Due to the influence of ecological thinking, our perception of nature is currently tinged with a profound sense of unease. The works brought together in this section all highlight the fragility of the environment. The artists who made them demonstrate a commitment to generating awareness and showing, among other things, how the landscape around us has become a site of unprecedented catastrophes and disasters. They therefore directly or indirectly deal with the question of climate change and present, in a thoroughly convincing manner, the potential for improvement that resides in individual action.
Due to the influence of ecological thinking, our perception of nature is currently tinged with a profound sense of unease. The works brought together in this section all highlight the fragility of the environment. The artists who made them demonstrate a commitment to generating awareness and showing, among other things, how the landscape around us has become a site of unprecedented catastrophes and disasters. They therefore directly or indirectly deal with the question of climate change and present, in a thoroughly convincing manner, the potential for improvement that resides in individual action.

© Galerie de l'UQAM 2007. All rights reserved

Tapis stressé

Cardboard milk cartons

Artist: Jean-Jules Soucy, Photo: Denis Farley
2003
© Jean-Jules Soucy


Tapis stressé [Crazy Carpet] constitutes one component of a massive project entitled L’œuvre pinte [The Pint Work]. And it is indeed a carpet, one whose pattern evokes the traditional arrowhead sash worn by Québec’s voyageurs at the time of the fur trade. To complete the piece, which covers an area of 40 square feet, the artist asked members of the community to save, wash, dry and assemble the some 60,000 cardboard milk cartons that went into it. The project derives its meaning and power from the scope of the effort involved and would not have been possible otherwise. Soucy is one of those artists who mixes art and social life. He practises what he calls "committed assemblage," a form of art in which the work as such is to be looked for more in the communication that is set up with the public. Collecting the many milk containers required brought the members of the community together around a common task, while also informing them that milk cartons were henceforth recyclable. The artist’s ecological concerns generated a very colourful object and led people to adamantly amass everyday containers as part of a consciousness-raising endeavour.

Tapis stressé [Crazy Carpet] constitutes one component of a massive project entitled L’œuvre pinte [The Pint Work]. And it is indeed a carpet, one whose pattern evokes the traditional arrowhead sash worn by Québec’s voyageurs at the time of the fur trade. To complete the piece, which covers an area of 40 square feet, the artist asked members of the community to save, wash, dry and assemble the some 60,000 cardboard milk cartons that went into it. The project derives its meaning and power from the scope of the effort involved and would not have been possible otherwise. Soucy is one of those artists who mixes art and social life. He practises what he calls "committed assemblage," a form of art in which the work as such is to be looked for more in the communication that is set up with the public. Collecting the many milk containers required brought the members of the community together around a common task, while also informing them that milk cartons were henceforth recyclable. The artist’s ecological concerns generated a very colourful object and led people to adamantly amass everyday containers as part of a consciousness-raising endeavour.

© Galerie de l'UQAM 2007. All rights reserved

Views of the installation presented at the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal.

Artist: Jean-Jules Soucy, Photo: Denis Farley

cardboard milk cartons
© Jean-Jules Soucy


Jean-Jules Soucy is a native of the town of La Baie in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region, where he continues to reside and work. His art practice, which extends over more than two decades, is distinctive for the way it combines installation and sculpture, and for how it encourages the community to take part in making art which, as a result, is all the better received by the public.

selected exhibitions
2006 Symposium de Baie-Saint-Paul, Baie-St-Paul (Québec) [Guy Sioui Durand, curator] 2005 The Stationary Bicycle Tour of Canada, an intervention carried out in various Canadian artists’ centres 2000 L’arrêt à la Baie, Musée du Fjord, La Baie (Québec) 1997 Signalisation en Ti-cristaux, during the 3e Symposium en arts visuels de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Amos (Québec) 1993 L’œuvre pinte, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montréal (Québec) [Réal Lussier, curator]
Jean-Jules Soucy is a native of the town of La Baie in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region, where he continues to reside and work. His art practice, which extends over more than two decades, is distinctive for the way it combines installation and sculpture, and for how it encourages the community to take part in making art which, as a result, is all the better received by the public.

selected exhibitions
  • 2006 Symposium de Baie-Saint-Paul, Baie-St-Paul (Québec) [Guy Sioui Durand, curator]
  • 2005 The Stationary Bicycle Tour of Canada, an intervention carried out in various Canadian artists’ centres
  • 2000 L’arrêt à la Baie, Musée du Fjord, La Baie (Québec)
  • 1997 Signalisation en Ti-cristaux, during the 3e Symposium en arts visuels de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Amos (Québec)
  • 1993 L’œuvre pinte, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montréal (Québec) [Réal Lussier, curator]

© Galerie de l'UQAM 2007. All rights reserved

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • demonstrate an understanding of how science and art can be linked;
  • try to explain the state of mind of the artist when he made this art piece.

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