Despite their busy daily lives, my grandparents, Willie and Eva, found time to instil in us the joy of music. My grandfather played the violin, my grandmother the piano. In all they had thirteen children who each inherited something of their parents´ musical talent. On Saturday evenings the family would gather in the living room of my grandparent’s small house, to play their beautiful Acadian music. As long as there were children in the family fold, the tradition went on.

Today, although my grandparents are dead, their music lives on. Their children all sing or play the guitar, the violin or the piano, and their grandchildren, several of whom are already adults, are beginning to show their talents as well as their interest in music. Several cousins, both male and female, sing and play the guitar, and the list of instruments played by the family has grown to include the flute, the clarinet, the oboe and the classical piano.

As one of the numerous grandchildren, I also play music. I have been playing the piano for over seven years now. My choice of instrument was heavily influenced by my family. Having heard my grandmother, my aunts and my uncles Read More
Despite their busy daily lives, my grandparents, Willie and Eva, found time to instil in us the joy of music. My grandfather played the violin, my grandmother the piano. In all they had thirteen children who each inherited something of their parents´ musical talent. On Saturday evenings the family would gather in the living room of my grandparent’s small house, to play their beautiful Acadian music. As long as there were children in the family fold, the tradition went on.

Today, although my grandparents are dead, their music lives on. Their children all sing or play the guitar, the violin or the piano, and their grandchildren, several of whom are already adults, are beginning to show their talents as well as their interest in music. Several cousins, both male and female, sing and play the guitar, and the list of instruments played by the family has grown to include the flute, the clarinet, the oboe and the classical piano.

As one of the numerous grandchildren, I also play music. I have been playing the piano for over seven years now. My choice of instrument was heavily influenced by my family. Having heard my grandmother, my aunts and my uncles play, I have always regarded the piano as a fascinating instrument. I was ten years old when I began my piano classes. Some time later I started listening to classical piano recordings. I quickly discovered the piano’s exceptional qualities. Its sound, sometimes clear and strong, sometimes warm and mellow, can express a multitude of different feelings.

Even though the piano is basically a product of the classical music tradition, Acadians have always found a way to preserve and promote the piano as an Acadian instrument through Acadian musical evenings.

The "old-time musical evenings" were always a must for Acadians. They were simply occasions when the inhabitants of a village got together to play Acadian music. The piano always played a part, though it was rarely played on its own. Most often it accompanied the violin, the accordion or the harmonica, also known as the mouth organ. Acadians had great fun at these gatherings.

I will always consider the piano to be of primary importance because it has defined me both as a young musician and as an Acadian. Numerous prominent Acadians share the same sentiment and are achieving success in preserving our beautiful heritage. I can hear them now... Angèle Arsenault, les Méchants Maquereaux, Suroît, Barachois...

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Piano

Musical instrument with keyboard and internal strings struck by hammers to produce sound. Made of walnut with two carved legs and three sound boxes, two of which are decorated with ornate motifs. The piano cover opens to reveal the keyboard and piano stool which bears the inscription "KNOTT A. Milton C.W. " The sounding board is equipped with two decorated metal pedals.

Musée acadien de l'Université de Moncton, Canada

© Musée acadien de l'Université de Moncton, Canada


My favourite instrument, the piano, belongs to the family of string instruments. I choose this instrument because I was a little bit familiar with it. My father was a "mosamea" (tenor) and he used to sing at home. My uncle was the leader of a folk music group and I used to listen to him while he was practising with other members of his band. I still go with another uncle to the shrine. So I was brought up in an environment that admires music. I started to sing with my siblings when I was under ten Second, this preference was based on an intellectual curiosity. When I was 13, my uncle helped me enrol at the Institute for Music as a singer in the amedah choir, a group from "La récitation des panégyriques". I stayed with the amedah for three years and I was a distinguished "munchid" singer. I used to sing mawawil (short, popular love songs, sung solo in a plaintive tone) taken from Andalusian poetry. Since mawawil are related to classical Arabic music, I was fond of them. I started to play the piano and perform classical Arabic music, Andalusian music and folk music. My practical experience in this field was better than my theoretical knowl Read More
My favourite instrument, the piano, belongs to the family of string instruments. I choose this instrument because I was a little bit familiar with it. My father was a "mosamea" (tenor) and he used to sing at home. My uncle was the leader of a folk music group and I used to listen to him while he was practising with other members of his band. I still go with another uncle to the shrine. So I was brought up in an environment that admires music. I started to sing with my siblings when I was under ten Second, this preference was based on an intellectual curiosity. When I was 13, my uncle helped me enrol at the Institute for Music as a singer in the amedah choir, a group from "La récitation des panégyriques". I stayed with the amedah for three years and I was a distinguished "munchid" singer. I used to sing mawawil (short, popular love songs, sung solo in a plaintive tone) taken from Andalusian poetry. Since mawawil are related to classical Arabic music, I was fond of them. I started to play the piano and perform classical Arabic music, Andalusian music and folk music. My practical experience in this field was better than my theoretical knowledge.

I do not know the development and evolution of this instrument and its initial form. My knowledge of this instrument was purely artistique. But my interest in drawing, which I learned in primary and intermediate education, enabled me to draw the piano.

I was free to sing in my family environment. A benefactor bought me a piano as a gift to encourage me to enhance my knowledge of this instrument. I used to spend one hour a day playing the piano to break the monotony of the school that I felt when I came Back from school in the evening. By combining my hobby and studies, I was able to feel a certain balance and peace of mind.

I can say that the piano is used both in classical music and Andalusian music. As for the geographic distribution and cultural influence, the piano is used in most Moroccan music institutes and it is a musical instrument mainly used and admired by the intelligentsia and the rich from the aristocracy

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Piano2

Piano

Andalusian Study and Research Centre
c. 1710
Basswood covered in ivory or ebony for the black keys
Length: 1.58m, Width: 47.5cm, Height: 1.28m
© Andalusian Study and Research Centre


There does not seem to be much difference between a normal teaching piano and that of a professional artist except that, in the latter, the piano case has a glossy varnished finish, the keyboard has ivory keys, and it is always in tune.

The piano is very different from other stringed instruments whether it is a classical or electric type. The piano is the most recently developed hammer-action string instrument. Its origins go Back to the harpsichord and other plucked string instruments. There were no hammer-action stringed instruments before the Middle Ages.

Bartolomeo Critofori of Padua invented the piano in 1709-1710 calling it the "gravicimbalo col piano e forte" (harpsichord with soft and loud). These instruments used a mechanism that is more closely related to our current piano than to the harpsichord. Generally speaking, the age of the piano did not start until around 1765-1770 when Joseph Haydn wrote his first sonatas for the instrument. John Broadwood began to make pianos in London in 1773 and considerably improved the Cristofori- Silbermann mechanism.

From 1796 to 1823, Sebastian Erard of France developed the escapement and do Read More

There does not seem to be much difference between a normal teaching piano and that of a professional artist except that, in the latter, the piano case has a glossy varnished finish, the keyboard has ivory keys, and it is always in tune.

The piano is very different from other stringed instruments whether it is a classical or electric type. The piano is the most recently developed hammer-action string instrument. Its origins go Back to the harpsichord and other plucked string instruments. There were no hammer-action stringed instruments before the Middle Ages.

Bartolomeo Critofori of Padua invented the piano in 1709-1710 calling it the "gravicimbalo col piano e forte" (harpsichord with soft and loud). These instruments used a mechanism that is more closely related to our current piano than to the harpsichord. Generally speaking, the age of the piano did not start until around 1765-1770 when Joseph Haydn wrote his first sonatas for the instrument. John Broadwood began to make pianos in London in 1773 and considerably improved the Cristofori- Silbermann mechanism.

From 1796 to 1823, Sebastian Erard of France developed the escapement and double escapement mechanisms and this is the principle on which modern pianos are still built. Some improvements to detail were introduced in the early 19th century with the invention of the upright piano (in England in 1807), the metal case (in the US in 1825) and the principle of cross-stringing or overstrung pianos (in the US in 1832).

The piano is basically made up of a soundboard in thin spruce or pine, mounted on a frame called the belly. The strings are stretched on a bridge placed on the soundboard. The strings are attached at both ends to a pin block, hitch pins at the far end and wrest pins at the keyboard end. Trichord stringing except for the base notes, put some 20 tonnes of pressure on the frame. The keys are made of basswood covered with ivory or ebony (for the black keys) and each operates a hammer and a damper simultaneously. The two pedals, soft and loud, are used to play piano and forte passages.

The pianist must sit facing the piano keys. Only piano or guitar virtuosi can play without looking at the keyboard or fingerboard. The piano is a solo orchestral instrument and it can be heard in all kinds of music in Morocco. It is especially used for classical and Andalusian music but not for traditional popular, modern or variety music.


© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Piano3

Piano Circa 1710 Basswood covered in ivory or ebony for the black keys Upper length: 1.58 m / width: 47.5 cm Lower length: 1.47 m / width: 28.5 cm Upper height: 1.28 m / width of the lower: 42.5 cm Lower height (to the keyboard): 73 cm Andalusian Study and Research Centre

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Canadian Heritage Information Network, Centre des recherches et études andalouses, Centre des musiques arabes et méditerranéennes Ennejma Ezzahra, Musée de la musique, Laboratoire de recherche des musiques du monde, Musée acadien de l'Université de Moncton, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Musée d'art et d'archéologie de l'Université d'Antananarivo, Musée ethnographique Alexandre Sènou Adande, Musée national du Mali, St. Boniface Museum, Lycée de langues étrangères Alexandre Dumas, Museum of the Romanian Peasant

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.


Piano Moncton: Audio

Piano Moncton: Audio

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Canadian Heritage Information Network, Centre des recherches et études andalouses, Centre des musiques arabes et méditerranéennes Ennejma Ezzahra, Musée de la musique, Laboratoire de recherche des musiques du monde, Musée acadien de l'Université de Moncton, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Musée d'art et d'archéologie de l'Université d'Antananarivo, Musée ethnographique Alexandre Sènou Adande, Musée national du Mali, St. Boniface Museum, Lycée de langues étrangères Alexandre Dumas, Museum of the Romanian Peasant

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.


Piano Marocco: Audio

Piano Marocco: Audio

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Canadian Heritage Information Network, Centre des recherches et études andalouses, Centre des musiques arabes et méditerranéennes Ennejma Ezzahra, Musée de la musique, Laboratoire de recherche des musiques du monde, Musée acadien de l'Université de Moncton, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Musée d'art et d'archéologie de l'Université d'Antananarivo, Musée ethnographique Alexandre Sènou Adande, Musée national du Mali, St. Boniface Museum, Lycée de langues étrangères Alexandre Dumas, Museum of the Romanian Peasant

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that music is an expression in all cultures
  • Understand that the relationship between personal feelings and music transcends borders and cultures
  • Develop respect for music from a variety of cultural contexts
  • Examine traditional music practices in selected Francophone countries
  • Demonstrate geographical awareness by identifying Francophone countries
  • Be aware of the musical contributions of various cultural groups in their own community
  • Understand that all world music can be organized within a standard classification system

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