Present day community life is much different. Essential values of our society have had to adapt to many new circumstances, some economic, some social and some in response to the new political structures found in each community. There are trucks, snowmobiles and an ever-increasing variety of small all-terrain vehicles driven by young and old alike. Since air travel and airfreight are essential, all communities have airstrips with up-to-date navigational aids. In addition we have modern stores to purchase imported foods and large freezers to preserve our own wildlife harvest. Most communities have a few roads and the skyline is interrupted by telephone poles, overhead wires, streetlights, and telecommunication equipment.

Our communities are governed by elected municipal governments with a mayor and council. Formal government is supported by committees established to oversee particular aspects of busy community life. Typically, there are committees for education, health, recreational and social services, and hunting, fishing and trapping. Churches continue to provide both spiritual leadership and support services designed to help parishioners cope with rapid cultural chang Read More
Present day community life is much different. Essential values of our society have had to adapt to many new circumstances, some economic, some social and some in response to the new political structures found in each community. There are trucks, snowmobiles and an ever-increasing variety of small all-terrain vehicles driven by young and old alike. Since air travel and airfreight are essential, all communities have airstrips with up-to-date navigational aids. In addition we have modern stores to purchase imported foods and large freezers to preserve our own wildlife harvest. Most communities have a few roads and the skyline is interrupted by telephone poles, overhead wires, streetlights, and telecommunication equipment.

Our communities are governed by elected municipal governments with a mayor and council. Formal government is supported by committees established to oversee particular aspects of busy community life. Typically, there are committees for education, health, recreational and social services, and hunting, fishing and trapping. Churches continue to provide both spiritual leadership and support services designed to help parishioners cope with rapid cultural change.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Village

A changing village landscape.

Photo by Eric Loring.

© Eric Loring


Inside the family home a different type of change can be observed. There are radios to receive community FM broadcasts, telephones, televisions showing programs produced by the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation and distributed over the Television Northern Canada (TVNC) network, VCRs, video games, computers and fax machines.

These are all being linked into the information super highway with the aid of communication satellites. Nevertheless, the elders still tell their stories, and children combine a commitment to formal education with a desire to learn as much as possible about the special qualities, values and traditions that give them a unique identity as Inuit.
Inside the family home a different type of change can be observed. There are radios to receive community FM broadcasts, telephones, televisions showing programs produced by the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation and distributed over the Television Northern Canada (TVNC) network, VCRs, video games, computers and fax machines.

These are all being linked into the information super highway with the aid of communication satellites. Nevertheless, the elders still tell their stories, and children combine a commitment to formal education with a desire to learn as much as possible about the special qualities, values and traditions that give them a unique identity as Inuit.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Livingroom

Pre-fabricated housing provides new options for family lifestyles.

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


The school systems being developed in our communities are carefully designing a curriculum that will enable today’s students to obtain a "modern" education as well as an appreciation for our unique culture and heritage. Language training in Inuktitut is essential. It is critical to place language within programs that use our own Inuit knowledge about the land and resources, to honour our history, values and customs and respect the importance of traditional skills. Inuit, therefore, have three types of educational opportunities. There is the formal school, our family and elders, and the land. Each has something essential to offer our children as they face the difficult but challenging tasks that lie ahead.
The school systems being developed in our communities are carefully designing a curriculum that will enable today’s students to obtain a "modern" education as well as an appreciation for our unique culture and heritage. Language training in Inuktitut is essential. It is critical to place language within programs that use our own Inuit knowledge about the land and resources, to honour our history, values and customs and respect the importance of traditional skills. Inuit, therefore, have three types of educational opportunities. There is the formal school, our family and elders, and the land. Each has something essential to offer our children as they face the difficult but challenging tasks that lie ahead.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Classroom

Northern education stresses learning in Inuktitut through the early grades.

Courtesy Inuit Tapirisat of Canada.

© Inuit Tapirisat of Canada


Within all the communities, particularly the larger regional centers, economic activity is becoming much more diversified. Yet an emphasis on new economic opportunities has not diminished the deeply entrenched desire of Inuit to maintain a hunting way of life. While a casual observer of community life may not encounter traditional activities, close ties to the land remain fundamental for all Inuit. The rhythm of the seasonal cycle is deeply imprinted on our culture. It provides a very special calendar of events that is unique to our society and homeland.
Within all the communities, particularly the larger regional centers, economic activity is becoming much more diversified. Yet an emphasis on new economic opportunities has not diminished the deeply entrenched desire of Inuit to maintain a hunting way of life. While a casual observer of community life may not encounter traditional activities, close ties to the land remain fundamental for all Inuit. The rhythm of the seasonal cycle is deeply imprinted on our culture. It provides a very special calendar of events that is unique to our society and homeland.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Children

Our children grow up learning two ways of life.

Photo by Eric Loring.

© Eric Loring


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Describe a modern day Inuit community
  • Describe a modern day Inuit family home
  • Describe the modern day Inuit school system, and economic system

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