The Vancouver Arena was built in 1911 and opened on December 28th of that year. The Patrick brothers, Frank and Lester, felt that it was in the best interests of their new league, the Pacific Coast Hockey Association, to have the buildings built and operated by the team owners. The Vancouver Arena was built for $210,000 and was when it opened the world’s largest artificial ice surface in the world. This impressive building also seated an incredible ten thousand five hundred spectators, which the comprised ten percent of the entire urban population of Vancouver. The building was home to the PCHA’s Vancouver Millionaires as well as the Vancouver Maroons and the Vancouver Lions. However, its capacity was never close to being reached for the PCHA games and the league would last only a little over a decade before folding. The Western Canada Hockey League assumed two of the franchises from the now defunct PCHA, and the Vancouver Maroons continued to call the building home until its demise in 1926. A different WHL would surface in the mid-forties with a Vancouver club part of it.

The Vancouver Arena was built in 1911 and opened on December 28th of that year. The Patrick brothers, Frank and Lester, felt that it was in the best interests of their new league, the Pacific Coast Hockey Association, to have the buildings built and operated by the team owners. The Vancouver Arena was built for $210,000 and was when it opened the world’s largest artificial ice surface in the world. This impressive building also seated an incredible ten thousand five hundred spectators, which the comprised ten percent of the entire urban population of Vancouver. The building was home to the PCHA’s Vancouver Millionaires as well as the Vancouver Maroons and the Vancouver Lions. However, its capacity was never close to being reached for the PCHA games and the league would last only a little over a decade before folding. The Western Canada Hockey League assumed two of the franchises from the now defunct PCHA, and the Vancouver Maroons continued to call the building home until its demise in 1926. A different WHL would surface in the mid-forties with a Vancouver club part of it.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Vancouver Arena

The Vancouver Arena.

CHIN

© Hockey Hall of Fame


The first Colisée in Quebec City opened in 1930. After a major fire, it was rebuilt during the summer and fall of 1949 at a new location a few hundred meters from the old site. Initially it hosted the Quebec City senior A league games and the Citadelles junior A provincial league games. In 1972, it became the official home of the Nordiques of the WHA (World Hockey Association). Seven years later, after the amalgamation of the NHL and the WHA, the Colisée expanded from a capacity of 10,000 to 15,000 seats. Since 1960, it has hosted all the games of the famous Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament.


The first Colisée in Quebec City opened in 1930. After a major fire, it was rebuilt during the summer and fall of 1949 at a new location a few hundred meters from the old site. Initially it hosted the Quebec City senior A league games and the Citadelles junior A provincial league games. In 1972, it became the official home of the Nordiques of the WHA (World Hockey Association). Seven years later, after the amalgamation of the NHL and the WHA, the Colisée expanded from a capacity of 10,000 to 15,000 seats. Since 1960, it has hosted all the games of the famous Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament.


© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Québec Colisée

Québec Colisée, 1950.

CHIN

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Investigate the role that hockey plays in Canada’s national identity
  • Explore the history of hockey in Canada
  • Investigate how the evolution of hockey equipment used by Canadian hockey players improved the quality and safety of the game.
  • Explore the evolution of the rules of hockey in Canada
  • Identify significant people involved in hockey in Canada
  • Identify historically significant arenas and rinks in Canada
  • Describe the involvement over time of Aboriginal peoples in hockey

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