Telegram instructing The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.) to mobilize for service, September 1939.

Telegram instructing The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.) to mobilize for service, September 1939.

photo: Ken Reynolds
1939-09-01
© The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa Regimental Museum


First Battalion R22er

Photo 11 November 1939 1st Battalion, R22eR marching down the Grande-Allée in Quebec City prior to the departure of the troops.

Photo: W.B. Edwards
1939-11-11
City of Québec and Region, CANADA
© Musée du Royal 22e Régiment


When the Second World War broke out, all of Canada’s permanent army units and most of its Militia units were mobilized for active service. For example, during the afternoon of September 1, 1939, the Commander of Military District No. 3 ordered Lieutenant-Colonel G.H. Rogers, Commanding Officer of The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.), to mobilize his regiment.

November 11, 1939: Armistice Day. In Quebec City, the Royal 22e Régiment paraded down the Grande-Allée before the departure of troops for the war. The regiment became a unit of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division and left for England on December 8, 1939. During the Second World War a total of 5,294 officers and men served in the Royal 22e Régiment and its members were awarded 186 decorations, including one Victoria Cross.
When the Second World War broke out, all of Canada’s permanent army units and most of its Militia units were mobilized for active service. For example, during the afternoon of September 1, 1939, the Commander of Military District No. 3 ordered Lieutenant-Colonel G.H. Rogers, Commanding Officer of The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.), to mobilize his regiment.

November 11, 1939: Armistice Day. In Quebec City, the Royal 22e Régiment paraded down the Grande-Allée before the departure of troops for the war. The regiment became a unit of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division and left for England on December 8, 1939. During the Second World War a total of 5,294 officers and men served in the Royal 22e Régiment and its members were awarded 186 decorations, including one Victoria Cross.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

One of the most valuable training techniques to which Canadian soldiers in Great Britain were exposed was battle drill. Developed by British Lieutenant-General H.R.L. Alexander, battle drill was designed to allow men of all ranks to use their imagination and develop skills when placed in difficult, realistic situations. In 1941, Lieutenant-Colonel Fred Scott, Commanding Officer of The Calgary Highlanders, had the opportunity to view a battle drill demonstration by the 47th London Division. Highly impressed, Scott began battle drill training in his own battalion. He eventually established a battle school for the regiment at Burnt Wood near Bexhill, England. The school was extremely successful and many other units sent their troops there as a result. By 1942 battle drill had been adopted as tactical training for platoons in the Canadian corps.
One of the most valuable training techniques to which Canadian soldiers in Great Britain were exposed was battle drill. Developed by British Lieutenant-General H.R.L. Alexander, battle drill was designed to allow men of all ranks to use their imagination and develop skills when placed in difficult, realistic situations. In 1941, Lieutenant-Colonel Fred Scott, Commanding Officer of The Calgary Highlanders, had the opportunity to view a battle drill demonstration by the 47th London Division. Highly impressed, Scott began battle drill training in his own battalion. He eventually established a battle school for the regiment at Burnt Wood near Bexhill, England. The school was extremely successful and many other units sent their troops there as a result. By 1942 battle drill had been adopted as tactical training for platoons in the Canadian corps.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Battle Drill School

The Battle Drill School, January 30, 1942. Major Bruce McKenzie, who donated the photograph, wrote on the back: "Waiting for the signal to go over the top. We walked up the canal for about 1/2 mile."

Major Bruce McKenzie
1942-01-30
© The Calgary Highlanders Regimental Museum and Archives.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Army in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Identify key locations in which Canada’s military operated during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by Canadian soldiers

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