 Olympic Bronze medal, and winning Female Athlete of the Year.

I think throughout my lifetime I had always had the opportunity of very good technical training in skiing. May not have had the terrain of Europe but of course the ski school, Great Snow Eagle Ski School at Gray Rocks was very well known and so I was very fortunate I think to have a basic good technique so that when I was in Europe and watched the other racers, and I watched I guess mostly the top men racers and often skied and trained with them, I was able to pick up what I wanted to learn.

When we first went over to the 1952 Olympics we went directly to the Olympics and had never competed internationally. Most of the countries had national teams and we did not. And the only time we came together as a team was when there was an Olympics or World Ski Championships. And it would only be for a short period before the Olympics or World Championships. And then once those events were over we were on our own. So I would say that probably was a bit of a disadvantage.

The downhill in 1956 Olympics was a tremendous learning experience. The top of the course was extremely steep and I always remember my coach just before starting a training run, he said to me, he said, “Cile, why do you go where the cows go?” Because in Austria and Italy and Switzerland in the summer time the cows are up in those areas. And so I could kind of picture the cow path down through these gates and all of a sudden I saw the line that he wanted me to take. And so there was no turning back. So it was amazing how one sentence changed a great deal for me.

Winning the Bronze medal in 1956 certainly made me think that I could do more, could do better and I had been able to return to Europe in 1957 and race in what was called an In-Between Season, and I was the first Canadian to win the Hahnenkamm, I won the downhill and combined. And at the ’58 World Championships I felt that I should win and trained hard to win and I remember when I came down and had won the downhill and my very close friend Gigi Seguin from Quebec City came over and said you won. And I said no I didn’t, and we almost got into quite a severe argument about as to whether I won or not. And then two days later winning the Giant Slalom, a lot of pressure was off me, so perhaps that was a little easier to win.

It’s always a tremendous thrill to be selected to win an award such as the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award and it’s just a great feeling to be a part of that and included with all the other names that are on that trophy.

Creator: Bruce Weir

© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.


1996 - FEATURE STORY
Long before North Vancouver’s Alison Sydor became the best in the world on two wheels she was the best in Alberta in three events – winning the Alberta junior triathlon championship. But at age 21, she began concentrating her energy on cycling, becoming a member of the national road team and a 1992 Olympian even as she began dabbling in mountain biking. Sydor quickly became a world force in the burgeoning cycling discipline on trails, winning the 1994 and 1995 World Championship. The year 1996 confirmed her status as the top female athlete in Canada and a world star. Sydor, 30, won her third consecutive World Mountain Bike Championship in Cairns, Australia and the World Cup cross-country title by winning six of 10 events on the circuit. She also earned a Silver medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Velonews Magazine honoured her as its International Cyclist of 1996.

1996 - FEATURE STORY
Long before North Vancouver’s Alison Sydor became the best in the world on two wheels she was the best in Alberta in three events – winning the Alberta junior triathlon championship. But at age 21, she began concentrating her energy on cycling, becoming a member of the national road team and a 1992 Olympian even as she began dabbling in mountain biking. Sydor quickly became a world force in the burgeoning cycling discipline on trails, winning the 1994 and 1995 World Championship. The year 1996 confirmed her status as the top female athlete in Canada and a world star. Sydor, 30, won her third consecutive World Mountain Bike Championship in Cairns, Australia and the World Cup cross-country title by winning six of 10 events on the circuit. She also earned a Silver medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Velonews Magazine honoured her as its International Cyclist of 1996.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Alison Sydor on her mountain bike

Alison Sydor competing in the women’s cross country mountain biking event at the Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Canada.

Frank Gunn
1992-08-02
© 2012, CP photo. All Rights Reserved.


1939 - FEATURE STORY
Winnipeg’s Mary Rose Thacker was a promising young skater when she arrived at the 1939 National championships for her first foray in the senior ranks. No one expected the 16-year-old to come away with a win. She had won the Canadian Junior Figure Skating Championships in Montreal two years earlier, but that victory had also been regarded as an upset and she lost the 1938 competition season due to injury. But in February, she demonstrated her prowess in school figures, securing the 1939 Canadian Amateur Figure Skating Championship in Ottawa with a skating program that may have been shaky in jumps, but rich in performance. Later that year Thacker, the second youngest athlete in the competition, again led after school figures at the 1939 North American Figure Skating Championships in Toronto and went on to win the women’s title. Thacker then travelled to England to prepare for the 1940 Olympic Winter Games in Sapporo, but returned home when the Games were cancelled due to the outbreak of the Second World War.

1941 - FEATURE STORY
Two years after scoring an impressive figure skating double by Read More

1939 - FEATURE STORY
Winnipeg’s Mary Rose Thacker was a promising young skater when she arrived at the 1939 National championships for her first foray in the senior ranks. No one expected the 16-year-old to come away with a win. She had won the Canadian Junior Figure Skating Championships in Montreal two years earlier, but that victory had also been regarded as an upset and she lost the 1938 competition season due to injury. But in February, she demonstrated her prowess in school figures, securing the 1939 Canadian Amateur Figure Skating Championship in Ottawa with a skating program that may have been shaky in jumps, but rich in performance. Later that year Thacker, the second youngest athlete in the competition, again led after school figures at the 1939 North American Figure Skating Championships in Toronto and went on to win the women’s title. Thacker then travelled to England to prepare for the 1940 Olympic Winter Games in Sapporo, but returned home when the Games were cancelled due to the outbreak of the Second World War.

1941 - FEATURE STORY
Two years after scoring an impressive figure skating double by winning the Canadian and North American championships, Mary Rose Thacker repeated the feat. Ballet studies had improved her free skating program and the popular Winnipeg teen again secured the women’s titles at the 1939 Canadian Amateur Figure Skating Championship in Montreal and at the 1939 North American Figure Skating Championship in Ardmore, Pennsylvania to earn Canadian female athlete honours.


© 2012, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. All Rights Reserved.

Mary Rose Thacker skating

Mary Rose Thacker skating in front of the Fort Garry Hotel in Winnipeg.

Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum
c. 1939-1950
© 2012, Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Mary Rose Thacker performing

Mary Rose Thacker performing a spiral.

Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum
c. 1939-1950
© 2012, Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Child photograph of Mary Rose Thacker

Mary Rose Thacker as a child.

Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum
c. 1928-1932
© 2012, Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Mary Rose Thacker mid-air

Mary Rose Thacker performing a skating jump.

Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum
c. 1939-1950
© 2012, Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum. All Rights Reserved.


Photograph of Mary Rose Thacker

A portrait of Mary Rose Thacker

Skate Canada archives

© 2012, Skate Canada archives. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • ICT P.3 select and use, independently, multimedia capabilities for presentations in various subject areas
  • ICT C.1 select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources
  • ICT F.2 use technology outside formal classroom setting

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