Portrait of Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pieth Tow

Christianized ‘Brant’, this young man died shortly after returning to North America. His dodem is the Bear. The artist (John Verelst) was obviously intrigued by his tattoos, which he painted in great detail. Brant was the grandfather of Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea), the famous Mohawk leader and general who assisted the British in the American Revolution and in their continuing struggles with France.

John Verelst (ca. 1648-1734)
c. 1710
C-092419
© Library and Archives Canada / Portrait Gallery of Canada


Portrait of Ho Nee Yeath Taw No Row.  Image includes painting and frame.

Also of the Wolf clan, he was Christianized ‘John’. He holds a bow in his hand. While in England, the four men apparently volunteered to stalk deer on the royal hunting preserve and kill one with their bare hands.

John Verelst (circa 1648-1734)
c. 1710
C-092417
© Library and Archives Canada / Portrait Gallery of Canada


Portrait of Etow Oh Koam. Image includes painting and frame.

Christianized ‘Nicholas’, his dodem is the tortoise. He carries a club in his hand and a sword at his waist. There is very little information about what happened to Etow Oh Koam after he returned to North America.

John Verelst (circa 1648-1734)
c. 1710
C-092421
© Library and Archives Canada / Portrait Gallery of Canada


Portrait of Tee Yee Neen Ho Ga Row. Image includes painting and frame.

His name was Christianized to ‘Hendrick’. He is shown with his dodem, the Wolf. Of the four, he looks the most European: short hair, black clothing, European-style shoes and a lack of visible tattoos. He holds a wampum belt in his hand, which symbolizes the official transactions between his people and the British Crown. After this visit to London, Hendrick continued to be an ambassador for the Mohawk people.

John Verelst (circa 1648-1734)
c. 1710
C-092415
© Library and Archives Canada / Portrait Gallery of Canada


Learning Objectives

These images encourage students to learn more about Canadian history during the period that the four kings visited England (1710), and to understand the complex and changing relationship between North America and the prevailing European superpowers of the day, specifically England and France.

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