Immigration from one country to another has been a common occurrence throughout time. Historians, sociologists, and journalists have tended to focus their attention on those who chose to leave their nations behind for a new country. But immigration also has had far-reaching effects on those left behind.

Here you will find the personal accounts of three people who did not leave Germany, but who were affected in different ways by the powerful force of migration. A need to alter the communication and connectivity of the family unit, coupled with a sense of loss are some of the characteristic responses to immigration.

An additional story is included, in which the sister who emigrated provides her account of how the family reacted to such a monumental change.

Immigration from one country to another has been a common occurrence throughout time. Historians, sociologists, and journalists have tended to focus their attention on those who chose to leave their nations behind for a new country. But immigration also has had far-reaching effects on those left behind.

Here you will find the personal accounts of three people who did not leave Germany, but who were affected in different ways by the powerful force of migration. A need to alter the communication and connectivity of the family unit, coupled with a sense of loss are some of the characteristic responses to immigration.

An additional story is included, in which the sister who emigrated provides her account of how the family reacted to such a monumental change.


© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Celle, the town of dukes and kings, lies 50 kilometres north of Hannover, which is the capital of Lower Saxony. Our three interview partners either come from the area around Celle, or they still live there today. Ute Konhert and her sister Jutta were born there. Jutta and Detlef Kober emigrated from Celle to Canada.

Emigrants coming to Canada all shared one feeling - that of freedom - freedom from conventions and traditions and freedom, inspired by the wide country.

Seeing these images of the beautiful Renaissance city of Celle, one will better understand that feeling, because traditions still shape life in the region today.

It is no surprise then, that the emigrants adapted quickly to the new environment.
Celle, the town of dukes and kings, lies 50 kilometres north of Hannover, which is the capital of Lower Saxony. Our three interview partners either come from the area around Celle, or they still live there today. Ute Konhert and her sister Jutta were born there. Jutta and Detlef Kober emigrated from Celle to Canada.

Emigrants coming to Canada all shared one feeling - that of freedom - freedom from conventions and traditions and freedom, inspired by the wide country.

Seeing these images of the beautiful Renaissance city of Celle, one will better understand that feeling, because traditions still shape life in the region today.

It is no surprise then, that the emigrants adapted quickly to the new environment.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

City Hall

The old city hall of Celle at night. Its beautiful Renaissance facade was built in the Weser-Renaissance style and has been preserved in the original style.

Photographer: Karl Sarnow

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Main Street

Zoellnerstraße is the main street of Celle. In the background one can see the castle and the tower of the city church.

Photographer: Karl Sarnow

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All rights reserved.


Castle

The Renaissance castle of the dukes of Braunschweig-Lüneburg is in the centre of the historic core of the city of Celle. The castle is home to a beautiful small Renaissance theatre.

Photographer: Karl Sarnow

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All rights reserved.


Statue

The monument of the kneeling soldier in front of the castle is a reminder of the fallen soldiers of two world wars. His message: No more wars.

Photographer: Karl Sarnow

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Reflect on the effects of immigration on the families left behind
  • Recognize that immigrants bring with them traditions, heritage, and experiences from their homeland

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