As Canadian Inuit we look forward to, and are ready to meet the challenges of this new millennium. There are important problems to be solved and we realize that it will not be easy. It is our wish as Inuit to contribute to the well being of the earth, it’s living resources and all of the cultures that contribute to the rich diversity and strength of the human family.
As Canadian Inuit we look forward to, and are ready to meet the challenges of this new millennium. There are important problems to be solved and we realize that it will not be easy. It is our wish as Inuit to contribute to the well being of the earth, it’s living resources and all of the cultures that contribute to the rich diversity and strength of the human family.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

The late 1960s and early 1970s were a critical turning point in the course of our social, economic and political development. Young Inuit leaders who had a new political vision of the role of our people within Canada joined forces with the elders who maintained a vision of our culture, in calling for a process of change to reshape the basic relationship between Inuit and the rest of Canada.
The late 1960s and early 1970s were a critical turning point in the course of our social, economic and political development. Young Inuit leaders who had a new political vision of the role of our people within Canada joined forces with the elders who maintained a vision of our culture, in calling for a process of change to reshape the basic relationship between Inuit and the rest of Canada.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Meeting

Early meetings to determine our rights to the land were the first step towards self-government.

Courtesy of Inuit Tapirisat of Canada

© Inuit Tapirisat of Canada


meeting

We have reestablished our territory through the long process of land claims negotiations.

Courtesy of Inuit Tapirisat of Canada

© Inuit Tapirisat of Canada


The political mechanism for implementing a process of change was based on land claim negotiations between Inuit and government. Although land claims involve very complex historical and legal factors, the fundamental consideration was that as Inuit we never signed a formal treaty with any outside government giving up any part of our traditional territory.
The political mechanism for implementing a process of change was based on land claim negotiations between Inuit and government. Although land claims involve very complex historical and legal factors, the fundamental consideration was that as Inuit we never signed a formal treaty with any outside government giving up any part of our traditional territory.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Land Claim

The James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement was the first modern land claim.

Courtesy of Makivik Corporation.

© Makivik Corporation


meeting

Leaders of Makivik Corporation and the Kativik Regional Government meet in the Makivik boardroom in Quebec city.

Courtesy of Makivik Corporation.

© Makivik Corporation


Negotiations leading to comprehensive land claims agreements have taken many years to complete and new treaties have now been signed for all our regions except Labrador, which is now reaching its final stage of negotiations. Once the land claim process was completed, the engine of change has shifted to the development of self-government. The first stage of our political efforts culminated on April 1, 1999, when Nunavut was officially inaugurated as Canada’s newest territory.
Negotiations leading to comprehensive land claims agreements have taken many years to complete and new treaties have now been signed for all our regions except Labrador, which is now reaching its final stage of negotiations. Once the land claim process was completed, the engine of change has shifted to the development of self-government. The first stage of our political efforts culminated on April 1, 1999, when Nunavut was officially inaugurated as Canada’s newest territory.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Nunavut Flag

On April 1st, the Nunavut flag was raised over Canada's newest territory, Nunavut.

Courtesy of Inuit Tapirisat of Canada.

© Inuit Tapirisat of Canada


Celebrations

Nunavut celebrations.

Courtesy of Inuit Tapirisat of Canada

© Inuit Tapirisat of Canada


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Describe how the Inuit reshaped their relationship with the rest of Canada
  • Explain what a land claim is, and on what basis the Inuit claimed their territory
  • In simple terms, describe the status of Inuit land claim negotiations

Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans