Identity refers to what is unique or distinctive about an individual or group. Every community constructs its image of itself around symbols, pictures, texts, rituals, customs and objects that establish it and enable it to differentiate itself from other groups. Identity may refer to the nation to which an individual belongs, or to one's gender or culture. It also appears to reside in the ways in which peoples come to talk about themselves over time.
Identity refers to what is unique or distinctive about an individual or group. Every community constructs its image of itself around symbols, pictures, texts, rituals, customs and objects that establish it and enable it to differentiate itself from other groups. Identity may refer to the nation to which an individual belongs, or to one's gender or culture. It also appears to reside in the ways in which peoples come to talk about themselves over time.

© Galerie de l'UQAM 2007. All rights reserved

installation

3 digital prints on photographic paper, video (16 min), television, furniture, etc., varied dimensions

Photo: Mathieu Beauséjour

© Mathieu Beauséjour


After coming across an English translation of the FLQ manifesto in an anthology of political writings, Mathieu Beauséjour decided to take a second look at this very Marxist-sounding text. His work 1 ½ Métro Côte-des-Neiges refers to the time that the members of the FLQ demanded their manifesto be read on television during the 1970 October Crisis. By facilitating a reading of the English version of the text, the artist decontextualized it and separated it from its original purpose as an expression of Francophone linguistic identity. He presented it in a video shown in an installation environment that resembled an apartment where some members of the FLQ hid out. Their minimal furnishings were intended to undermine the radical import of their document. Beauséjour’s work was designed to confront viewers, to question them about their knowledge of the manifesto and the conditions in which it was read. In this way, the artist tackled an event that occupies a mythological place in Québec history, one that still sparks heated debate.

To view an excerpt of the video, please follow this Read More
After coming across an English translation of the FLQ manifesto in an anthology of political writings, Mathieu Beauséjour decided to take a second look at this very Marxist-sounding text. His work 1 ½ Métro Côte-des-Neiges refers to the time that the members of the FLQ demanded their manifesto be read on television during the 1970 October Crisis. By facilitating a reading of the English version of the text, the artist decontextualized it and separated it from its original purpose as an expression of Francophone linguistic identity. He presented it in a video shown in an installation environment that resembled an apartment where some members of the FLQ hid out. Their minimal furnishings were intended to undermine the radical import of their document. Beauséjour’s work was designed to confront viewers, to question them about their knowledge of the manifesto and the conditions in which it was read. In this way, the artist tackled an event that occupies a mythological place in Québec history, one that still sparks heated debate.

To view an excerpt of the video, please follow this link.

© Galerie de l'UQAM 2007. All rights reserved

1 ½ Métro Côte-des-Neiges, 2006

Photo: Mathieu Beauséjour

© Mathieu Beauséjour


1 ½ Métro Côte-des-Neiges, 2006

Photo: Mathieu Beauséjour

© Mathieu Beauséjour


A self-taught artist, Mathieu Beauséjour has been exhibiting his installations since the mid-1990s. In addition, he works as an activist and publishes multiples. Two of his projects, Survival Virus de Survie and International Numismatic Virology, have been presented at various places in Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain and Serbia. He has been selected for residencies in Paris and London, and is also the coordinator of the Clark Artists’ Centre.

selected exhibitions
2007 Monument, Fonderie Darling, Montréal (Québec) 2006 1 1/2 Métro Côte-des-Neiges, Vox, Centre de l’image contemporaine, Montréal (Québec) [Marie-Josée Jean, curator] 2005 La Manif d’art 3 : Cynisme?, Québec (Québec) [Patrice Loubier and André-Louis Paré, curators] 2003 L’emploi du temps, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (Québec) [Anne-Marie Ninacs, curator]
A self-taught artist, Mathieu Beauséjour has been exhibiting his installations since the mid-1990s. In addition, he works as an activist and publishes multiples. Two of his projects, Survival Virus de Survie and International Numismatic Virology, have been presented at various places in Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain and Serbia. He has been selected for residencies in Paris and London, and is also the coordinator of the Clark Artists’ Centre.

selected exhibitions
  • 2007 Monument, Fonderie Darling, Montréal (Québec)
  • 2006 1 1/2 Métro Côte-des-Neiges, Vox, Centre de l’image contemporaine, Montréal (Québec) [Marie-Josée Jean, curator]
  • 2005 La Manif d’art 3 : Cynisme?, Québec (Québec) [Patrice Loubier and André-Louis Paré, curators]
  • 2003 L’emploi du temps, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (Québec) [Anne-Marie Ninacs, curator]

© Galerie de l'UQAM 2007. All rights reserved

FLQ (Front de libération du Québec)

An extremist group that went public with its revolutionary platform by using propaganda and terrorism as tools to call for the overthrow of the Québec government, Québec’s separation from Canada and the establishment of a proletarian society. The FLQ was founded in March 1963, at a time when Québec was undergoing substantial changes such as industrial expansion and the modernization of the State. The movement’s activities came to a halt in 1971.

Manifesto

A published document used by a group to publicize its political platform. While the content of manifestos may be literary, artistic or social, their function is always and everywhere political. They stress the need for urgent action, adopting a tone that is both colloquial and elevated. Finally, manifestoes are different from garden variety pamphlets in that they are issued by a group which identifies itself as having popular support and targets specific individuals, who are often named.

Marxism

A leftist political ideology worked out by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in the 19th century. It Read More
FLQ (Front de libération du Québec)

An extremist group that went public with its revolutionary platform by using propaganda and terrorism as tools to call for the overthrow of the Québec government, Québec’s separation from Canada and the establishment of a proletarian society. The FLQ was founded in March 1963, at a time when Québec was undergoing substantial changes such as industrial expansion and the modernization of the State. The movement’s activities came to a halt in 1971.

Manifesto

A published document used by a group to publicize its political platform. While the content of manifestos may be literary, artistic or social, their function is always and everywhere political. They stress the need for urgent action, adopting a tone that is both colloquial and elevated. Finally, manifestoes are different from garden variety pamphlets in that they are issued by a group which identifies itself as having popular support and targets specific individuals, who are often named.

Marxism

A leftist political ideology worked out by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in the 19th century. It started from the premise that the means of production (factories, businesses, etc.) are controlled by a few individuals. In Marxist thinking, the dominant classes use their political power to more effectively exploit the rest of society. Marxism advocated collective ownership of the means of production as an alternative to class society.

October Crisis

This refers to the kidnapping, by members of the Front de libération du Québec, of James Cross, the British government’s trade commissioner in Montréal, and of Pierre Laporte, Québec’s Minister of Labour and Immigration. Cross was seized on October 5, 1970, and Laporte five days later. The kidnappers’ demands, communicated in a series of public announcements, called for the release of fellow FLQ members from prison and for a reading of their manifesto over the radio. Canada’s Prime Minister, Pierre Elliott Trudeau, responded by having his government pass the War Measures Act, which led to the arrest without warrant of over 450 people. Most were subsequently freed without being charged or having to appear in court. While Cross was eventually released unharmed, Laporte was found dead in the trunk of a car in Montréal.

© Galerie de l'UQAM 2007. All rights reserved

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • demonstrate an understanding of how science and art can be linked;
  • try to explain the state of mind of the artist when he made this art piece.

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