The context: Mounting an exhibition is a creative process which involves a team of people at a museum in a long-term adventure. Topics and works must be chosen, a connecting thread defined, texts written, works of art borrowed and restored if necessary, decisions taken about how best to display them and their placement in the galleries planned. A virtual exhibition reduces the number of steps, because the works are shown on a computer monitor only. One element remains: which works to choose and how to present them to give meaning to the exhibition.
The exhibition curator is the person who defines the theme of the exhibition and chooses the works to include in it, in collaboration with other members of the museum’s personnel. It is the curator’s job to give meaning to the exhibition.

Materials required:
- A computer with an Internet connection
- Access to the site (address of the virtual exhibition)
- PowerPoint software or equivalent

Getting started:
For primary school st Read More
The context: Mounting an exhibition is a creative process which involves a team of people at a museum in a long-term adventure. Topics and works must be chosen, a connecting thread defined, texts written, works of art borrowed and restored if necessary, decisions taken about how best to display them and their placement in the galleries planned. A virtual exhibition reduces the number of steps, because the works are shown on a computer monitor only. One element remains: which works to choose and how to present them to give meaning to the exhibition.
The exhibition curator is the person who defines the theme of the exhibition and chooses the works to include in it, in collaboration with other members of the museum’s personnel. It is the curator’s job to give meaning to the exhibition.

Materials required:
- A computer with an Internet connection
- Access to the site (address of the virtual exhibition)
- PowerPoint software or equivalent

Getting started:
For primary school students:
The curator game: three of the games on the site let students test their skills as “beginner curators.”

Premises: A museum is a place where collections are shown and preserved. The museum’s curators are in charge of the collections. They are very knowledgeable and wish to make the collections better known. Ask the students if they have the qualities required to become a beginner curator.

A curator is someone pays attention to details. Play the game “Un œil de lynx”(find the differences between two works to discover which is the original) and “Si j’ai bonne mémoire” (make pairs by matching two works in the table).

A curator has to be able to situate a work of art in history. Play the game “Être de son temps” (classify works in order on the timeline).
To the student: Bravo! You have demonstrated that you have the necessary qualities to be a beginner curator, you can choose the works for your virtual exhibition.

For secondary school students:

Play the game “Une question de style” to determine each student’s preferences. (This game, in the form of a psychological questionnaire, is a fun way to find out what people’s tastes are in art.)

Carrying out the project: Creating a mini-exhibition

ACTIVITIES:
1. Explore the site and identify works (between 5 and 10) that the students especially enjoy.
2. Define a connecting thread among the works, a theme that could be used to relate them to each other. What does the student want to say with their selection of work? What do the works have in common? Or would the student prefer to choose very different works in order to bring out particular aspects? Have the student write an introductory text explaining his or her choices.

Here are a few examples of themes to inspire the students (they can also define another theme of their own if they prefer).

a. Ecology and the Environment (Science and Technology)
Down through the ages, human beings have left their mark on the landscape: dwellings, agriculture, industry, pollution, etc. In their works, artists document how the landscape has evolved and the variety of changes that have taken place in the environment. Some go further and express environmental concerns. They may, for example, extol rural life, where people exist in harmony with nature and animals (unlike in industrialized areas), or show us the country’s wilderness, still untouched by human activity. Prepare an exhibition which shows how the themes of the landscape and the environment have inspired artists through the ages.

b. The Transformation of a Society (Culture and Society)
Artists are witnesses to their society. The way they view this society enables us to see how ways of life and attitudes change. For example, the labour people perform has been transformed through the ages: find works which demonstrate this. Some ways of life in Quebec and the rest of Canada have changed, in particular the transition from rural to urban lifestyles. Which works illustrate these major transformations? In addition to acting as a witness, a work of art can also contribute, in its own way, to society’s evolution by introducing new ideas which throw former customs into upheaval. The values of Quebec society have undergone great upheavals, in particular during the Quiet Revolution. Find works which illustrate this transformation of ideas.

c. Show your Colours (Visual Arts)
Colour contributes to our general impression of a work of art, but can also be the principal subject of the work. The way in which the role of colour is viewed, its importance and the way it is applied to the canvas, have changed greatly through the ages. Demonstrate this through a sampling of paintings. In your view, colour plays a primordial role in the work of which artists? Identify works which demonstrate a marked concern for colour.

3. Create a folder to store the works you choose.

4. Review you choices to make sure that they are good examples of the theme.

5. Present your exhibition in class (with a projector) or print it and present it on paper.

Resources:

Virtual exhibition Discover Quebec and Canadian Art

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.

Concentric circles painted in bright colours without depth giving the illusion of an undulating movement on the round canvas.

Claude Tousignant Born in Montreal in 1932 Chromatic Accelerator 3O #2-2/69 1969 Acrylic on canvas 76,6 cm (diam.) Gift of Arthur Ruddy

Claude Tousignant

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Three men and a horse are hauling large blocks of ice out of the frozen river. The horse occupies the centre of of the work.

Horatio Walker Listowel (Ontario) 1858 - Sainte-Petronille (Quebec) 1938 The Ice cutters 1904 Oil on canvas 60,9 x 91, 5 cm Gift of Mrs F.S. Smithers in memory of Charles Francis Smithers

Horatio Walker

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Sunday morning in winter leaving High Mass. In front of the imposing church, the parishioners head for their sleighs.

Kathleen Moir Morris Montreal 1983 - Rawdon, Quebec, 1986 After ''Grand messe '' , Berthier-en-Haut 1927 Oil on canvas 61 x 71 cm Purchase, gift of William J. Morrice

Kathleen Moir Morris

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Multi-coloured abstract painting made up of precise geometric forms painted without depth throughout the entire space.

Fernand Leduc Born in Montreal in 1916 Solar Strata 1958 Oil enamel on canvas 160 x 113,9 cm Purchase, Horsley et Annie Townsend Bequest

Fernand Leduc

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


People appear on both sides of an inverted “u” shape. They walk, climb or slip.

Jessie Oonark Back river area 1906 - Churchill, Manitoba, 1985 Spring Break-up 1970 Stonecut, stencil, 9/40 54,8 x 79 cm Purchase, Horsley et Annie Townsend Bequest

Jessie Oonark

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

Culture and Society (history), language of instruction (English/French), Science and Technology:

• Situate oneself in time: place works of art on a timeline
• Write various texts for different school contexts and disciplines: write an introduction to a work in visual arts
• Communicate while taking into account the person addressed
• Exploit the tools, objects and techniques found in science and technology

Visual Arts:

• Appreciate works of art from our artistic heritage
• Consolidate one’s identity through the appreciation of works of art
• Express one’s critical and esthetical judgment verbally or in writing
• Recognize aspects of oneself in a work of art
• Organize elements resulting from one’s choices according to the chosen theme
• Give an account of one’s creative experience

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