Mincemeat pan filled with mincemeat ingredients. On the top, a wooden spoon.

Year after year, Helen Meredith devotes a great deal of effort to making mincemeat that is as authentic as possible. Some of the ingredients are difficult to find. In fact, she travels all the way to Ottawa for Northern Spy apples. She also uses the same pan her British grandmother used to make preserves.

Unknown
Meredith family

© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


A woman looking at a collection of recipes

Ms. Dufour keeps handwritten and printed recipes from magazines in a binder that she often consults. To her, the recipes are part of the transmission of her family’s food heritage.

Unknown
Dufour family

© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


Two women cooking a beaver tail.

There are all sorts of ways to learn how to cook. For the Dominique family, it is essential to respect animals: “In the forest, we must respect what the earth offers us.” This is why hunted animals are consumed in their entirety. Traditionally, beaver tails are roasted on a stick over embers. When they are fully cooked, the scales are removed and the tails are added to the broths.

Unknown
Dominique family

© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


Someone using a knife sharpener.

Ms. Pelletier takes precious care of this knife sharpener, which once belonged to her grandmother.

Unknown
Pelletier-Yapo family

© 2013, Musée de la civilisation. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

- Discover what characterizes our own food heritage.
- Be aware of family, ethnic, religious and community
characteristics that contribute to the construction of food heritage.
- Understand the relationship between food and the sense of belonging.

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