Children

The group from the "Institution Sainte Jeanne d'Arc", Dakar, in their workshop making a glass picture

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


For some years now, fountain, felt-tip and ballpoint pens have replaced the pen-holders of our school days. Using a straight-pen requires a certain level of manual dexterity. In our workshops:
pupils are taught how to mix colours and learn about elementary colour concepts (primary and secondary colours); in order to achieve the right result, the technique must be carried out carefully; children who cannot draw very well or who do not have much imagination can transfer whatever drawing they choose onto the glass.
For some years now, fountain, felt-tip and ballpoint pens have replaced the pen-holders of our school days. Using a straight-pen requires a certain level of manual dexterity. In our workshops:
  • pupils are taught how to mix colours and learn about elementary colour concepts (primary and secondary colours);
  • in order to achieve the right result, the technique must be carried out carefully;
  • children who cannot draw very well or who do not have much imagination can transfer whatever drawing they choose onto the glass.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Note: Indelible India ink and oil paints are not as suitable for younger children. For this age group, water-based paints, if they are available, are easier to apply.

Materials

For the picture, you will need:

a piece of glass 18 x 14 cm and 2 to 3 mm thick (the dimensions can vary depending on the skill of the children but larger pieces are more difficult to handle, frame and hang) pen and pen-holder black India ink various sized brushes oil or other paint that has good coverage paint solvent rags razor blade (adults only)
For the frame, you will need:

cardboard (can be recycled) cotton string roll of adhesive tape, minimum 2 cm wide craft knife (adults only)
Tips:

Oil paints should be used only in a well-ventilated location. Read More
Note: Indelible India ink and oil paints are not as suitable for younger children. For this age group, water-based paints, if they are available, are easier to apply.

Materials

For the picture, you will need:

  • a piece of glass 18 x 14 cm and 2 to 3 mm thick (the dimensions can vary depending on the skill of the children but larger pieces are more difficult to handle, frame and hang)
  • pen and pen-holder
  • black India ink
  • various sized brushes
  • oil or other paint that has good coverage
  • paint solvent
  • rags
  • razor blade (adults only)

For the frame, you will need:

  • cardboard (can be recycled)
  • cotton string
  • roll of adhesive tape, minimum 2 cm wide
  • craft knife (adults only)

Tips:

  • Oil paints should be used only in a well-ventilated location.
  • Mixing and thinning paint should be done preferably by adults so that children do not have to breathe the fumes.
  • Only adults should use craft knives or razor blades.
  • Several sessions are needed to complete a picture because the ink and various coats of paint must be left to dry (a hair dryer may be used to speed up drying time).
  • Children can draw their own pictures or transfer existing drawings.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Glass Painting

Making a drawing to transfer to glass

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Draw, trace or transfer the drawing on the glass with India ink. Beginners should not make their drawings too small or have too many small surfaces to fill in. Anything that is to appear black in the final picture should be done at this stage. India ink cannot be erased so wait until it dries and then have an adult scrape off any mistakes or spots with a razor blade.
Draw, trace or transfer the drawing on the glass with India ink. Beginners should not make their drawings too small or have too many small surfaces to fill in. Anything that is to appear black in the final picture should be done at this stage. India ink cannot be erased so wait until it dries and then have an adult scrape off any mistakes or spots with a razor blade.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Glass Painting

If you do not make an original drawing, you can transfer one using India ink.

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Glass Painting

The signature should be written from right to left, in "mirror writing".

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


First, paint the details or whatever will appear on the surface of the glass. This is because the final work will be seen through the glass (e.g., eyes, mouth, fruit on a tree, etc...). Let the paint dry between coats so the colours do not bleed into one another.

Ask an adult to use a razor blade to scrape away excess paint once it has dried.

Continue until you get to the final coat (the background of the picture) which will cover the glass entirely.
First, paint the details or whatever will appear on the surface of the glass. This is because the final work will be seen through the glass (e.g., eyes, mouth, fruit on a tree, etc...). Let the paint dry between coats so the colours do not bleed into one another.

Ask an adult to use a razor blade to scrape away excess paint once it has dried.

Continue until you get to the final coat (the background of the picture) which will cover the glass entirely.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Glass Painting

Painting details on the glass

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Glass Painting

Before applying the background, working on the wrong side.

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Glass Painting

Before applying the background, right side.

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Glass Painting

Applying the background

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Step 1 Cut the cardboard to the same size as the glass.

Step 2 A quarter of the way from the top of the cardboard and in the centre width-wise, make two holes. A length of cotton string will be passed through the holes to form a hanger.

Step 3 If the string is thin, double it and make a sturdy braid.

Step 4 Have an adult cut two strips of adhesive tape the exact length, and two the exact width, of the frame. Attach them between the cardboard and the glass with .5 cm on the glass and the rest on the cardboard.

Step 5 Have an adult cut two strips of adhesive tape the exact length, and two the exact width, of the frame. Attach them between the cardboard and the glass with .5 cm on the glass and the rest on the cardboard.
Step 1 Cut the cardboard to the same size as the glass.

Step 2 A quarter of the way from the top of the cardboard and in the centre width-wise, make two holes. A length of cotton string will be passed through the holes to form a hanger.

Step 3 If the string is thin, double it and make a sturdy braid.

Step 4 Have an adult cut two strips of adhesive tape the exact length, and two the exact width, of the frame. Attach them between the cardboard and the glass with .5 cm on the glass and the rest on the cardboard.

Step 5 Have an adult cut two strips of adhesive tape the exact length, and two the exact width, of the frame. Attach them between the cardboard and the glass with .5 cm on the glass and the rest on the cardboard.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Frame

The steps in making a frame [label steps 1-5 to match steps above. Step one top left, step two top middle, step 3 bottom left, step 4 bottom middle, step 5 far right.

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Glass Painting

The glass picture is ready to be hung.

Musée de la Femme "Henriette Bathily"
Canadian Heritage Information Network

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • describe the techniques of glass painting;
  • practise creative skills, manual dexterity, and following instructions;
  • make connections between own culture and the culture of Senegal.

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