The Biodôme's Laurentian Forest represents a deciduous forest (where the leaves actually drop in the fall). More specifically it is a sugar maple-yellow birch stand. This is the orange part on the map.

This kind of forest looks different, depending on the terrain. We chose a particular part of the La Mauricie Park, north of Trois-Rivières in Quebec, as our model. It is a hilly region in the southern part of the Laurentian plateau.

Sugar maples are the dominant species here. There are a number of companion species, the main one being yellow birch.
The Biodôme's Laurentian Forest represents a deciduous forest (where the leaves actually drop in the fall). More specifically it is a sugar maple-yellow birch stand. This is the orange part on the map.

This kind of forest looks different, depending on the terrain. We chose a particular part of the La Mauricie Park, north of Trois-Rivières in Quebec, as our model. It is a hilly region in the southern part of the Laurentian plateau.

Sugar maples are the dominant species here. There are a number of companion species, the main one being yellow birch.

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved

the Laurentian Forest at the Biodôme

The Laurentian Forest at the Biodôme

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Bioclimatic domains of the Southern Québec

Bioclimatic domains of the Southern Québec

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Ecosystems of North America

Ecosystems of North America

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


American Beech

Good companions
In addition to yellow birch, a number of species grow alongside the sugar maples in a sugar maple-yellow birch stand. One of the most common is American beech. There are also red maple, balsam fir, tamarack, eastern hemlock and American linden.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Striped Maple

Companion shrubs
The main shrubs are striped maple, mountain maple, mooseberry, American fly-honeysuckle, red-berried elder, ground hemlock and alternate-leaved dogwood.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Dwarf Cornel

Companion grasses
Sugar maple stands, like the sugar maple-yellow birch stand represented in the Biodôme’s Laurentian Forest, are home to many herbaceous spring plants.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Learn more about the ecosystems in the Americas;
  • Observe the diversity that each ecosystem offers regarding the flora, fauna as well as climate;
  • Identify the elements that shape different ecosystems, such as vegetation, wildlife, soil, etc.;
  • Develop different causes and consequences of human actions on ecosystems (from grade 4);
  • Formulate and justify possible solutions on issues, such as global warming, in order to preserve our ecosystems and biodiversity on Earth (from grade 6).