Detail of Great Escape tunnel.

Detail of Great Escape tunnel. Wooden trolley used to remove dirt. "KLIM" milk tins provided air from surface. Tapping into the camp electricity, the POWs ran lights through the tunnel.

Pilot Officer Wally Floody for the RCAF Memorial Museum.

© RCAF Memorial Museum.


Flying Spitfires with 401 Squadron, Pilot Officer Wally Floody was shot down on his maiden flight over St. Omer, France in late October 1941. Captured and sent to the German prisoner of war camp Stalag Luft III, he joined the men of the Great Escape and became known as the "Tunnel King".

Built by Wally Floody, the "Tunnel King", the RCAF Memorial Museum’s Great Escape Tunnel shows the confined space in which the tunnellers from Stalag Luft III had to work.

It also demonstrates some of their more ingenious inventions such as the bellows made of kitbag canvas and the air ventilation system made from
KLIM cans.
Flying Spitfires with 401 Squadron, Pilot Officer Wally Floody was shot down on his maiden flight over St. Omer, France in late October 1941. Captured and sent to the German prisoner of war camp Stalag Luft III, he joined the men of the Great Escape and became known as the "Tunnel King".

Built by Wally Floody, the "Tunnel King", the RCAF Memorial Museum’s Great Escape Tunnel shows the confined space in which the tunnellers from Stalag Luft III had to work.

It also demonstrates some of their more ingenious inventions such as the bellows made of kitbag canvas and the air ventilation system made from
KLIM cans.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

After qualifying as a pilot in 1939, A.C. Hull served at various training stations in Canada until 1943 when he went overseas. Joining No. 420 Squadron, he flew Halifax bombers with No.6 (RCAF) Group in Bomber Command. He later flew Lancaster bombers after taking over command of No. 428 Squadron.

Lieutenant-General Hull had an equally illustrious post-war career serving forty-one years until his retirement in 1974.
After qualifying as a pilot in 1939, A.C. Hull served at various training stations in Canada until 1943 when he went overseas. Joining No. 420 Squadron, he flew Halifax bombers with No.6 (RCAF) Group in Bomber Command. He later flew Lancaster bombers after taking over command of No. 428 Squadron.

Lieutenant-General Hull had an equally illustrious post-war career serving forty-one years until his retirement in 1974.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Clarence Dunlap received his flight training in 1928 and served in the fledgling Royal Canadian Air Force until the outbreak of war in 1939. After commanding the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan station at Mountainview, Ontario, he joined Mediterranean Air Command as the Commanding Officer of No. 331 Wing and participated in the air campaign against Italy and Sicily.

After serving thirty-nine years, most notably as the Chief of the Air Staff and as Deputy Commander of NORAD, Air Marshal Dunlap retired in 1966.
Clarence Dunlap received his flight training in 1928 and served in the fledgling Royal Canadian Air Force until the outbreak of war in 1939. After commanding the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan station at Mountainview, Ontario, he joined Mediterranean Air Command as the Commanding Officer of No. 331 Wing and participated in the air campaign against Italy and Sicily.

After serving thirty-nine years, most notably as the Chief of the Air Staff and as Deputy Commander of NORAD, Air Marshal Dunlap retired in 1966.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Volunteering with No. 1 (Fighter) Squadron (later 401 Squadron), Royal Canadian Air Force, Bob Norris flew Hurricane fighters during the Battle of Britain.

He later commanded No. 125 Squadron and, after a brief return to Canada, flew Lancaster bombers as Commanding Officer of No. 424 Squadron. Today he is 424 Squadron’s Honorary Colonel.
Volunteering with No. 1 (Fighter) Squadron (later 401 Squadron), Royal Canadian Air Force, Bob Norris flew Hurricane fighters during the Battle of Britain.

He later commanded No. 125 Squadron and, after a brief return to Canada, flew Lancaster bombers as Commanding Officer of No. 424 Squadron. Today he is 424 Squadron’s Honorary Colonel.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Squadron-Leader Don McIntyre served in Bomber Command during the Second World War, flying missions against the German cities of Cologne, Essen and Berlin and the German-held city of Brest and participating in the low level bombing attack on the German battleship Tirpitz in Norway. Forced to ditch his badly damaged aircraft during the latter attack, McIntyre made a dramatic escape into Sweden and eventually returned to service
Squadron-Leader Don McIntyre served in Bomber Command during the Second World War, flying missions against the German cities of Cologne, Essen and Berlin and the German-held city of Brest and participating in the low level bombing attack on the German battleship Tirpitz in Norway. Forced to ditch his badly damaged aircraft during the latter attack, McIntyre made a dramatic escape into Sweden and eventually returned to service

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Air Force in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Identify key locations in which Canada’s Air Force operated during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by the Canadian Air Force



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