People who have not visited our territory often think of the Arctic as simply being flat, snow covered for most of the year and without any trees or even vegetation. It is certainly true that most of our territory lies above the tree line and it is also true that there are vast expanses where you can see for miles. But even places that might seem flat and monotonous to an outsider are full of interesting things to see.
People who have not visited our territory often think of the Arctic as simply being flat, snow covered for most of the year and without any trees or even vegetation. It is certainly true that most of our territory lies above the tree line and it is also true that there are vast expanses where you can see for miles. But even places that might seem flat and monotonous to an outsider are full of interesting things to see.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

landscape

The winter landscape is sculpted into the snow.

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


Landscape

The deep green tundra of an Arctic summer.

Photo by Eric Loring.

© Eric Loring


One thing that the visitor to our territory should try to understand is that the diversity of the land is often created by many micro environments that are not only important ecologically but that also provide variety to the educated eye.
One thing that the visitor to our territory should try to understand is that the diversity of the land is often created by many micro environments that are not only important ecologically but that also provide variety to the educated eye.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

plants

Vegetation flourishes during the short Arctic summers.

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


Flowers

Nodding Lychnis

Photo by Scot Nickels.

© Scot Nickels


Parts of our Arctic territory are very mountainous and rugged. There are large lakes and fast flowing rivers. In some places these rivers run through very deep, wide valleys.
Parts of our Arctic territory are very mountainous and rugged. There are large lakes and fast flowing rivers. In some places these rivers run through very deep, wide valleys.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Trail Marker

Trail marker in weasel valley.

Courtesy of Parks Canada.

© Parks Canada


landscape

River in the Arctic

Photo by Grant Klassen.
Courtesy of Parks Canada.

© Parks Canada


Vegetation is abundant as ground cover but only along the southern margin and in parts of Labrador and the Mackenzie Delta can coniferous trees be found. In other places bushes and even small trees can be found, usually in the deep valleys or in places sheltered from the wind.
Vegetation is abundant as ground cover but only along the southern margin and in parts of Labrador and the Mackenzie Delta can coniferous trees be found. In other places bushes and even small trees can be found, usually in the deep valleys or in places sheltered from the wind.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Landscape

Small clusters of trees in protected valleys.

Courtesy of Parks Canada.

© 2000, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.


bones

The enduring cycle of life.

Photo by Eric Loring

© Eric Loring


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Describe aspects of the Arctic landscape, with examples
  • Describe the geography and vegetation of the Arctic
  • Explain why an outsider might miss some of the diversity of the Arctic landscape

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