Crime Photography

Camera, case and tripod, 1903.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1903
1996 - 1173
© Musée de la civilisation


Around 1930, the Laboratory staff consisted of five employees. There was the director, Dr. Derome, and his assistant from 1924 on, Rosario Fontaine, both graduates in forensic medicine and toxicology from the University of Paris. In 1919, the director hired a pharmaceutical chemist, Franchère Pépin, who specialized in toxicology. The latter worked on developing analytical methods for the extraction, detection and identification of toxic materials in biological environments, as well as methods of examination and analysis for conducting an objective study of the traces and clues left on a crime scene. In 1920, the laboratory team added a photographer specializing in crime photography, since Dr. Derome was convinced that such a specialist could help identify the position of a corpse, the condition of clothes after a struggle, and the position and nature of neighbouring items. The team was rounded out by a technician, who performed various tasks at the director’s request.
Around 1930, the Laboratory staff consisted of five employees. There was the director, Dr. Derome, and his assistant from 1924 on, Rosario Fontaine, both graduates in forensic medicine and toxicology from the University of Paris. In 1919, the director hired a pharmaceutical chemist, Franchère Pépin, who specialized in toxicology. The latter worked on developing analytical methods for the extraction, detection and identification of toxic materials in biological environments, as well as methods of examination and analysis for conducting an objective study of the traces and clues left on a crime scene. In 1920, the laboratory team added a photographer specializing in crime photography, since Dr. Derome was convinced that such a specialist could help identify the position of a corpse, the condition of clothes after a struggle, and the position and nature of neighbouring items. The team was rounded out by a technician, who performed various tasks at the director’s request.

© 1998, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

In addition to possessing a vast reference library, the Montreal laboratory is equipped with a variety of instruments used to carry out the most frequently required analyses :
 microscope  microscope for the comparison of bullets  microspherometer  platform scale  precision scale  heating plate  emission spectrograph
In addition to possessing a vast reference library, the Montreal laboratory is equipped with a variety of instruments used to carry out the most frequently required analyses :
  •  microscope
  •  microscope for the comparison of bullets
  •  microspherometer
  •  platform scale
  •  precision scale
  •  heating plate
  •  emission spectrograph

© 1998, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Microscope

Olympus microscope, 1970.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1970
1996 - 1174
© Musée de la civilisation


Microscope for the Comparison of Bullets

Binocular microscope used for ballistics analyses, 1950

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1950
1996 - 1175
© Musée de la civilisation


Microspherometer

Microspherometer: device used to analyse projectiles, 1926.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1926
1996 - 1176
© Musée de la civilisation


Platform Scale

Platform scale, Henry Troeminer Maker, 1930.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1930
1996 - 1172
© Musée de la civilisation


Precision Scale

Precision scale, 1955.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1930
1996 - 1177
© Musée de la civilisation


Heating Plate

Electric heating plate, 1924.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1924
1996 - 1227
© Musée de la civilisation


Emission Spectrograph

Emission spectrograph manufactured by Bausch & Lomb.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1950
242 x 164.5 x 58.5 cm
1996 - 1178
© Musée de la civilisation


The laboratory team sought to identify the victim, the date and time of the crime, and the cause of the injuries or death. They tested for poisons, residues, stains or biological substances (nails, hair, etc.). They studied hand-written and typed documents to identify the author. Lastly, ballistics analyses, fingerprint analyses and tool mark analyses were most common.

Very early on, the laboratory’s founders were aware of the need to share their knowledge and prepare the next generation of forensic scientists. Thus, during the first few years they created a museum to showcase anatomical models, instruments and various items associated with criminal cases that were making headlines. The museum also served as a classroom.
The laboratory team sought to identify the victim, the date and time of the crime, and the cause of the injuries or death. They tested for poisons, residues, stains or biological substances (nails, hair, etc.). They studied hand-written and typed documents to identify the author. Lastly, ballistics analyses, fingerprint analyses and tool mark analyses were most common.

Very early on, the laboratory’s founders were aware of the need to share their knowledge and prepare the next generation of forensic scientists. Thus, during the first few years they created a museum to showcase anatomical models, instruments and various items associated with criminal cases that were making headlines. The museum also served as a classroom.

© 1998, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Reconstructed Crime Scene

Album page showing a reconstructed crime scene, 1922-1952.

Musée de la civilisation
1922 - 1952
1996 - 1183
© Musée de la civilisation


Analysis of Authentic Handwriting

Analysis of authentic handwriting.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1940
© Musée de la civilisation


Ballistics Analysis Photo

Ballistics analysis photo.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1931
1996 - 1228
© Musée de la civilisation


Shoe and Footprint Plaster Mold

Specially rigged shoe and footprint plaster mold.

Musée de la civilisation
c. 1933
1996 - 1214
© Musée de la civilisation


Anatomical Models

Example of anatomical models kept at the laboratory as a reference collection 1960-1970.

Musée de la civilisation
1960 - 1970
1996 - 1217
© Musée de la civilisation


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop enthusiasm and continuing interest in the study of science
  • Identify and appreciate the way history and culture shape a society’s science and technology
  • Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present and appreciate their impact on individuals and societies

Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans