Icebergs are very dramatic in their appearance, taking many shapes and varying greatly in size. The Greenland glaciers are the birthplace of most major icebergs in the Northern Hemisphere. They are created when the slow moving glacial ice reaches the sea and begins to break off into large masses. The movement of icebergs is caused by currents, winds and tides. As they move about, large pieces may break off forming smaller icebergs.
Icebergs are very dramatic in their appearance, taking many shapes and varying greatly in size. The Greenland glaciers are the birthplace of most major icebergs in the Northern Hemisphere. They are created when the slow moving glacial ice reaches the sea and begins to break off into large masses. The movement of icebergs is caused by currents, winds and tides. As they move about, large pieces may break off forming smaller icebergs.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Photo

Iceberg

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


Photo

Iceberg

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


For Inuit hunters, icebergs can be dangerous in the summer because they can break apart or shift position in the water without warning. In winter icebergs can be a welcome site if they are frozen into the solid ice. They are helpful to us as places to find freshwater, a place to find shelter from the wind, and as a place where we can rest. They are also used in the winter as meeting places or landmarks when traveling on wide expanses of flat sea ice.
For Inuit hunters, icebergs can be dangerous in the summer because they can break apart or shift position in the water without warning. In winter icebergs can be a welcome site if they are frozen into the solid ice. They are helpful to us as places to find freshwater, a place to find shelter from the wind, and as a place where we can rest. They are also used in the winter as meeting places or landmarks when traveling on wide expanses of flat sea ice.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Photo

Iceberg

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


Photo

Iceberg

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Describe icebergs and how they are formed
  • Explain how icebergs are both dangerous and helpful to the Inuit

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