The process of working outdoors, or 'en plein air’ has been around for centuries, although never more fully embraced than by the Barbizon school of French Realism at the turn of the 19th century. Emily Carr shared in that tradition by working directly from nature, from the First Nations villages of her youth (usually painted in watercolour), to the local Victoria landscapes of her mature work (oil paint thinned with gasoline).
Invite students to take their sketchbooks and favourite drawing tools and find a particular aspect of the exterior landscape that appeals to them. They will then complete a finished work in a single sitting; the vitality captured through the spontaneity of such work will illustrate the value of not over-working.

The process of working outdoors, or 'en plein air’ has been around for centuries, although never more fully embraced than by the Barbizon school of French Realism at the turn of the 19th century. Emily Carr shared in that tradition by working directly from nature, from the First Nations villages of her youth (usually painted in watercolour), to the local Victoria landscapes of her mature work (oil paint thinned with gasoline).
Invite students to take their sketchbooks and favourite drawing tools and find a particular aspect of the exterior landscape that appeals to them. They will then complete a finished work in a single sitting; the vitality captured through the spontaneity of such work will illustrate the value of not over-working.

© 2007, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. All Rights Reserved.

"Outdoor study was as different from studio study as eating is from drinking … Sketching outdoors was a fluid process, half looking, half dreaming, awaiting invitation from the spirit of the subject to 'come meet me half way'. Outdoor sketching was as much longing as labour. "1
"Outdoor study was as different from studio study as eating is from drinking … Sketching outdoors was a fluid process, half looking, half dreaming, awaiting invitation from the spirit of the subject to 'come meet me half way'. Outdoor sketching was as much longing as labour. "1
1Emily Carr, The Complete Writings of Emily Carr with Introduction by Doris Shadbolt, (Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 1997), 315.
© 1997, Douglas & McIntyre. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

Curriculum Link (BC) – English Language Arts; Social Studies; Visual Arts; Art Foundations; Information Technology 9/10

Learning Objectives:
· After reading various quotes from Carr’s novels and journals students will compare the themes, purposes, and appeal of different communications – biography, autobiography, journal, story etc.
· After reading the various quotes from Carr’s writings students will identify connections between their own ideas, experiences, and knowledge and a variety of literary and mass media works created by classroom, local, British Columbian, and international authors and developers from various cultural communities.
· Students will use their senses to perceive the world and respond to images and the ways in which they reflect the personal, social, cultural, and historical contexts in which they were created.
· Students will experience and analyze how the physical qualities of visual elements and principles of art and design are used to create effects and mood in representational and non-representational images.
· Students will examine the relationship between the use of particular image-development strategies and intended mood and message.
· Students will be able to describe the contributions that Emily Carr has made to the arts in Canada.
· This learning object will allow students to demonstrate their ability to use the Internet to access, capture, and store information.
· Students will use information technology tools to gather and organize information and produce documents.
· By interacting with this object students will demonstrate an awareness of the impact of electronic resources on education, careers, and recreation.

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