A short Account of the Colony and the present state of it

"that the Climate is as healthy, and the Soil as Rich and fertile as any other of the British colonies, affording, when cultivated, all the Comforts and Conveniences of Life. That the Seacoast abounds with Fish in greater plenty and variety than any other part of America and is peculiarly adapted to Commerce and Navigation. . . That the Inland Parts are very proper for the cultivation and Produce of Grain, Hemp, Flax and all other Commodities that are to be found or produced in other parts of America, and which are now produced in all such parts of this Province as have been hitherto cultivated. That a number of British Subjects were this year sent from England to settle... That the said Settlers have had constant Supplies of fresh provisions from the French Inhabitants of the said province who remained there after the Treaty of Utrecht ... and whose Farms produce Corn and Cattle in great Abundance...."
A short Account of the Colony and the present state of it

"that the Climate is as healthy, and the Soil as Rich and fertile as any other of the British colonies, affording, when cultivated, all the Comforts and Conveniences of Life. That the Seacoast abounds with Fish in greater plenty and variety than any other part of America and is peculiarly adapted to Commerce and Navigation. . . That the Inland Parts are very proper for the cultivation and Produce of Grain, Hemp, Flax and all other Commodities that are to be found or produced in other parts of America, and which are now produced in all such parts of this Province as have been hitherto cultivated. That a number of British Subjects were this year sent from England to settle... That the said Settlers have had constant Supplies of fresh provisions from the French Inhabitants of the said province who remained there after the Treaty of Utrecht ... and whose Farms produce Corn and Cattle in great Abundance...."

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Handbill

A German handbill circulated by John Dick to recruit settlers

Institution: Public Archives of Nova Scotia
c. 1750
© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


From its humble beginnings, Lunenburg grew and prospered. In the 19th century, sailing ships built there were world-famous for their sturdiness and speed. It had a large fishing fleet and fish-processing plants. At one time, Lunenburg claimed more millionaires per capita than any other town in North America. The beauty and the historical importance of the old part of the town contributed to it becoming a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995.
From its humble beginnings, Lunenburg grew and prospered. In the 19th century, sailing ships built there were world-famous for their sturdiness and speed. It had a large fishing fleet and fish-processing plants. At one time, Lunenburg claimed more millionaires per capita than any other town in North America. The beauty and the historical importance of the old part of the town contributed to it becoming a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Lunenburg

View of Lunenburg from Kaulback's Head, c. 1901. In the foreground are fish flakes for drying cod in the sun.

Photographer: Unknown
c. 1901
© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


The decline of the fishing stocks have imposed new hardships on Lunenburg, but tourism is thriving. As always, Lunenburgers meet adversity with the resiliency and resourcefulness shown by the first settlers.
The decline of the fishing stocks have imposed new hardships on Lunenburg, but tourism is thriving. As always, Lunenburgers meet adversity with the resiliency and resourcefulness shown by the first settlers.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

View from Wharf, Lunenburg

Still an important fishing town, Lunenburg is also developing its tourism.

Photographer: Heather Holm
c. 1998
© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


St. John's Church, Lunenburg

St. John's Anglican Church in Lunenburg today has expanded far beyond its original size. Inset: the church in 1754. At first, three different denominations used the church.

Photographer: Heather Holm
c. 1998
© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Lunenburgers continued to speak their own German dialect until the 20th century, and remnants of it can still be heard in the local accent and expressions.

Many of the German settlers of the 1750s stayed in Halifax and contributed greatly to the city’s development. The "Little Dutch Church" built in the 1750’s still stands in their memory.
Lunenburgers continued to speak their own German dialect until the 20th century, and remnants of it can still be heard in the local accent and expressions.

Many of the German settlers of the 1750s stayed in Halifax and contributed greatly to the city’s development. The "Little Dutch Church" built in the 1750’s still stands in their memory.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

The "Little Dutch Church"

Halifax's "Little Dutch Church," built 1754-55. Some of the gravestones mark the passing of original German settlers.

Artist: Heather Holm
c. 1998
© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Connect traditions and culture of modern day Lunenburg, Nova Scotia with the German origins of its people
  • Understand how German emigrants were enticed to come to Nova Scotia

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