Maple sap birchbark basket

With no seams on the sides, this traditional Algonquin birchbark basket was leaktight. The First Nations peoples collected maple sap and reduced it in bark and ceramic pots. People only began transforming the sap into the syrup and sugar we know today when the French introduced metal pots. 1973 Lena Nottaway, Anishinabeg (Algonquin) Birchbark, spruce root, 12 x 15.2 x 21.5 cm MCQ, 75-1065

Lena Nottaway, Anishinabeg (Algonquin)
c. 1973
Birchbark, spruce root
12 x 15.2 x 21.5 cm
75-1065
© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


Tripod kettle in iron

In the 17th and 18th centuries, tripod kettles were placed directly on the embers in the hearth to cook foods. The pots, knives and other metal kitchen tools introduced by the French made it easier to prepare food and were adopted by the First Nations peoples. Tripod kettle, ca. 1800 Iron, 30 x 39 cm Musée de la civilisation, 68-180

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1800
Iron
30 x 39 cm
68-180
© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


British teapot with Québec landscapes and a beaver.

Beginning in the mid 18th century, English ceramics progressively replaced the tin plates in homes across the colony. Québec merchant Francis T. Thomas promoted dinnerware sets imported from Scotland and decorated with Québec landscapes that became very popular as of 1870. The sets included a tea set—a typically British addition. Dinnerware, 1880-1910 Cochran & Fleming, Britannia Pottery Fine white earthenware 65-597

Cochran & Fleming, Britannia Pottery
Musée de la civilisation
c. 1880-1910
Fine white earthenware
65-597
© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


Steinberg grocery bag

In 1917, a Jewish-Hungarian immigrant named Ida Steinberg opened a modest grocery store on Saint-Laurent Boulevard in Montréal. In 1934, her son Samuel and his four brothers took over. At the store, customers could serve themselves instead of waiting at a counter. A few years later, the Steinbergs were running Canada’s largest supermarket chain. Grocery bag, 1970-1992 Paper, 46.5 x 30 x 18 cm Musée de la civilisation, 96-79

Steinberg
c. 1970-1992
Paper
46.5 x 30 x 18 cm
96-79
© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


Stand electric mixer with bowl.

The Mixmaster is the first mixer with two detachable beaters with interlocking blades. First marketed in 1930, it was Sunbeam’s flagship product for 40 years. Stand mixer, ca. 1947 Sunbeam, United States Chrome-plated steel, plastic, rubber, 32.5 x 18.9 x 33 cm Musée de la civilisation, 89-1664

Sunbeam
c. 1947
Chrome-plated steel, plastic, rubber
32.5 x 18.9 x 33 cm
89-1664
© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

This activity aims to understand what is food heritage and the relationship between historical periods and what we eat today.

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