The second North American Indigenous Games were held in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, July 18-25, 1993 The 1993 Games continued the legacy of sporting excellence and personal development started in 1990 for all Indigenous participants The focus was on youth to experience the rich history and cultural traditions so they can stand strong, brave and true They attracted approximately 4,400 sport participants and several hundred cultural performers from Indigenous communities across Canada and the United States

The second North American Indigenous Games were held in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, July 18-25, 1993

  • The 1993 Games continued the legacy of sporting excellence and personal development started in 1990 for all Indigenous participants
  • The focus was on youth to experience the rich history and cultural traditions so they can stand strong, brave and true
  • They attracted approximately 4,400 sport participants and several hundred cultural performers from Indigenous communities across Canada and the United States

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Opening Ceremonies

The second North American Indigenous Games were held in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, July 18-25, 1993

Rick Brant 1993

Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, CANADA
© Rick Brant 1993


Eugene Arcand

Eugene Arcand, Chairperson, 1993 NAIG

Will the vision continue?

"The North American Indigenous Games have become an event that brings together First Nations and Aboriginal people from the four directions to a gathering place where we all agree we’ll showcase our talents in all areas that involve sports, recreation and culture." (Eugene Arcand)

1993 North American Indigenous Games Host Society tape, "T.S.N Report#2"
Video: North American Indigenous Games Council, 1993 NAIG Host Society, TSN 1993

© TSN 1993


Altogether, an estimated 25,000 participants and spectators attended

The sports contested were Archery, Badminton, Baseball, Basketball, Boxing, Canoeing, Fastball, Golf, Field Lacrosse, Rifle Shooting, Soccer, Swimming, Track & Field, Volleyball, Wrestling

Overall team champion: Saskatchewan, for the 2nd time

Many cultural activities included both young and old: "Culture is our heritage; it’s part of our being." "We always include our cultural ways . . . to enhance the pride of one and all." (Eugene Arcand). Events presented in the Cultural Village were: Traditional Dances: Fancy, Square, Jingle Dress and others All Nations traditional Pow wows and food fairs Fashion show Elders circle Traditional sports Talent show Craft fair Rodeo

Altogether, an estimated 25,000 participants and spectators attended

The sports contested were Archery, Badminton, Baseball, Basketball, Boxing, Canoeing, Fastball, Golf, Field Lacrosse, Rifle Shooting, Soccer, Swimming, Track & Field, Volleyball, Wrestling

Overall team champion: Saskatchewan, for the 2nd time

Many cultural activities included both young and old: "Culture is our heritage; it’s part of our being." "We always include our cultural ways . . . to enhance the pride of one and all." (Eugene Arcand). Events presented in the Cultural Village were:

  • Traditional Dances: Fancy, Square, Jingle Dress and others
  • All Nations traditional Pow wows and food fairs
  • Fashion show
  • Elders circle
  • Traditional sports
  • Talent show
  • Craft fair
  • Rodeo

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Competing, participating, sharing, celebrating ...

Some of the cultural and sporting events

1993 North American Indigenous Games Host Society tape, "T.S.N Report#2"
Video: North American Indigenous Games Council, 1993 NAIG Host Society, TSN 1993

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.


From a coach: "Hopefully this will carry on for generations to come. It’s the greatest experience. . . It’s a way for the youth to start setting goals for themselves." (Darren Stevenson, Badminton coach)

From an athlete: "I’ll show them [First Nation youth] my medal, tell them what I did, that it’s good, that it’s worth it, that it’s a good thing to work for . . ."
(Rupert Lopez, wrestler)

From a volunteer:". . . We must ensure that we encourage our young people to learn the teachings that were handed down through the old people. Emotional, mental, physical and spiritual well-being are the four components to holistic development, and the North American Indigenous Games provide all of those."
From a coach: "Hopefully this will carry on for generations to come. It’s the greatest experience. . . It’s a way for the youth to start setting goals for themselves." (Darren Stevenson, Badminton coach)

From an athlete: "I’ll show them [First Nation youth] my medal, tell them what I did, that it’s good, that it’s worth it, that it’s a good thing to work for . . ."
(Rupert Lopez, wrestler)

From a volunteer:". . . We must ensure that we encourage our young people to learn the teachings that were handed down through the old people. Emotional, mental, physical and spiritual well-being are the four components to holistic development, and the North American Indigenous Games provide all of those."
(Lorna Arcand, Host Community Coordinator and Athlete Services)

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

From a volunteer

". . . We must ensure that we encourage our young people to learn the teachings that were handed down through the old people. Emotional, mental, physical and spiritual well-being are the four components to holistic development, and the North American Indigenous Games provide all of those."

Lorna Arcand, Host Community Coordinator and Athlete Services

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.


Closing ceremonies

Closing ceremonies

North American Indigenous Games Council
Photo: North American Indigenous Games Council, 1993 North American Indigenous Games Host Society, TSN 1993

© TSN 1993


"The 1993 North American Indigenous Games were a great triumph. The Spirit Strong, Brave and True . . . an affirmation of what lies at the core of the Native heart. Understand these words, and you’ll understand the Indigenous people of North America. Understand also that these Games represent only a stepping-stone, a beginning. What was learned and experienced in Prince Albert is to be treasured and built upon."
"The 1993 North American Indigenous Games were a great triumph. The Spirit Strong, Brave and True . . . an affirmation of what lies at the core of the Native heart. Understand these words, and you’ll understand the Indigenous people of North America. Understand also that these Games represent only a stepping-stone, a beginning. What was learned and experienced in Prince Albert is to be treasured and built upon."

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Describe the activities and events that take place at the North American Indigenous Games (NAIG)
  • Recognize the contributions of individuals to the NAIG
  • Understand the benefits of the NAIG to Aboriginal society

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