Animal Kitchen

Animals in captivity need to be fed a balanced diet that’s as close as possible to what and how they eat in the wild.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Canadian Lynx's Diet

In its natural environment, 75% of the Lynx’s diet is made up of hares. In captivity, it is much simpler to feed them on dead rats.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


A Meal fo Lynxes

1.1 kg horsemeat
2 half beef shank bones (on Wednesday)
2 rats (2 times a week)
8 theet diet biscuits (3 times a week)

NB: The menus are for two animals.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


American porcupine

Animals in captivity sometimes add variety to their diets by using resources in their new habitat, like plants growing on top of rocks.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


A Meal for the Porcupines

10 spinach leaves, 6 lettuce leaves, 1 carrot, 1 stick celery, 2 apples
2 half primate biscuits
Rabbit chow (all they can eat)
Vitamins and calcium
Salt block

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Beaver

In the wild, beavers, which are exclusively herbivorous, feed mainly on tree bark, leaves and buds. In captivity, to prevent them from destroying their habitat, we give them aspen branches to gnaw on.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


A meal for the beavers

2 lettuce leaves, 4 carrots, 2 half sticks celery, 8 spinach leaves, 8 apples
Rabbit chow (all they can eat)
Vitamins and calcium
Aspen branches

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


River otter

In the wild, otters feed mostly underwater. They eat fish, shellfish, insects, crayfish and frogs.
At the Biodôme, we don’t give them live prey. Instead, to keep them happy and simulate the way they would hunt for food in the wild, we give the otters a large block of ice filled with chunks of fish.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


A Meal for the Otters

2 minnows, herrings or sardines (3 times a week)
1.2 kg horsemeat
2 hard-boiled eggs (2 times a week)
10 theet diet biscuits (3 times a week)

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Learn more about the ecosystems in the Americas;
  • Observe the diversity that each ecosystem offers regarding the flora, fauna as well as climate;
  • Identify the elements that shape different ecosystems, such as vegetation, wildlife, soil, etc.;
  • Develop different causes and consequences of human actions on ecosystems (from grade 4);
  • Formulate and justify possible solutions on issues, such as global warming, in order to preserve our ecosystems and biodiversity on Earth (from grade 6).

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