Painting as Subject brings together practices in which the “how” determines the “what” of painting, shaping the work through the use of quotation, gestural language or abstraction. The characteristics of painting itself, as material and as an art form with a history, constitute the very essence of the art.
Painting as Subject brings together practices in which the “how” determines the “what” of painting, shaping the work through the use of quotation, gestural language or abstraction. The characteristics of painting itself, as material and as an art form with a history, constitute the very essence of the art.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Melanie Authier, 2010, acrylic on canvas, push-and-pull

Photo: Martin Golland, courtesy Georgia Scherman Projects, Toronto

Melanie Authier
2010
Acrylic on canvas
182,8 x 213 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Melanie Authier negotiates with oppositions in her practice. Each of her paintings becomes an entity unto itself in which myriad shapes, marks and colours mix and mingle. The compositional density and the bold, saturated colours create a palpable content/form tension and a push-and-pull effect that reverse formal hierarchies and blur the distinction between background and foreground elements. In Scavenger, for example, the blue tones used at the centre of the work form both an atmospheric background, and, in the foreground, a formal, angular motif with precise cut-outs. Around the edges, filamentous chromatic masses meld together in meanders of colour. With skillful handling of the pictorial elements and compositions that fold into themselves, the artist suggests a depth and unfathomable spaces that distort perception by defying conventional spatial logic.
Melanie Authier negotiates with oppositions in her practice. Each of her paintings becomes an entity unto itself in which myriad shapes, marks and colours mix and mingle. The compositional density and the bold, saturated colours create a palpable content/form tension and a push-and-pull effect that reverse formal hierarchies and blur the distinction between background and foreground elements. In Scavenger, for example, the blue tones used at the centre of the work form both an atmospheric background, and, in the foreground, a formal, angular motif with precise cut-outs. Around the edges, filamentous chromatic masses meld together in meanders of colour. With skillful handling of the pictorial elements and compositions that fold into themselves, the artist suggests a depth and unfathomable spaces that distort perception by defying conventional spatial logic.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Jérôme Bouchard, 2011, abstraction, flat colour

Photo: Guy L’Heureux, with the courtesy of Galeries Roger Bellemare and Christian Lambert, Montreal

Jérôme Bouchard

Acrylic on canvas
157,5 x 183 cm
Collection Landriault-Paradis, Montreal
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Jérôme Bouchard represents figures with elusive contours, a characteristic often attributed to the small size, fleeting nature, accumulation or fragmentation of the depicted objects. To produce the painting 46759 pièces/m2, he worked by subtraction, rather than by building up the material. His tools included not just brushes but cutting implements, as seen by the marks on the canvas, and he proceeded like an archaeologist, selecting fragments to be pried away or retained, leaving tiny traces of his actions visible. The scale of whites and greys in this work echoes the shades of light and shadow in the artist’s studio. While some steps of the production process are masked by the areas of flat colour, others are discernible in the imperfectly superimposed layers of paint. The seeming consistency of the image is an illusion, for a close look at the surface reveals the complexity of the interventions.
Jérôme Bouchard represents figures with elusive contours, a characteristic often attributed to the small size, fleeting nature, accumulation or fragmentation of the depicted objects. To produce the painting 46759 pièces/m2, he worked by subtraction, rather than by building up the material. His tools included not just brushes but cutting implements, as seen by the marks on the canvas, and he proceeded like an archaeologist, selecting fragments to be pried away or retained, leaving tiny traces of his actions visible. The scale of whites and greys in this work echoes the shades of light and shadow in the artist’s studio. While some steps of the production process are masked by the areas of flat colour, others are discernible in the imperfectly superimposed layers of paint. The seeming consistency of the image is an illusion, for a close look at the surface reveals the complexity of the interventions.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Anthony Burnham, 2010, history of painting, repentir

Photo: Donald Lee, The Banff Centre, courtesy Galerie René Blouin, Montréal

Anthony Burnham
2010
Oil on canvas
184 x 152 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Anthony Burnham re-examines the practice of painting with works that allude to the history and condition of the medium through the perspective of other media, such as photography or sculpture. Not Yet Titled makes visible the effects of transfer from one medium to another. First, the artist painted a large canvas with the words “The Thing The Thing The Thing” and photographed it in his studio. Next, he covered the canvas with a coat of white paint, allowing a ghostly image of the inscription to show through, like a pentimento. He then photocopied the photograph and reproduced the copy on the canvas, painting it as if set against the photocopied pages of a book held in place by tape. The resulting work emphasizes the reproduction process and suggests a sculptural object: in addition to the trompe l’oeil photocopy, the canvas itself is displayed on two blocks of wood, rather than hung on the wall. Burnham’s exacting method serves to reflect on the painted image, on reality withdrawing into its representation, as if ceding its place to its own copy.
Anthony Burnham re-examines the practice of painting with works that allude to the history and condition of the medium through the perspective of other media, such as photography or sculpture. Not Yet Titled makes visible the effects of transfer from one medium to another. First, the artist painted a large canvas with the words “The Thing The Thing The Thing” and photographed it in his studio. Next, he covered the canvas with a coat of white paint, allowing a ghostly image of the inscription to show through, like a pentimento. He then photocopied the photograph and reproduced the copy on the canvas, painting it as if set against the photocopied pages of a book held in place by tape. The resulting work emphasizes the reproduction process and suggests a sculptural object: in addition to the trompe l’oeil photocopy, the canvas itself is displayed on two blocks of wood, rather than hung on the wall. Burnham’s exacting method serves to reflect on the painted image, on reality withdrawing into its representation, as if ceding its place to its own copy.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Tammi Campbell, hard-edge, acrylic on matboard, 2011

Photo: Tammi Campbell, courtesy Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal

Tammi Campbell
2011
Acrylic on matboard
29,21 x 29,21 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Tammi Campbell uses the mechanics – the materials and tools – of abstract painting to engage in an open conversation with Modernism. She revisits the history of modernist painting and, at the same time, becomes part of it in attempting to give new meaning to certain conventions. Studies (series) is representative of her recently developed strategies. The image suggests that the work is unfinished, that a final line remains to be painted before the masking tape can be removed. But a closer look reveals that the tape is actually a painted trompe l’oeil illusion. Masking tape is generally associated with the hard-edge technique, where it is used as a tool to execute perfectly straight lines and geometric shapes. In representing it here, the artist highlights the production process and challenges the viewer’s power of observation.
Tammi Campbell uses the mechanics – the materials and tools – of abstract painting to engage in an open conversation with Modernism. She revisits the history of modernist painting and, at the same time, becomes part of it in attempting to give new meaning to certain conventions. Studies (series) is representative of her recently developed strategies. The image suggests that the work is unfinished, that a final line remains to be painted before the masking tape can be removed. But a closer look reveals that the tape is actually a painted trompe l’oeil illusion. Masking tape is generally associated with the hard-edge technique, where it is used as a tool to execute perfectly straight lines and geometric shapes. In representing it here, the artist highlights the production process and challenges the viewer’s power of observation.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Paintings of Thomas Chisholm, abstract art, perspective, 2010

Photo: Thomas Chisholm, courtesy the artist

Thomas Chisholm

Enamel on aluminium, 2 elements
122 x 122 cm each
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Thomas Chisholm’s paintings draw attention to the abstract concepts of space and time. They belong to the repertory of forms specific to abstract art and in no way aim to depict recognizable elements from the visible world. Occupying their own space and time, these works prompt viewers to reflect on the way they recognize and understand their personal space-time context. For the series Untitled, the artist used automotive spray enamels, covering the uniformly sized aluminum polygons with multiple layers of pulverized paint particles. The variations from one to the next derive mainly from the play of perspective that creates the illusion of volume and depth, of three dimensions. Despite their flat surfaces, each painting gives the impression of “seeing through space.”
Thomas Chisholm’s paintings draw attention to the abstract concepts of space and time. They belong to the repertory of forms specific to abstract art and in no way aim to depict recognizable elements from the visible world. Occupying their own space and time, these works prompt viewers to reflect on the way they recognize and understand their personal space-time context. For the series Untitled, the artist used automotive spray enamels, covering the uniformly sized aluminum polygons with multiple layers of pulverized paint particles. The variations from one to the next derive mainly from the play of perspective that creates the illusion of volume and depth, of three dimensions. Despite their flat surfaces, each painting gives the impression of “seeing through space.”

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Daniel Hutchinson, 2012, nature, monochrome, formal

Photo: Daniel Hutchinson, courtesy Angell Gallery, Toronto

Daniel Hutchinson
2012
Oil on wood panel
76 x 102 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


This work is part of a series that Daniel Hutchinson produced following a three-month residency on the Swedish island of Gotland, in the Baltic Sea. The series revisits the marine or seascape genre, which depicts maritime views or scenes. Adopting landscape’s horizontal format, A Grey Storm From Above and Below is like a close-up shot of roiling black waves that becomes a pretext for the study of form. No horizon line bisects the painting; instead, the sky and the sea merge in a storm where all bearings have vanished. But once the eye grasps the subject, it is inexorably drawn to the pictorial matter, which captures and reflects the brilliant, textured light. The meticulous, furrowing brushstrokes hollow out the waves and create movement, while the variations of blacks and greys construct the morphology of water in monochrome tones. The result is a constant shift between the figurative and the abstract, between illusionistic space and purely formal space, where everything is on the verge of disintegration.
This work is part of a series that Daniel Hutchinson produced following a three-month residency on the Swedish island of Gotland, in the Baltic Sea. The series revisits the marine or seascape genre, which depicts maritime views or scenes. Adopting landscape’s horizontal format, A Grey Storm From Above and Below is like a close-up shot of roiling black waves that becomes a pretext for the study of form. No horizon line bisects the painting; instead, the sky and the sea merge in a storm where all bearings have vanished. But once the eye grasps the subject, it is inexorably drawn to the pictorial matter, which captures and reflects the brilliant, textured light. The meticulous, furrowing brushstrokes hollow out the waves and create movement, while the variations of blacks and greys construct the morphology of water in monochrome tones. The result is a constant shift between the figurative and the abstract, between illusionistic space and purely formal space, where everything is on the verge of disintegration.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Chris Kline, 2011, abstraction, stretcher, poplin

Photo: Richard-Max Tremblay, courtesy Galerie René Blouin, Montreal

Chris Kline
2011
Acrylic and pigment on poplin, wood stretcher
183 x 183 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Chris Kline’s art draws on the legacy of Modernist abstraction, using a formal vocabulary but taking a poetic approach. For Divider 1, the artist chose to make the stretcher visible, thus blurring the distinction between front and back. Two narrow vertical bars are painted on the translucent canvas of untreated cotton poplin. Their perfectly straight edges suggest the use of masking tape. Along the bottom of the canvas appear traces of pigment, as if the support had grazed a surface of coloured water and absorbed the suspended particles. Subtly, delicately, the painting shifts the viewer’s perception back and forth, alternating between scrutiny of the pigment and acrylic on the surface and awareness of the structure dimly discernible behind it. The simplicity that results from this radical economy of means heightens the work’s visual impact.
Chris Kline’s art draws on the legacy of Modernist abstraction, using a formal vocabulary but taking a poetic approach. For Divider 1, the artist chose to make the stretcher visible, thus blurring the distinction between front and back. Two narrow vertical bars are painted on the translucent canvas of untreated cotton poplin. Their perfectly straight edges suggest the use of masking tape. Along the bottom of the canvas appear traces of pigment, as if the support had grazed a surface of coloured water and absorbed the suspended particles. Subtly, delicately, the painting shifts the viewer’s perception back and forth, alternating between scrutiny of the pigment and acrylic on the surface and awareness of the structure dimly discernible behind it. The simplicity that results from this radical economy of means heightens the work’s visual impact.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of François Lacasse, 2011, all-over, support, abstraction

Photo: Richard-Max Tremblay, courtesy Galerie René Blouin, Montreal

François Lacasse
2011
Oil on canvas
137,2 x 160 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


François Lacasse explores the physical properties of paint and assigns colour a structuring role. For the production of Compilation mixte IV, he defined a precise protocol involving no brushwork: First, prepare the selected colours; next, measure out and apply the paint directly from the tube onto the unprimed canvas support; lastly, repeat each coloured line elsewhere on the surface, using a thin plastic film to lift and transfer the excess matter. The technique is similar to printmaking in this respect and owes its effectiveness to the viscosity of the oil paint. The all-over application method lends itself to flexible, improvised compositions and allows the artist to explore relationships between colours.
François Lacasse explores the physical properties of paint and assigns colour a structuring role. For the production of Compilation mixte IV, he defined a precise protocol involving no brushwork: First, prepare the selected colours; next, measure out and apply the paint directly from the tube onto the unprimed canvas support; lastly, repeat each coloured line elsewhere on the surface, using a thin plastic film to lift and transfer the excess matter. The technique is similar to printmaking in this respect and owes its effectiveness to the viscosity of the oil paint. The all-over application method lends itself to flexible, improvised compositions and allows the artist to explore relationships between colours.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Jean-François Lauda, 2011, visual language, pentimenti, abstraction

Photo: Éliane Excoffier, courtesy the artist

Jean-François Lauda
2011
Oil on canvas
38 x 43 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Flecks of painted light dapple the image surface like natural light reflecting off the canvas. Jean-François Lauda’s art denotes a spontaneous, intuitive relationship to the nature of his materials. Though this recent exploratory piece is more geometric and formal than the works of earlier series, the elements are animated by a visual language seemingly drawn directly from observed reality. FDC 34 shows numerous pentimenti, small patches of colour visible through the overpainting. The series title, Fait de concentré, reflects a process based on experimentation, meaning that it occasionally requires alterations. The compositions are structurally improvised and imprecise, since the artist intuits the final unity only at the very end, before the elements collapse.
Flecks of painted light dapple the image surface like natural light reflecting off the canvas. Jean-François Lauda’s art denotes a spontaneous, intuitive relationship to the nature of his materials. Though this recent exploratory piece is more geometric and formal than the works of earlier series, the elements are animated by a visual language seemingly drawn directly from observed reality. FDC 34 shows numerous pentimenti, small patches of colour visible through the overpainting. The series title, Fait de concentré, reflects a process based on experimentation, meaning that it occasionally requires alterations. The compositions are structurally improvised and imprecise, since the artist intuits the final unity only at the very end, before the elements collapse.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Elizabeth McIntosh, abstraction, hard-edge, pentimenti, 2010

Photo: Scott Massey, courtesy Diaz Contemporary, Toronto

Elizabeth McIntosh
2010
Oil on canvas
190 x 229 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Fine white horizontal lines punctuate the picture plane over and over. The irregular stripes suggest a brush moving freehand across the surface, the way the eyes read a text. Rhythmically divided into rectangles of various sizes, the space becomes infinitely expandable. Elizabeth McIntosh sees the canvas not as a finite universe but as a two-dimensional space that can be endlessly revisited and reworked. In fact, she places great importance on her pentimenti and undertakes each work with no pre-set rule or idea of what it will eventually look like. In recent years she has explored the possibilities of abstract painting and the legacy of Modernism, but not within the dictates of hard-edge abstraction. She often begins with a fragment from a historical painting and attempts to restate or inflect the motifs by adding, revising and rebuilding layers of forms and colours. This creates a dialogue between past and present and allows the work to develop according to its own internal logic, where each form can freely shift back and forth between abstraction and figurative evocation.
Fine white horizontal lines punctuate the picture plane over and over. The irregular stripes suggest a brush moving freehand across the surface, the way the eyes read a text. Rhythmically divided into rectangles of various sizes, the space becomes infinitely expandable. Elizabeth McIntosh sees the canvas not as a finite universe but as a two-dimensional space that can be endlessly revisited and reworked. In fact, she places great importance on her pentimenti and undertakes each work with no pre-set rule or idea of what it will eventually look like. In recent years she has explored the possibilities of abstract painting and the legacy of Modernism, but not within the dictates of hard-edge abstraction. She often begins with a fragment from a historical painting and attempts to restate or inflect the motifs by adding, revising and rebuilding layers of forms and colours. This creates a dialogue between past and present and allows the work to develop according to its own internal logic, where each form can freely shift back and forth between abstraction and figurative evocation.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Ben Reeves, 2011, impasto, self-referential, oil, portrait

Photo: Ben Reeves, courtesy Equinox Gallery, Vancouver, and Jessica Bradley Art + Projects, Toronto

Ben Reeves
2011
Oil on burlap mounted on wood panel
61 x 73,7 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Ben Reeves’s favourite subjects are inspired by scenes of daily life and represented as if seen through the lens of a camera. To create this photographic illusion in paint, Reeves typically dots his foregrounds with what appear to be raindrops splashed on the lens. And to generate tension between representation and abstraction, he zooms in on areas of past paintings. Detail – Laurel Street is part of a new series of works whose motifs are at once hyper-figurative and abstract. It is an enlarged detail of a scene set on Laurel Street, in the artist’s neighbourhood. He has framed one of the raindrops from that scene and reproduced it using thick daubs of paint and heavy brushstrokes. The painting is thus self-referential, in that the earlier work has become the subject of new exploration. The impasto lends the motif a physical presence: like a tiny lens, the droplet of water refracts the ambient light and the colours of its surroundings.
Ben Reeves’s favourite subjects are inspired by scenes of daily life and represented as if seen through the lens of a camera. To create this photographic illusion in paint, Reeves typically dots his foregrounds with what appear to be raindrops splashed on the lens. And to generate tension between representation and abstraction, he zooms in on areas of past paintings. Detail – Laurel Street is part of a new series of works whose motifs are at once hyper-figurative and abstract. It is an enlarged detail of a scene set on Laurel Street, in the artist’s neighbourhood. He has framed one of the raindrops from that scene and reproduced it using thick daubs of paint and heavy brushstrokes. The painting is thus self-referential, in that the earlier work has become the subject of new exploration. The impasto lends the motif a physical presence: like a tiny lens, the droplet of water refracts the ambient light and the colours of its surroundings.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Francine Savard, abstraction, 2010, quotations, flat colour

Photo: Guy L’Heureux, courtesy Galerie René Blouin, Montreal, and Diaz Contemporary, Toronto

Francine Savard
2010
Acrylic on canvas
10,2 x 83,8 x 3,8 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


« Je suis seule ici, bien à l’abri » [I am alone here, safe and sheltered]
Alain Robbe-Grillet’s novel Dans le labyrinthe begins with this statement, which Francine Savard has transposed from the literary to the visual realm. As a title for the series, she chose the word “incipit,” meaning the opening phrases of a text, and for each of the paintings, she took the first sentence of a novel considered a classic of European literature. The incipits were selected so that, when assembled in a certain order, they would form a text personal to the artist. She then transliterated the phrases from linguistic to chromatic form; that is, she converted the quotations by representing each occurrence of a word with the same colour. The length of each area of flat colour is proportionate to the length of the word, while a white space represents a punctuation mark. In this system, where the colours are positioned like the words in the sentence, vocabulary and colour are one and the same. Here, as in the rest of the series, the artist’s aim is not to render the original sentence literally but to convey its rhy Read More
« Je suis seule ici, bien à l’abri » [I am alone here, safe and sheltered]
Alain Robbe-Grillet’s novel Dans le labyrinthe begins with this statement, which Francine Savard has transposed from the literary to the visual realm. As a title for the series, she chose the word “incipit,” meaning the opening phrases of a text, and for each of the paintings, she took the first sentence of a novel considered a classic of European literature. The incipits were selected so that, when assembled in a certain order, they would form a text personal to the artist. She then transliterated the phrases from linguistic to chromatic form; that is, she converted the quotations by representing each occurrence of a word with the same colour. The length of each area of flat colour is proportionate to the length of the word, while a white space represents a punctuation mark. In this system, where the colours are positioned like the words in the sentence, vocabulary and colour are one and the same. Here, as in the rest of the series, the artist’s aim is not to render the original sentence literally but to convey its rhythm with the colour sequence.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Justin Stephens, abstraction, canvas, 2011

Photo: Guy L’Heureux, courtesy of Parisian Laundry, Montreal

Justin Stephens
2011
Acrylic, staples and CD fragments on canvas
183 x 152 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Justin Stephens’s approach to painting is experimental, allowing his strategies, materials and outcomes to vary from painting to painting. He prioritizes process over final results, which informs his methodology of working, reworking, scraping away, and adding or subtracting diverse materials and objects. Sublimation No-No reveals the reactions that have transformed and altered the canvas, as if the various manipulations had corroded the paint surface, washing out the colour and leaving behind small, clinging debris (staples, bits of CDs). From a distance the fragments look like mother-of-pearl. At once arbitrary and controlled, the artist’s works call attention to their material reality, presenting themselves as textures, colours, objects. They are the outcome of intuitive actions that produce sudden, unexpected effects.
Justin Stephens’s approach to painting is experimental, allowing his strategies, materials and outcomes to vary from painting to painting. He prioritizes process over final results, which informs his methodology of working, reworking, scraping away, and adding or subtracting diverse materials and objects. Sublimation No-No reveals the reactions that have transformed and altered the canvas, as if the various manipulations had corroded the paint surface, washing out the colour and leaving behind small, clinging debris (staples, bits of CDs). From a distance the fragments look like mother-of-pearl. At once arbitrary and controlled, the artist’s works call attention to their material reality, presenting themselves as textures, colours, objects. They are the outcome of intuitive actions that produce sudden, unexpected effects.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Beth Stuart, Surrealist, abstract, figurative, stretcher

Photo: Éliane Excoffier, courtesy Battat Contemporary, Montreal, and Erin Stump Projects, Toronto

Beth Stuart
2010
Oil on plastered linen on panel
43 x 36 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Beth Stuart’s painting is marked by a strange relationship with reality largely influenced by Surrealist literature. Residing in the interstitial realm between painting and sculpture, Scanty Shanty is neither wholly abstract nor truly figurative. Its title is equivocal and its meaning mysterious. It suggests a shack with a chimney puffing airy smoke, but, despite the title’s hint at a form of representation, the nature of the subject remains unclear. The picture calls to mind paradoxical representations that generate ambiguity. The application of the paint and the irregular shape of the stretcher convey a certain awkwardness, but Stuart’s command of inelegance may be precisely what separates her work from the obvious and the conventional.
Beth Stuart’s painting is marked by a strange relationship with reality largely influenced by Surrealist literature. Residing in the interstitial realm between painting and sculpture, Scanty Shanty is neither wholly abstract nor truly figurative. Its title is equivocal and its meaning mysterious. It suggests a shack with a chimney puffing airy smoke, but, despite the title’s hint at a form of representation, the nature of the subject remains unclear. The picture calls to mind paradoxical representations that generate ambiguity. The application of the paint and the irregular shape of the stretcher convey a certain awkwardness, but Stuart’s command of inelegance may be precisely what separates her work from the obvious and the conventional.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Paintings of Julie Trudel, composition, palette, abstraction, 2011

Photo: Julie Trudel, courtesy the Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal

Julie Trudel
2011
Acrylic and silkscreen ink on plywood
74 x 463 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Julie Trudel’s approach to painting demands time and painstaking care. She works within strict, self-imposed parameters that define a restricted colour palette, an application process and a composition principle yet afford an abundance of possibilities. The resulting serial works explore the range of possible interactions among the purposely chosen elements. In Tondos CMY en déplacement, the artist plays on the CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow and black) colour model used in full-colour printing, this time excluding the black. Each of the paintings features the same concentric motif but differs in terms of size and the portion of the form shown. Together, they compose the movement suggested by the title, with the visual elements shifting from one tondo to the next. The colours, heavily diluted silkscreen inks, are applied drop by drop and run into each other to form a luminous colour chart.
Julie Trudel’s approach to painting demands time and painstaking care. She works within strict, self-imposed parameters that define a restricted colour palette, an application process and a composition principle yet afford an abundance of possibilities. The resulting serial works explore the range of possible interactions among the purposely chosen elements. In Tondos CMY en déplacement, the artist plays on the CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow and black) colour model used in full-colour printing, this time excluding the black. Each of the paintings features the same concentric motif but differs in terms of size and the portion of the form shown. Together, they compose the movement suggested by the title, with the visual elements shifting from one tondo to the next. The colours, heavily diluted silkscreen inks, are applied drop by drop and run into each other to form a luminous colour chart.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

Appreciate works of art
Learn and use vocabulary appropriate to contemporary art

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