Emily Carr found that by verbally describing her subject before she began painting or drawing, she could heighten her visual acuity, and thereby expand her painter's vocabulary. Ask students to begin by choosing a subject for their artwork, and then to initiate their investigations by describing or "wording" what they see using the richest language possible; this will not be read by anyone else, and can be very personal. Students might want to ask themselves, as Emily Carr did, “What attracted you to this particular subject?” and “What do you want to express with it?”1 This freely written description then becomes additional material for their artwork, either stimulating media applications or used as linguistic devices in conjunction with visual symbols; finished work includes any material students feel is appropriate.
Emily Carr found that by verbally describing her subject before she began painting or drawing, she could heighten her visual acuity, and thereby expand her painter's vocabulary. Ask students to begin by choosing a subject for their artwork, and then to initiate their investigations by describing or "wording" what they see using the richest language possible; this will not be read by anyone else, and can be very personal. Students might want to ask themselves, as Emily Carr did, “What attracted you to this particular subject?” and “What do you want to express with it?”1 This freely written description then becomes additional material for their artwork, either stimulating media applications or used as linguistic devices in conjunction with visual symbols; finished work includes any material students feel is appropriate.
1Maria Tippet, Emily Carr: A Biography, (Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1979), 186.
© 2007, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. All Rights Reserved.

"Trying to find equivalents for things in words helps me find equivalents in painting. That is the reason for this journal. Everything is all connected up. Different paths lead to the great "it", the thing we try to get at …"1

"Trying to find equivalents for things in words helps me find equivalents in painting. That is the reason for this journal. Everything is all connected up. Different paths lead to the great "it", the thing we try to get at …"1

1Emily Carr, Hundreds and Thousands, (Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 2006), 46.


© 2006, Douglas & McIntyre. All Rights Reserved;

"I want the ferocious, strangled lonesomeness of that place, creepy, nervy, forsaken, dank, dirty, dilapidated, the rank smell of nettles and rotting wood, the lush greens of the rank sea grass and the overgrown bushes, and the great dense forest behind full of unseen things and great silence, and on the sea the sun beating down …"1
"I want the ferocious, strangled lonesomeness of that place, creepy, nervy, forsaken, dank, dirty, dilapidated, the rank smell of nettles and rotting wood, the lush greens of the rank sea grass and the overgrown bushes, and the great dense forest behind full of unseen things and great silence, and on the sea the sun beating down …"1
1Emily Carr, The Complete Writings of Emily Carr with Introduction by Doris Shadbolt, (Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 1997), 672.
© 1993, Douglas & McIntyre. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

Curriculum Link (BC) – English Language Arts; Social Studies; Visual Arts; Art Foundations; Information Technology 9/10

Learning Objectives: 
· After reading various quotes from Carr’s novels and journals students will compare the themes, purposes, and appeal of different communications – biography, autobiography, journal, story etc.
· After reading the various quotes from Carr’s writings students will identify connections between their own ideas, experiences, and knowledge and a variety of literary and mass media works created by classroom, local, British Columbian, and international authors and developers from various cultural communities.
· Students will use their senses to perceive the world and respond to images and the ways in which they reflect the personal, social, cultural, and historical contexts in which they were created.
· Students will experience and analyze how the physical qualities of visual elements and principles of art and design are used to create effects and mood in representational and non-representational images.
· Students will examine the relationship between the use of particular image-development strategies and intended mood and message.
· Students will be able to describe the contributions that Emily Carr has made to the arts in Canada.
· This learning object will allow students to demonstrate their ability to use the Internet to access, capture, and store information.
· Students will use information technology tools to gather and organize information and produce documents.
· By interacting with this object students will demonstrate an awareness of the impact of electronic resources on education, careers, and recreation.

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