Want to make the ocean a safer place for killer whales to live? You can help by supporting the scientists in their quest to find out more about these mysterious animals. The more we know about killer whales and other cetaceans, the better we can help them.

If you’re on the coast and see a cetacean, try to stay at least 100 metres away and report your sighting. Even if you’re not by the water, you can help by adopting a killer whale!

Want to make the ocean a safer place for killer whales to live? You can help by supporting the scientists in their quest to find out more about these mysterious animals. The more we know about killer whales and other cetaceans, the better we can help them.

If you’re on the coast and see a cetacean, try to stay at least 100 metres away and report your sighting. Even if you’re not by the water, you can help by adopting a killer whale!

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

Have you seen a whale, dolphin, porpoise or sea turtle off the coast of B.C.? If so, you can report it in the following ways:

Call 1-866-I-SAW-ONE (1-866-472-9663) Email sightings@vanaqua.org Fill out the web form
If you're out on the water a lot and see cetaceans often, you can also ask for a logbook to record all your sightings.

What to report

Spotting a whale, porpoise or dolphin in the wild is not only an amazing experience, but also one that can help protect the very animals we’re watching. Here is some information that the B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network will be asking for:

WHO did you see? What did they look like? What species? How certain are you of it? WHEN was the date and time of Read More
Have you seen a whale, dolphin, porpoise or sea turtle off the coast of B.C.? If so, you can report it in the following ways:

  • Call 1-866-I-SAW-ONE (1-866-472-9663)
  • Email sightings@vanaqua.org
  • Fill out the web form

If you're out on the water a lot and see cetaceans often, you can also ask for a logbook to record all your sightings.

What to report

Spotting a whale, porpoise or dolphin in the wild is not only an amazing experience, but also one that can help protect the very animals we’re watching. Here is some information that the B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network will be asking for:

  • WHO did you see? What did they look like? What species? How certain are you of it?
  • WHEN was the date and time of the sighting?
  • WHERE did you see them? Knowing the latitude and longitude of your location is great, but you can also describe your location in relation to a major landmark, like an island.
  • WHAT were they doing? Can you describe their behaviour?
  • HOW many were there?
  • WHAT were the sighting conditions? Was it clear and sunny? Rainy and cloudy?
The weird stuff

The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network is also interested in any observations of unusual behaviours, such as:
  • Killer whales taking fish from fishing gear
  • Killer whale predation
  • Dead killer whales, either floating or stranded

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

Closeup of a green sea turtle

Photo : T. Westman

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.


The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network also tracks sightings of sea turtles. if you see a sea turtle off the Pacific coast, be sure to let them know!
The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network also tracks sightings of sea turtles. if you see a sea turtle off the Pacific coast, be sure to let them know!

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

Everything we now know about killer whales comes from the hard work and research of marine scientists. After all, as recently as 30 years ago, people were as scared of them as they were of sharks!

There is still a lot we don’t know about these whales, like where they go in the winter and why half of all the newborns die before they reach their first birthdays.

You can help researchers answer these questions by adopting a killer whale. You’ll not only get to choose your own whale, but you’ll also get its photo, its story, an adoption certificate, and updates on how it’s doing.

For more information on the Killer Whale Adoption program, including a list of killer whales that are up for adoption, check out their website.
Everything we now know about killer whales comes from the hard work and research of marine scientists. After all, as recently as 30 years ago, people were as scared of them as they were of sharks!

There is still a lot we don’t know about these whales, like where they go in the winter and why half of all the newborns die before they reach their first birthdays.

You can help researchers answer these questions by adopting a killer whale. You’ll not only get to choose your own whale, but you’ll also get its photo, its story, an adoption certificate, and updates on how it’s doing.

For more information on the Killer Whale Adoption program, including a list of killer whales that are up for adoption, check out their website.

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

We love killer whales, but it’s possible to love them too much. Visitors come from all over the world to see our whales, but all this attention can be harmful if we’re not careful. The noise from boat motors can bother killer whales, who use sound to communicate and find food. Boat propellers can cut them if whale watchers get too close.

To make sure that we don’t bother the whales too much, experts have made a list of suggestions for whale watchers to follow. For example, they ask boaters to stay at least 100 metres away from whales and not to go in front of them.

If you’re going on a whale watching tour, choose an operator who follows those guidelines. You’ll be able to enjoy your encounter with killer whales without disturbing them too much.

A full list of the whale watching guidelines can be found at the B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network website.
We love killer whales, but it’s possible to love them too much. Visitors come from all over the world to see our whales, but all this attention can be harmful if we’re not careful. The noise from boat motors can bother killer whales, who use sound to communicate and find food. Boat propellers can cut them if whale watchers get too close.

To make sure that we don’t bother the whales too much, experts have made a list of suggestions for whale watchers to follow. For example, they ask boaters to stay at least 100 metres away from whales and not to go in front of them.

If you’re going on a whale watching tour, choose an operator who follows those guidelines. You’ll be able to enjoy your encounter with killer whales without disturbing them too much.

A full list of the whale watching guidelines can be found at the B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network website.

© Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre 2006. All rights reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • familiarize himself with the vocabulary used in biology;
  • assess human impacts on biodiversity, and identify ways of preserving biodiversity;
  • describe how personal actions help conserve natural resources and protect the environment in their region;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic nature of ecosystems.

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