Born in Moscow in 1866. Died in Neuilly-sur-Seine in 1944. Kandinsky was the son of a prominent Siberian merchant. From an early age, he was fluent in Russian and German, and studied law at Moscow University. Having completed the course, he unexpectedly refused a position at Derpt (Dorpat/Tartu) University, and left for Germany to study painting. Two artistic impressions prompted Kandinsky to make this decision: the first was a visit to a peasant’s hut in the Volgograd province where he felt as if he had “entered” a painting, and the second—Monet’s painting, Haystack when he saw that it was “non-objective.” In 1896, Kandinsky went to study in Munich at Aschbe’s school (1897–1898), and then at the Academy of Arts (1900). The Munich period of Kandinsky’s creative work, which lasted up to 1914, produced small, basically Impressionist sketches from life that were intensely expressive and decorative in color, as well as works relating to fairytale and chivalrous subjects characteristic of Art Nouveau. In the 1910s, he traveled extensively, and took a trip to Moscow. While working in Murnau near Munich in 1908–1910, Kandi Read More
Born in Moscow in 1866. Died in Neuilly-sur-Seine in 1944. Kandinsky was the son of a prominent Siberian merchant. From an early age, he was fluent in Russian and German, and studied law at Moscow University. Having completed the course, he unexpectedly refused a position at Derpt (Dorpat/Tartu) University, and left for Germany to study painting. Two artistic impressions prompted Kandinsky to make this decision: the first was a visit to a peasant’s hut in the Volgograd province where he felt as if he had “entered” a painting, and the second—Monet’s painting, Haystack when he saw that it was “non-objective.” In 1896, Kandinsky went to study in Munich at Aschbe’s school (1897–1898), and then at the Academy of Arts (1900). The Munich period of Kandinsky’s creative work, which lasted up to 1914, produced small, basically Impressionist sketches from life that were intensely expressive and decorative in color, as well as works relating to fairytale and chivalrous subjects characteristic of Art Nouveau. In the 1910s, he traveled extensively, and took a trip to Moscow. While working in Murnau near Munich in 1908–1910, Kandinsky discovered a new concept of space and color, and created a new genre structure of painting: "impressions," "improvisations" and "compositions." In 1911, Kandinsky created his first abstract composition, put out a book Concerning the Spiritual in Art, and together with F. Marc created the “Blue Rider” (Blaue Reiter) association. When World War I broke out, he returned to Moscow where, after the revolution, he occupied various positions, including that of teacher. In 1921, he returned to Germany to work in Bauhaus. After the Nazis closed Bauhaus, he moved to Paris.

Works
Church in Murnau, A Study - circa 1908, oil on cardboard, Omsk Regional Museum of Fine Arts named after M. A. Vrubel
Improvisation No. 4 - 1909, oil on canvas, Nizhny Novgorod State Museum of Art
Winter Day. Smolensky Boulevard - circa 1916, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Moscow, Red Square - 1916, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Bolshiye Gorki hamlet, Vladimir province in 1873. Died in Moscow in 1943. Kliun was born to a peasant family. He served as a bookkeeper, and at the same time studied drawing. During 1902–1907, he attended classes at F.I. Rerberg’s studio in Moscow where he met I.I. Mashkov and K.S. Malevich. This encounter became a major factor in the creative biography of Ivan Kliun. Malevich had a great influence on the further development of the artist, brought him into the circle of the founders of the Russian avant-garde, set him on the path of Cubo-Futurism, and later Suprematism. At the “0.10” exhibition in Petrograd in 1915, Kliun displayed his cubist and abstract sculpture for the first time, and in 1916 began to create Suprematist compositions. Kliun was a member of the “Supremus” Society in 1916–1917. After the Suprematist period, he experienced an enthusiasm for French Purism. The artist then turned to Realism, which was not only a concession to the times, but also his inner need. He found himself in complete isolation at the end of his life.

Works
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Born in Bolshiye Gorki hamlet, Vladimir province in 1873. Died in Moscow in 1943. Kliun was born to a peasant family. He served as a bookkeeper, and at the same time studied drawing. During 1902–1907, he attended classes at F.I. Rerberg’s studio in Moscow where he met I.I. Mashkov and K.S. Malevich. This encounter became a major factor in the creative biography of Ivan Kliun. Malevich had a great influence on the further development of the artist, brought him into the circle of the founders of the Russian avant-garde, set him on the path of Cubo-Futurism, and later Suprematism. At the “0.10” exhibition in Petrograd in 1915, Kliun displayed his cubist and abstract sculpture for the first time, and in 1916 began to create Suprematist compositions. Kliun was a member of the “Supremus” Society in 1916–1917. After the Suprematist period, he experienced an enthusiasm for French Purism. The artist then turned to Realism, which was not only a concession to the times, but also his inner need. He found himself in complete isolation at the end of his life.

Works
Fleeting Landscape - 1913, wood, metal, oil, porcelain, wire, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in St. Petersburg in 1832 (1833). Died in the same city in 1902. Mikhail Klodt was a descendant of an art dynasty. His father was an engraver, his uncle was a sculptor, and his cousin was also a painter. Klodt studied at the Institute of Mining Engineers where drawing was taught, and later at the Academy of Arts (1851–1858). After receiving the Great Gold Medal, Klodt left on a pensioner’s trip across Germany, Switzerland and France (1858–1861). Upon his return, he lived and worked in St. Petersburg, and traveled to Russian provinces. Klodt was a professor and a member of the Academy of Arts Council. He was a founding member of the Association of Traveling Art Exhibitions in 1870, but left its ranks in 1880. However, he continued to display his landscapes at exhibitions put on by the Association.

Works
Cows at a Watering-Place - 1871, oil on canvas, Samara Art Museum
On a Ploughed Field - 1872, Read More
Born in St. Petersburg in 1832 (1833). Died in the same city in 1902. Mikhail Klodt was a descendant of an art dynasty. His father was an engraver, his uncle was a sculptor, and his cousin was also a painter. Klodt studied at the Institute of Mining Engineers where drawing was taught, and later at the Academy of Arts (1851–1858). After receiving the Great Gold Medal, Klodt left on a pensioner’s trip across Germany, Switzerland and France (1858–1861). Upon his return, he lived and worked in St. Petersburg, and traveled to Russian provinces. Klodt was a professor and a member of the Academy of Arts Council. He was a founding member of the Association of Traveling Art Exhibitions in 1870, but left its ranks in 1880. However, he continued to display his landscapes at exhibitions put on by the Association.

Works
Cows at a Watering-Place - 1871, oil on canvas, Samara Art Museum
On a Ploughed Field - 1872, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Slavyansk in the Kharkov province (now Ukraine) in 1876. Died in Moscow in 1956. Konchalovsky studied at the Julian Academy and at the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts. In 1910, he and his father-in-law, the renowned historical painter V.I. Surikov, went on a trip to Spain, which had a great influence on the style of the young painter. Konchalovsky was one of the founders of “The Jack of Diamonds” group that held its first exhibition in Moscow in December 1910. During the artist’s early period, his works were distinguished by simplification of color and generalization of spaces, deliberate coarseness and palpability of style, and a garish, cheerful, almost cheap popular beauty. At the end of the 1910s, Konchalovsky’s treatment of color changed drastically. His painting acquired light and airiness, which inevitably affected the quality of color and made him subject to new requirements. In the 1920s, the artist rejected some of Cezanne’s methods of landscape painting, and turned to the traditional techniques of the old masters, particularly the Venetian painters. The uniqueness of Konchalovsky’s creative work lies in the fact that, while rem Read More
Born in Slavyansk in the Kharkov province (now Ukraine) in 1876. Died in Moscow in 1956. Konchalovsky studied at the Julian Academy and at the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts. In 1910, he and his father-in-law, the renowned historical painter V.I. Surikov, went on a trip to Spain, which had a great influence on the style of the young painter. Konchalovsky was one of the founders of “The Jack of Diamonds” group that held its first exhibition in Moscow in December 1910. During the artist’s early period, his works were distinguished by simplification of color and generalization of spaces, deliberate coarseness and palpability of style, and a garish, cheerful, almost cheap popular beauty. At the end of the 1910s, Konchalovsky’s treatment of color changed drastically. His painting acquired light and airiness, which inevitably affected the quality of color and made him subject to new requirements. In the 1920s, the artist rejected some of Cezanne’s methods of landscape painting, and turned to the traditional techniques of the old masters, particularly the Venetian painters. The uniqueness of Konchalovsky’s creative work lies in the fact that, while remaining in high authority among artists, he was one of the officially recognized masters of socialist realism.

Works
A Bridge in Nara - 1918, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Young Oaks - 1923, oil on canvas, Samara Art Museum

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Born in Moscow in 1861. Died in Paris in 1939. It is strange that Korovin, a born painter, should begin his studies in the architectural department of the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. However, only several months later, he became a student of A.K. Savrasov, and later V.D. Polenov. Continuing the line of Savrasov and Polenov’s lyrical landscape, he arrived at the Impressionist vision of nature—a conveyance of light and air and creation directly from life—even before he saw the works of the French Impressionists in 1893. Korovin’s trip to the Russian North in 1894 had a great influence on him. Korovin was highly productive as an artist of the theater. He worked for S.I. Mamontov’s private opera from 1885, and in Imperial theaters later on. In 1923, he moved to Paris where he continued to work as a theatrical decorator and paint landscapes, particularly nocturnal scenes of Paris boulevards. Korovin was one of the most brilliant representatives of Impressionism in Russian art and he remained loyal to this trend in painting up to the end of the 1930s.

Works
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Born in Moscow in 1861. Died in Paris in 1939. It is strange that Korovin, a born painter, should begin his studies in the architectural department of the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. However, only several months later, he became a student of A.K. Savrasov, and later V.D. Polenov. Continuing the line of Savrasov and Polenov’s lyrical landscape, he arrived at the Impressionist vision of nature—a conveyance of light and air and creation directly from life—even before he saw the works of the French Impressionists in 1893. Korovin’s trip to the Russian North in 1894 had a great influence on him. Korovin was highly productive as an artist of the theater. He worked for S.I. Mamontov’s private opera from 1885, and in Imperial theaters later on. In 1923, he moved to Paris where he continued to work as a theatrical decorator and paint landscapes, particularly nocturnal scenes of Paris boulevards. Korovin was one of the most brilliant representatives of Impressionism in Russian art and he remained loyal to this trend in painting up to the end of the 1930s.

Works
In Winter - 1894, canvas on cardboard, oil. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Paris, Boulevard des Capucines - 1911, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Moscow in 1884. Died in the same city in 1958. As the son of an artist, Nikolai Krymov got his first lessons from his father, and then graduated from the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture in Vasnetsov’s class of landscape painting. He also followed the advice of V.A. Serov, A.Ye. Arkhipov, and L.O. Pasternak. His entire life is associated with Moscow. During the different periods of his creative life, he painted landscapes in various styles. At times he was inspired by classical European landscape of the 17th and 18th centuries, and sometimes by primitive childlike creativity. Beginning in 1905, Krymov grew closer to the artists who formed the “Blue Rose” society in 1907. In his works of that period, the reality of a perceived motif connects with the subjective vision of the artist, resulting in an imaginary world of symbolic landscapes. Krymov was also a member of the “Union of Russian Artists,” and in Soviet times was bestowed numerous honorary titles and was regarded as a patriarch of landscape painting. Krymov always devoted a great deal of attention to the most unassuming corners of nature, and had a gift for subtle co Read More
Born in Moscow in 1884. Died in the same city in 1958. As the son of an artist, Nikolai Krymov got his first lessons from his father, and then graduated from the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture in Vasnetsov’s class of landscape painting. He also followed the advice of V.A. Serov, A.Ye. Arkhipov, and L.O. Pasternak. His entire life is associated with Moscow. During the different periods of his creative life, he painted landscapes in various styles. At times he was inspired by classical European landscape of the 17th and 18th centuries, and sometimes by primitive childlike creativity. Beginning in 1905, Krymov grew closer to the artists who formed the “Blue Rose” society in 1907. In his works of that period, the reality of a perceived motif connects with the subjective vision of the artist, resulting in an imaginary world of symbolic landscapes. Krymov was also a member of the “Union of Russian Artists,” and in Soviet times was bestowed numerous honorary titles and was regarded as a patriarch of landscape painting. Krymov always devoted a great deal of attention to the most unassuming corners of nature, and had a gift for subtle color and an almost epic outlook on nature.

Works
Moscow Landscape, A Rainbow - 1908, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Rose-Colored Winter - 1912, oil on canvas. Smolensk State Museum-Reserve
By the Mill - 1927, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Mariupol in 1842. Died in St. Petersburg in 1910. The son of a Greek shoemaker, Kuindzhi began to study painting in I.K. Aivazovsky’s studio in Feodosia. He worked as a retoucher of photographs in Mariupol, Odessa and St. Petersburg. He did not get a formal artistic education, which in many ways contributed to the originality of his artistic perception. Certain information has it that he attended the Academy of Arts as an auditor for a time, and in 1870 passed an exam for the title of free artist. He was a member of the Association of Traveling Art Exhibitions from 1875. He left the Association in 1880, but took part in its exhibitions on a regular basis up to 1900. Kuindzhi was acquainted with numerous Russian scientists of the day, in particular D.I. Mendeleyev who came up with the periodic table of chemical elements. In the 1890s, Kuindzhi became interested in the problem of how light affected the properties of color. Living in St. Petersburg, the artist often traveled across Russia (Ukraine, the Caucasus, Crimea) and Europe (France, England, Switzerland, Germany, Austria). From 1886, he spent the summer at his private home in the Crimea. He taught at the Academy Read More
Born in Mariupol in 1842. Died in St. Petersburg in 1910. The son of a Greek shoemaker, Kuindzhi began to study painting in I.K. Aivazovsky’s studio in Feodosia. He worked as a retoucher of photographs in Mariupol, Odessa and St. Petersburg. He did not get a formal artistic education, which in many ways contributed to the originality of his artistic perception. Certain information has it that he attended the Academy of Arts as an auditor for a time, and in 1870 passed an exam for the title of free artist. He was a member of the Association of Traveling Art Exhibitions from 1875. He left the Association in 1880, but took part in its exhibitions on a regular basis up to 1900. Kuindzhi was acquainted with numerous Russian scientists of the day, in particular D.I. Mendeleyev who came up with the periodic table of chemical elements. In the 1890s, Kuindzhi became interested in the problem of how light affected the properties of color. Living in St. Petersburg, the artist often traveled across Russia (Ukraine, the Caucasus, Crimea) and Europe (France, England, Switzerland, Germany, Austria). From 1886, he spent the summer at his private home in the Crimea. He taught at the Academy of Arts, and continued to work with his students after leaving the Academy. N.K. Roerich, A.A. Borisov and K.F. Bogayevsky were among his students. With his support, they organized the Society of Artists in 1909, which later became the Kuindzhi Society.

Works
A Birch Grove - 1879, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
The North - 1879, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Astrakhan in 1878. Died in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in 1927. Kustodiev studied in Astrakhan, and later at the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts. After graduating from the Academy in 1904, he visited France and Spain as a pensioner of the Academy. As one of Repin’s favorite pupils and a remarkable portrait painter, Kustodiev was invited by his teacher to work on a large ceremonial painting of members of the State Council. However, the artist expressed himself to the fullest in genre paintings on the subject of the Russian provincial way of life and the life of merchants. His paintings are festive and bright in color. Kustodiev was one of the younger representatives (a member from 1911) of the “World of Art Association.” In 1907–1910, he was a member of the Union of Russian Artists, and from 1923, a member of the Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia. In 1916, an illness confined Kustodiev to an invalid’s chair, but he kept on working in his usual cheerful manner. Merry Shrove-tide festivities were one of his favorite themes, which he painted from memory. A brilliant graphic artist, Kustodiev also created poignant caricatures and theatri Read More
Born in Astrakhan in 1878. Died in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in 1927. Kustodiev studied in Astrakhan, and later at the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts. After graduating from the Academy in 1904, he visited France and Spain as a pensioner of the Academy. As one of Repin’s favorite pupils and a remarkable portrait painter, Kustodiev was invited by his teacher to work on a large ceremonial painting of members of the State Council. However, the artist expressed himself to the fullest in genre paintings on the subject of the Russian provincial way of life and the life of merchants. His paintings are festive and bright in color. Kustodiev was one of the younger representatives (a member from 1911) of the “World of Art Association.” In 1907–1910, he was a member of the Union of Russian Artists, and from 1923, a member of the Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia. In 1916, an illness confined Kustodiev to an invalid’s chair, but he kept on working in his usual cheerful manner. Merry Shrove-tide festivities were one of his favorite themes, which he painted from memory. A brilliant graphic artist, Kustodiev also created poignant caricatures and theatrical art.

Works
Shrovetide - 1916, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Saratov in 1878. Died in Moscow in 1968. Kuznetsov was a pupil of the graphic arts school under the Radishchev Museum in Saratov, which was founded by A.N. Bogoliubov. He went to Moscow to continue his art studies at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. He was a student of K.A. Korovin and V.A. Serov. In 1905, he made a trip to Paris. In 1907, Kuznetsov was one of the organizers of the “Blue Rose” exhibition and association of artists-symbolists. The steppes beyond the Volga—a world the artist knew from childhood—appear as an ideal world where nature, animals and people come together in harmony. The refined colors of the painting, the individual style of graphic art and the fresco monumentality of the images have made Kuznetsov’s style recognizable. After the revolution, the artist turned to new images topical for the times without changing the style he developed in the 1910s. Kuznetsov belonged to the “Union of Russian Artists” and “The Four Arts” association.

Works
A Mir Read More
Born in Saratov in 1878. Died in Moscow in 1968. Kuznetsov was a pupil of the graphic arts school under the Radishchev Museum in Saratov, which was founded by A.N. Bogoliubov. He went to Moscow to continue his art studies at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. He was a student of K.A. Korovin and V.A. Serov. In 1905, he made a trip to Paris. In 1907, Kuznetsov was one of the organizers of the “Blue Rose” exhibition and association of artists-symbolists. The steppes beyond the Volga—a world the artist knew from childhood—appear as an ideal world where nature, animals and people come together in harmony. The refined colors of the painting, the individual style of graphic art and the fresco monumentality of the images have made Kuznetsov’s style recognizable. After the revolution, the artist turned to new images topical for the times without changing the style he developed in the 1910s. Kuznetsov belonged to the “Union of Russian Artists” and “The Four Arts” association.

Works
A Mirage in the Steppe - 1912, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Mirage in the Steppe - 1913, oil on canvas. Smolensk State Museum-Reserve
Cleaning a Carpet - 1914 - 1915, oil on canvas. Nizhny Novgorod State Museum of Art

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Tiraspol in the Kherson province in 1881. Died in Fontenay-au-Rose, France in 1964. Mikhail Larionov was the son of a military paramedic. He spent his childhood in the south of Russia in Tiraspol, which he later frequently revisited to do summer sketches. He studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture under I.I. Levitan, V.A. Serov and K.A. Korovin. There he met N.S. Goncharova who later became his wife and associate in artistic experimentation. French painting greatly influenced the formation of Larionov’s creative individuality. He learned about it from S.I. Shchukin’s Moscow collection and his trip to Paris in 1906. From the beginning of the 1900s, Larionov actively participated in art exhibitions not only in Russia, but also in Europe. In 1907, he turned to Primitivism based on the traditions of urban folklore. Larionov was the leader of the Russian avant-garde movement. In the words of A.V. Lentulov, his paintings “gave new emotion and aligned the eye of the beholder in a new way.” In 1910, he and Goncharova organized major avant-garde exhibitions of “The Jack of Diamonds,” “Donkey’s Tail” Read More
Born in Tiraspol in the Kherson province in 1881. Died in Fontenay-au-Rose, France in 1964. Mikhail Larionov was the son of a military paramedic. He spent his childhood in the south of Russia in Tiraspol, which he later frequently revisited to do summer sketches. He studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture under I.I. Levitan, V.A. Serov and K.A. Korovin. There he met N.S. Goncharova who later became his wife and associate in artistic experimentation. French painting greatly influenced the formation of Larionov’s creative individuality. He learned about it from S.I. Shchukin’s Moscow collection and his trip to Paris in 1906. From the beginning of the 1900s, Larionov actively participated in art exhibitions not only in Russia, but also in Europe. In 1907, he turned to Primitivism based on the traditions of urban folklore. Larionov was the leader of the Russian avant-garde movement. In the words of A.V. Lentulov, his paintings “gave new emotion and aligned the eye of the beholder in a new way.” In 1910, he and Goncharova organized major avant-garde exhibitions of “The Jack of Diamonds,” “Donkey’s Tail” and “Target” groups. In 1912, the artist launched a new artistic concept, “Rayonism,” one of the first systems of non-objective art where forms are created by intersecting reflected rays of various objects. In 1914, Larionov was called up to the army when World War I began. Soon afterwards, the artist was wounded and discharged from the service. In 1915, at the invitation of S.P. Diagilev, he and Goncharova moved to Paris where he did a great deal of work for the theater. In his paintings and easel graphic art of the Paris period, Larionov returned to figurative art, creating refined lyrical works.

Works
A Laid Table By the Water - beginning of the decade 1920, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in Luga in 1891. Died in St. Peterburg province in 1972. Boris Lebedinsky was the son of a teacher. He studied in St. Petersburg at the Central Technical Design School of Baron Schtiglitz in 1910–1911 and at the school of the Society for the Promotion of Artists in 1911–1916. A.A. Rylov and N.K. Roerich were his teachers. The artist remained loyal to Realism his entire life. While still a student, Lebedinsky began to take part in art exhibitions, and in 1914 exhibited his works at the exhibition of Russian graphic art in Leipzig. When he was introduced to Siberian nature in 1916, the artist was captured by the epic force of the Baikal landscape, and in 1917 moved to Irkutsk. In 1918, Lebedinsky became a member of the Eastern Siberian department of the Russian Geographic Society and a participant of Siberian expeditions, and in 1920, the president of the Irkutsk Society of Artists. In 1925, he organized the first Siberian art exhibition in Irkutsk. From 1925 to 1928, Lebedinsky was the curator of the art gallery of the City Museum (now the Irkutsk Regional Museum of Art). In 1942–1944, he lived in Leningrad, in Staraya Russa, and in the Gorky region. After re Read More
Born in Luga in 1891. Died in St. Peterburg province in 1972. Boris Lebedinsky was the son of a teacher. He studied in St. Petersburg at the Central Technical Design School of Baron Schtiglitz in 1910–1911 and at the school of the Society for the Promotion of Artists in 1911–1916. A.A. Rylov and N.K. Roerich were his teachers. The artist remained loyal to Realism his entire life. While still a student, Lebedinsky began to take part in art exhibitions, and in 1914 exhibited his works at the exhibition of Russian graphic art in Leipzig. When he was introduced to Siberian nature in 1916, the artist was captured by the epic force of the Baikal landscape, and in 1917 moved to Irkutsk. In 1918, Lebedinsky became a member of the Eastern Siberian department of the Russian Geographic Society and a participant of Siberian expeditions, and in 1920, the president of the Irkutsk Society of Artists. In 1925, he organized the first Siberian art exhibition in Irkutsk. From 1925 to 1928, Lebedinsky was the curator of the art gallery of the City Museum (now the Irkutsk Regional Museum of Art). In 1942–1944, he lived in Leningrad, in Staraya Russa, and in the Gorky region. After returning to Siberia, he taught at the Irkutsk Art School and at other educational establishments of city. Lebedinsky’s legacy includes drawings, graphic albums and paintings dedicated to the past of Irkutsk and the nature of the Baikal region.

Works
Wild Rosemary in the East Sayan Mountains - 1922,  oil on canvas. Irkutsk Regional Art Museum named after V. P. Sukachev
The Tale of Baikal - no date, oil on canvas, Irkutsk Regional Art Museum named after V. P. Sukachev

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in the village of Vorona in Penza province in 1882. Died in Moscow in 1943. Lentulov received his artistic education at the Penza and Kiev art schools and at the St. Petersburg studio of D. Kardovsky. He lived in Moscow from 1909. He became one of the founders of “The Jack of Diamonds” group (1910). In 1911–1912, he studied at the Le Fauconnier studio and the La Palette Academy in Paris. There he got to know the new generation of French painters—Gleizes, Metzinger, Léger and Delaunay—and joined the ranks of the Cubo-Futurists. His Paris friends called him a “Futurist à la russe.” However, Lentulov by no means became an imitator of the Paris school. He re-interpreted the impressions he gained abroad according to his own exceptional talent and temperament. After returning from Paris, the artist created a number of panels depicting architectural monuments of Moscow. These works combine the natural impression from medieval architecture, traditional folkloric brightness and a Cubo-Futurist transformation of form. In many of his works from the 1910s, Lentulov used pasted objects. His landscapes of the 1920s retained the exagge Read More
Born in the village of Vorona in Penza province in 1882. Died in Moscow in 1943. Lentulov received his artistic education at the Penza and Kiev art schools and at the St. Petersburg studio of D. Kardovsky. He lived in Moscow from 1909. He became one of the founders of “The Jack of Diamonds” group (1910). In 1911–1912, he studied at the Le Fauconnier studio and the La Palette Academy in Paris. There he got to know the new generation of French painters—Gleizes, Metzinger, Léger and Delaunay—and joined the ranks of the Cubo-Futurists. His Paris friends called him a “Futurist à la russe.” However, Lentulov by no means became an imitator of the Paris school. He re-interpreted the impressions he gained abroad according to his own exceptional talent and temperament. After returning from Paris, the artist created a number of panels depicting architectural monuments of Moscow. These works combine the natural impression from medieval architecture, traditional folkloric brightness and a Cubo-Futurist transformation of form. In many of his works from the 1910s, Lentulov used pasted objects. His landscapes of the 1920s retained the exaggerated brightness of color, and acquired new pictorial monumentality. Lentulov taught at the Higher State Art and Craft Shops (Vkhutemas), and was one of the organizers of the Society of Moscow Artists.

Works
Landscape with a Red House - 1910s, oil on canvas. Samara Art Museum
Vasiliy the Blessed Cathedral - 1913, oil on canvas, glued on paper labels. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Nizhny Novgorod - 1915, oil on canvas, bronze. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Landscape With Dry Trees, Sergiev Posad - 1920, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Born in the Kibarty trading quarter near Verzhbolovo (Virbalis) in Suvalki province (now Lithuania) in 1860. Died in Moscow in 1900. Levitan was the son of a railroad employee. During 1873–1883, he studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture under A.K. Savrasov and V.D. Polenov. He earned a living by giving private lessons, and worked for a number of journals that published his drawings and lithographs. He worked in the decor workshop of S.I. Mamontov’s private opera, taught painting in fine arts classes, and from 1892, taught at the Moscow school where his students included M.F. Larionov, P.V. Kuznetsov and M.S. Saryan. Every year, Levitan traveled to the Moscow area to work on sketches, and went on more distant trips across Russia to the Crimea and Volga areas. He also visited European countries: Germany, France and Italy. Levitan was a member of the Moscow Art Lovers Society from 1888, a member of the Association of Traveling Exhibitions from 1891, and a member of the Munich Secession trend from 1897. In 1898, he was bestowed the title of Academician. Levitan worked in oils and watercolors, he was a graphic artist, and he created several pas Read More
Born in the Kibarty trading quarter near Verzhbolovo (Virbalis) in Suvalki province (now Lithuania) in 1860. Died in Moscow in 1900. Levitan was the son of a railroad employee. During 1873–1883, he studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture under A.K. Savrasov and V.D. Polenov. He earned a living by giving private lessons, and worked for a number of journals that published his drawings and lithographs. He worked in the decor workshop of S.I. Mamontov’s private opera, taught painting in fine arts classes, and from 1892, taught at the Moscow school where his students included M.F. Larionov, P.V. Kuznetsov and M.S. Saryan. Every year, Levitan traveled to the Moscow area to work on sketches, and went on more distant trips across Russia to the Crimea and Volga areas. He also visited European countries: Germany, France and Italy. Levitan was a member of the Moscow Art Lovers Society from 1888, a member of the Association of Traveling Exhibitions from 1891, and a member of the Munich Secession trend from 1897. In 1898, he was bestowed the title of Academician. Levitan worked in oils and watercolors, he was a graphic artist, and he created several pastels. He was a remarkable Russian lyrical landscapist, a master of “mood landscapes” in which the wide and boundless spaces of Russian nature are often colored in melancholic and elegiac tones.

Works
Quiet Abode - 1890, oil on canvas. State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Before the Storm (Clouds) - 1890, oil on canvas, Smolensk State Museum-Reserve
October (Autumn) - 1891, oil on canvas, Samara Art Museum
Above Eternal Peace - 1894, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Autumn, A Country Estate - 1894, pastels on paper, Omsk Regional Museum of Fine Arts named after M. A. Vrubel
Golden Autumn - 1895, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Fresh Breeze, The Volga - 1895, oil on canvas, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

© 2003, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Become familiar with some of the best known landscape painters in Canada and Russia (1860-1940)
  • Relate the experiences of landscape painters, their geography, and their era, to the style and elements in their work
  • Compare the life experiences of landscape painters in Russia and Canada working during the period 1860-1940

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