By 1700, Rotterdam was the second largest merchant city in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam. Rotterdam was originally a fishing village created on land claimed by draining the mouth of the Rotte River in the 13th century. Canal-building allowed it to become a major port. Dutch commerce and shipping increased greatly in the 17th century, with the development of trade to the East Indies. At this time, Rotterdam expanded its harbours.

Napoleon’s occupation, from 1795 to 1815, put a stop to most trade. But Rotterdam adapted to the demands of large ocean-going steamships and increased passenger traffic by building new waterways yet again. Its economy remains almost entirely based on shipping
By 1700, Rotterdam was the second largest merchant city in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam. Rotterdam was originally a fishing village created on land claimed by draining the mouth of the Rotte River in the 13th century. Canal-building allowed it to become a major port. Dutch commerce and shipping increased greatly in the 17th century, with the development of trade to the East Indies. At this time, Rotterdam expanded its harbours.

Napoleon’s occupation, from 1795 to 1815, put a stop to most trade. But Rotterdam adapted to the demands of large ocean-going steamships and increased passenger traffic by building new waterways yet again. Its economy remains almost entirely based on shipping

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

From the river, in 1752, an emigrant family must have seen the crane that stood over the famous Gothic cathedral, which had been under construction for 500 years. The cathedral contains relics of the Three Magi, making the city an important place of pilgrimage.

Cologne is one of the most important cities in German history, and one of the oldest. The Romans declared it a city in 50 A.D., a hundred years after Caesar had conquered Gaul to the banks of the Rhine. They called it Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium. The "permanent" bridge they built over the Rhine in 310 was gone long before Jakob’s family passed through.

The citizens of Cologne took power from the archbishops in 1288 and governed the city themselves until the French occupied the city in 1794. During this period it became an important and wealthy trading city of the Hanseatic League.

"Eau de Cologne" was first produced in 1709.
From the river, in 1752, an emigrant family must have seen the crane that stood over the famous Gothic cathedral, which had been under construction for 500 years. The cathedral contains relics of the Three Magi, making the city an important place of pilgrimage.

Cologne is one of the most important cities in German history, and one of the oldest. The Romans declared it a city in 50 A.D., a hundred years after Caesar had conquered Gaul to the banks of the Rhine. They called it Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium. The "permanent" bridge they built over the Rhine in 310 was gone long before Jakob’s family passed through.

The citizens of Cologne took power from the archbishops in 1288 and governed the city themselves until the French occupied the city in 1794. During this period it became an important and wealthy trading city of the Hanseatic League.

"Eau de Cologne" was first produced in 1709.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Painting

Cologne, 1830. A crane is used to load boats. In the distance can be seen another crane - used to build the Cathedral.

Artist: Teetzmann
Vues des endroits. Dresden: Verlag C.A. Beger 1830. Taken from: Die illustrierten Rhein-Beschreibungen von Michael Schmitt; Köln: Weimar; Wien: Böhlau; 1996.
c. 1830
© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


In 1750, Prince Clemens August (1723-1761) was building distinguished palaces and gardens in Bonn which can still be admired today. Bonn had become a royal seat of power in 1597. In the mid 18th century, spared of epidemics and wars, it was a comfortable baroque city.

The 1751 population of 10,135 had more than doubled in 150 years. The court was the most important employer. Business profited from the needs of the aristocracy and the city was the distribution centre for agricultural products from the surrounding countryside. Traders, especially brewers and butchers, were wealthy, but there was also poverty in the streets of Bonn
In 1750, Prince Clemens August (1723-1761) was building distinguished palaces and gardens in Bonn which can still be admired today. Bonn had become a royal seat of power in 1597. In the mid 18th century, spared of epidemics and wars, it was a comfortable baroque city.

The 1751 population of 10,135 had more than doubled in 150 years. The court was the most important employer. Business profited from the needs of the aristocracy and the city was the distribution centre for agricultural products from the surrounding countryside. Traders, especially brewers and butchers, were wealthy, but there was also poverty in the streets of Bonn

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Bonn

The tollhouse and ferry at Bonn. Abraham Storck 1674.

Artist: Abraham Storck
Geschichte der Stadt Bonn, Band 3: Bonn als kurlölnische Haupt- und Residenzstadt 1574-1794, Norbert Schloßmacher, ed
c. 1674
© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


The view of Drachenfels, with its ruined castle, is very dramatic from the river. It’s one of the Seven Hills near Bonn. Here’s one of its many legends:

Long ago, the people who lived on the left side of the Rhine were Christians, while those on the right were heathens. One day the heathens captured the Christian king’s daughter. A heathen prince fell in love with her, but the young girl didn’t want a man who didn’t believe in God.

A dragon lived in a cave underneath the castle. The heathens decided to sacrifice the princess to the dangerous dragon to calm him down. In the early morning she was fastened to a rock in front of the cave. The prince wanted to help her but he didn´t dare. But the girl had no fear. She trusted in God and was convinced that He would help her. She took her crucifix and looked at it intently. Suddenly the dragon came out of the cave looking for his victim. When he saw the young girl he ran towards her. But then he saw the crucifix and got a paralyzing shock. Dazed, he rolled down the rock and fell into the foaming river, where he died. The heathens admired her and fell on their knees. She had prie Read More
The view of Drachenfels, with its ruined castle, is very dramatic from the river. It’s one of the Seven Hills near Bonn. Here’s one of its many legends:

Long ago, the people who lived on the left side of the Rhine were Christians, while those on the right were heathens. One day the heathens captured the Christian king’s daughter. A heathen prince fell in love with her, but the young girl didn’t want a man who didn’t believe in God.

A dragon lived in a cave underneath the castle. The heathens decided to sacrifice the princess to the dangerous dragon to calm him down. In the early morning she was fastened to a rock in front of the cave. The prince wanted to help her but he didn´t dare. But the girl had no fear. She trusted in God and was convinced that He would help her. She took her crucifix and looked at it intently. Suddenly the dragon came out of the cave looking for his victim. When he saw the young girl he ran towards her. But then he saw the crucifix and got a paralyzing shock. Dazed, he rolled down the rock and fell into the foaming river, where he died. The heathens admired her and fell on their knees. She had priests from her home town come and christen them. When the prince was baptized the two of them married.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Rhine

Boats passing the Seven Hills south of Bonn in the 1760s.

Artist: H. de Leth
Source : Leth, Hendrik de (Ill.) et Grebe, Fredrik Willem (Hrsg.) : Deeze Gezichten langs den Rhyn naar het Leven getekend, en in't koper gebracht ao 1763 & 1764 ... Amsterdam: Grebe, 1767. Tiré de : Der Lauf des Rheines; W. Schäfke und Ingrid Bodsch, eds., Kölnisches Stadtmuseum, Köln 1993.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Because of poor economic conditions in the 18th century, more and more farmers were leaving the region to look for a better life in another country. The Elector of Koblenz banned emigration in 1724 and renewed the ban in 1763 with higher punishments, including confiscation of property.

The 2000 year old city of Koblenz has always been a transportation centre, due to its position where the Mosel meets the Rhine. Nowadays, not only ships but trains and busses travel along the Rhine and the Mosel to and from this city of 120,000.
Because of poor economic conditions in the 18th century, more and more farmers were leaving the region to look for a better life in another country. The Elector of Koblenz banned emigration in 1724 and renewed the ban in 1763 with higher punishments, including confiscation of property.

The 2000 year old city of Koblenz has always been a transportation centre, due to its position where the Mosel meets the Rhine. Nowadays, not only ships but trains and busses travel along the Rhine and the Mosel to and from this city of 120,000.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Koblenz

The bridge across the Mosel at Koblenz, 1833

Artist: Leitch Ritchie
Alexander Von Humboldt Schule, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Carl-Friedrich Gauß Schule, Confederation High School, Deutsachherren-Gymnasium, German Historical Museum, Gymnasium Isernhagen, Horton High School/Acadia University, Integrierte Gesamtschule Bonne-Beuel, Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) and Deutsche Telekom, Ananas Productions, Schule ans netz,

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


In the 1750s, Frankfurt’s position on the River Main was an outstanding location for business. People would come from all over Europe to sell their goods at the Harvest Fair. Mostly freshly harvested goods but also books could be found for sale in the side streets and marketplace.

The city’s population was growing because of trade, and also for the religious freedom Frankfurt had offered for 200 years.

Kings and Emperors were crowned in St. Bartholomew’s, one of the most famous churches in the Holy Roman Empire.

Still, there was unrest in Frankfurt. Protests against the power of City Council sometimes resulted in serious revolts, which were violently repressed.
In the 1750s, Frankfurt’s position on the River Main was an outstanding location for business. People would come from all over Europe to sell their goods at the Harvest Fair. Mostly freshly harvested goods but also books could be found for sale in the side streets and marketplace.

The city’s population was growing because of trade, and also for the religious freedom Frankfurt had offered for 200 years.

Kings and Emperors were crowned in St. Bartholomew’s, one of the most famous churches in the Holy Roman Empire.

Still, there was unrest in Frankfurt. Protests against the power of City Council sometimes resulted in serious revolts, which were violently repressed.

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Church

St. Bartholomew's Church, Frankfurt

Photographer: Heather Holm

© 2009, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Identify some cities on the Rhine
  • Recognize some of the cultural attributes of these cities
  • Relate the history of several cities on the Rhine
  • Relate the geography of cities on the Rhine to cultural attributes

Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans