Hybrid Practices covers works in which painting develops through contact with other artistic disciplines to become, for example, an object-painting, a text-painting or a photograph-painting. The resulting fusion opens up painting to the multiple possibilities offered by photography, text, collage, three-dimensional work and installation.
Hybrid Practices covers works in which painting develops through contact with other artistic disciplines to become, for example, an object-painting, a text-painting or a photograph-painting. The resulting fusion opens up painting to the multiple possibilities offered by photography, text, collage, three-dimensional work and installation.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Simon Bilodeau, 2011, partitions, site-specific, installation

Photo: Guy L’Heureux, courtesy Art Mûr, Montreal

Simon Bilodeau
2011
Acrylic and latex on canvas
Variable dimensions
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


In Simon Bilodeau’s practice, each image is created in close correlation to the way it is to be exhibited. With a careful eye to spatial layout, he methodically plans the hanging of his paintings and the staging of his sculptural installations. And often he has partitions, pedestals and other site-specific display devices built to measure. His paintings are done in the grey tones of the black and white he has used exclusively since 2004, and the sober palette heightens the symbolic force of the motifs. Subjects such as the exploitation of natural resources recur in his work, but when he highlights the obsolescence or paradoxical nature of certain ideologies, he does so without promoting a particular stance. The iconography of the paintings in the installation Le monde est un zombie is based on symbols of armed conflict. Various warplanes are reproduced with an illustrator’s precision, and signs of explosions contrast with the textures formed by the built-up layers of paint. With this work, which also includes a sculptural component, Bilodeau raises the far broader question of the future of post-industrial societies.
In Simon Bilodeau’s practice, each image is created in close correlation to the way it is to be exhibited. With a careful eye to spatial layout, he methodically plans the hanging of his paintings and the staging of his sculptural installations. And often he has partitions, pedestals and other site-specific display devices built to measure. His paintings are done in the grey tones of the black and white he has used exclusively since 2004, and the sober palette heightens the symbolic force of the motifs. Subjects such as the exploitation of natural resources recur in his work, but when he highlights the obsolescence or paradoxical nature of certain ideologies, he does so without promoting a particular stance. The iconography of the paintings in the installation Le monde est un zombie is based on symbols of armed conflict. Various warplanes are reproduced with an illustrator’s precision, and signs of explosions contrast with the textures formed by the built-up layers of paint. With this work, which also includes a sculptural component, Bilodeau raises the far broader question of the future of post-industrial societies.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Marie-Claude Bouthillier, environment, canvas

Photo: Yan Giguère, courtesy Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal

Marie-Claude Bouthillier
2010
Installation
213 x 335 x 335 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Visiting Dans le ventre de la baleine is like entering an extraordinary world, a unique place in which the artist has hand-covered every iota of surface. Countless pieces of painted canvas blanket the walls and encase the content. The omnipresent fabric and its odour heighten the sense of being inside the physical matter of a painting. With this environment, Marie-Claude Bouthilier explores issues specific to the medium: the hypnotic grid motif underscores the perceptual properties of paint and highlights the tactile qualities of canvas. The room replicates the proportions of her studio. This detail points up the reference to art workplaces and invites viewers to consider the work in the perspective of art history and the reproduction of famous studios. The title refers to the notions of transformation and process inherent to any act of creation, reflecting on the properties of a space whose configuration evokes a place of gestation: the artist’s studio.
Visiting Dans le ventre de la baleine is like entering an extraordinary world, a unique place in which the artist has hand-covered every iota of surface. Countless pieces of painted canvas blanket the walls and encase the content. The omnipresent fabric and its odour heighten the sense of being inside the physical matter of a painting. With this environment, Marie-Claude Bouthilier explores issues specific to the medium: the hypnotic grid motif underscores the perceptual properties of paint and highlights the tactile qualities of canvas. The room replicates the proportions of her studio. This detail points up the reference to art workplaces and invites viewers to consider the work in the perspective of art history and the reproduction of famous studios. The title refers to the notions of transformation and process inherent to any act of creation, reflecting on the properties of a space whose configuration evokes a place of gestation: the artist’s studio.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Sarah Cale, 2011, abstraction, collage, canvas

Photo: Sarah Cale, courtesy Jessica Bradley Art + Projects, Toronto

Sarah Cale
2011
Acrylic and glue on linen
167,6 x 134,6 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Sarah Cale constructs her works one stroke at a time, paying special attention to the materiality of the paint in laying it on. She first applies the paint on a plastic surface, then peels it off once dry and transfers it to the final support. This three-step creative process creates a new dynamic between substance and form, as seen in Agitate, where the shapes produced by the brushstrokes appear to float above the picture plane. The two planes suddenly seem to converge, but not in the same pictorial space. Little by little the strokes arranged on the canvas reveal themselves in terms of form, colour and thickness, and the eye roams the multitude of elements fashioned one by one and imported into the work. Cale thus informs and engages the viewer’s gaze, inviting it to detect the disparity, to perceive the trompe l’oeil effect of collage.
Sarah Cale constructs her works one stroke at a time, paying special attention to the materiality of the paint in laying it on. She first applies the paint on a plastic surface, then peels it off once dry and transfers it to the final support. This three-step creative process creates a new dynamic between substance and form, as seen in Agitate, where the shapes produced by the brushstrokes appear to float above the picture plane. The two planes suddenly seem to converge, but not in the same pictorial space. Little by little the strokes arranged on the canvas reveal themselves in terms of form, colour and thickness, and the eye roams the multitude of elements fashioned one by one and imported into the work. Cale thus informs and engages the viewer’s gaze, inviting it to detect the disparity, to perceive the trompe l’oeil effect of collage.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Paintings of Arabella Campbell, 2011, site-specific installation, minimalism

Photo: Scott Massey,courtesy Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver

Arabella Campbell
2011
Acrylic on linen panels and framed photocopy of pages 174-175 of Light in Architecture and Art 16 e
16 elements - 91,4 x 61 cm, each
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


After visiting the Chinati Foundation, in Marfa, Texas, Arabella Campbell conceived A catalog of its own content, which plays across the fields of painting, sculpture and photography. Loosely appropriating the geometry of Dan Flavin’s Untitled (Marfa Project), a monumental installation composed of coloured industrial fluorescent tubes, and drawing on her memory of the experience, she made fifteen paintings that reproduce the pattern created by the light emanating from Flavin’s work. The paintings are all similar yet not identical, as each is a copy of the previous one. In Campbell’s site-specific installation, the paintings lean against the wall, filling its entire length, and a framed black-and-white photocopy of the pages of a book reproducing the Flavin piece also leans, in its frame. In hanging the photocopy near the paintings, the artist contrasts her memory of the installation with the way light is documented by the camera.
After visiting the Chinati Foundation, in Marfa, Texas, Arabella Campbell conceived A catalog of its own content, which plays across the fields of painting, sculpture and photography. Loosely appropriating the geometry of Dan Flavin’s Untitled (Marfa Project), a monumental installation composed of coloured industrial fluorescent tubes, and drawing on her memory of the experience, she made fifteen paintings that reproduce the pattern created by the light emanating from Flavin’s work. The paintings are all similar yet not identical, as each is a copy of the previous one. In Campbell’s site-specific installation, the paintings lean against the wall, filling its entire length, and a framed black-and-white photocopy of the pages of a book reproducing the Flavin piece also leans, in its frame. In hanging the photocopy near the paintings, the artist contrasts her memory of the installation with the way light is documented by the camera.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of DaveandJenn, accumulation, scultpural object, imaginary world, 2010

Photo: M.N. Hutchinson, courtesy TrépanierBaer Gallery, Calgary

DaveandJenn
2010
Acrylic and mixed media
182 x 335 x 23 cm
Collection particulière, Calgary
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


DaveandJenn build painted objects of great technical and iconographic complexity. Although their primary medium is painting, their process of accumulation is close to sculpture. Dozens of layers of resin are laid on and condensed into a single image. Each layer brings new elements, adding, overlaying and, necessarily, obliterating others. Nominally, the duo’s work is landscape painting, a quintessential Canadian genre, but their iconography draws on popular culture. The Black and the Eye-Alone pictures the artists at sunset in an imaginary world. Deep in the valley, oddly arranged large trees mingle with countless whimsical details, including a bicycle wheel and a few leftover party garlands. The black splotches scattered around the perimeter of the image are evident references to the history of painting and the drip technique. Linked by fine gold chains, they seem to portend the imminent liquefaction of the entire scene.
DaveandJenn build painted objects of great technical and iconographic complexity. Although their primary medium is painting, their process of accumulation is close to sculpture. Dozens of layers of resin are laid on and condensed into a single image. Each layer brings new elements, adding, overlaying and, necessarily, obliterating others. Nominally, the duo’s work is landscape painting, a quintessential Canadian genre, but their iconography draws on popular culture. The Black and the Eye-Alone pictures the artists at sunset in an imaginary world. Deep in the valley, oddly arranged large trees mingle with countless whimsical details, including a bicycle wheel and a few leftover party garlands. The black splotches scattered around the perimeter of the image are evident references to the history of painting and the drip technique. Linked by fine gold chains, they seem to portend the imminent liquefaction of the entire scene.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Michael Dumontier & Neil Farber, talking animals, stoic human beings, narrative, naive art

Photo: Michael Dumontier & Neil Farber, courtesy Division Gallery, Montreal

Michael Dumontier & Neil Farber
2011
Acrylic, marker and pen on paper
10 x 15 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


The world portrayed by Michael Dumontier and Neil Farber is peopled with talking animals and stoic human beings. Figures of all sorts encounter bizarre situations there, personifying a realm that is clearly absurd but draws its fantasy from reality. The mostly small paintings are characterized by a style that verges on naive art in the rendering of the motifs and the graphics of the writing. The text is added at the end of the process and usually determines the picture’s meaning. It is through the text that the narrative of each work is revealed, that a snake biting its tail becomes a wedding ring, that a list of gluttonous meals tells us why a fox is feeling ill, and that the reason for the conversation between a carrot and a little black figure can be deduced. Humour is never far away in the art of Dumontier and Farber, who jointly decide on the combination of elements for each piece. After more than fifteen years of collaboration, the essence of their work lies in a dialogue developed over time and still going strong.
The world portrayed by Michael Dumontier and Neil Farber is peopled with talking animals and stoic human beings. Figures of all sorts encounter bizarre situations there, personifying a realm that is clearly absurd but draws its fantasy from reality. The mostly small paintings are characterized by a style that verges on naive art in the rendering of the motifs and the graphics of the writing. The text is added at the end of the process and usually determines the picture’s meaning. It is through the text that the narrative of each work is revealed, that a snake biting its tail becomes a wedding ring, that a list of gluttonous meals tells us why a fox is feeling ill, and that the reason for the conversation between a carrot and a little black figure can be deduced. Humour is never far away in the art of Dumontier and Farber, who jointly decide on the combination of elements for each piece. After more than fifteen years of collaboration, the essence of their work lies in a dialogue developed over time and still going strong.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Graham Gillmore, 2011, appropriation, enamel paints

Photo: Eric Wolf, courtesy Monte Clark Gallery, Vancouver et Toronto

Graham Gillmore

Oil and enamel on panel
152,4 x 167,6 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Graham Gillmore appropriates all sorts of phrases and fragments of text for his works, drawing on personal experience and elements of popular culture such as greeting cards, song lyrics, TV shows and government forms. Although the borrowed words constitute the core of the paintings, they take on altered meaning in the context of compositions that put the pictorial substance front and centre. In Untitled (Cinderella, 2nd Version), proximity to the outline images of Disney’s Cinderella makes the phrase “Mother I’m sorry I tricked you” ring with irony. The connection with the fairy tale character is immediately apparent, but it is the combination of glossy oil and glistening enamel paints that catches and holds the eye. Routered into the material against an abstract ground of vibrant, textured colour fields and assorted lines, the words shed their significance to become mere motifs.
Graham Gillmore appropriates all sorts of phrases and fragments of text for his works, drawing on personal experience and elements of popular culture such as greeting cards, song lyrics, TV shows and government forms. Although the borrowed words constitute the core of the paintings, they take on altered meaning in the context of compositions that put the pictorial substance front and centre. In Untitled (Cinderella, 2nd Version), proximity to the outline images of Disney’s Cinderella makes the phrase “Mother I’m sorry I tricked you” ring with irony. The connection with the fairy tale character is immediately apparent, but it is the combination of glossy oil and glistening enamel paints that catches and holds the eye. Routered into the material against an abstract ground of vibrant, textured colour fields and assorted lines, the words shed their significance to become mere motifs.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Cynthia Girard, 2009, narrative installation, environment, abstraction, figuration

Photo: David Brandt, Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, courtesy Parisian Laundry, Montreal

Cynthia Girard

Installation
Variable dimensions
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


“I am a snake 

a bird 

a legless wanderer in colorful scales 

undulating my way through 

like a drunken paintbrush”
- Tous les oiseaux sont ici (poem), Cynthia Girard

Tous les oiseaux sont ici is a narrative installation about painting, in which Cynthia Girard addresses issues of representational space. The environment resembles a stage set where a surreal performance is taking place. To re-examine the traditional categories of art history, the artist reaches beyond the field of art and borrows from popular culture to create a unique combinations of paintings, sculptures, paper costumes and sound clips. Deftly calling conventions and hierarchies into question, she builds a singular space for reflection in an attempt to raise the discussion above the timeworn conflict between abstraction and figuration, between purely formal and narrative depiction. On opening nights for this installation, she dons a long paper snake costume and recites a poem in a performance that heightens the narrative aspect of the work. A door in the painterly set invites visitors into the installation space for an im Read More
“I am a snake 

a bird 

a legless wanderer in colorful scales 

undulating my way through 

like a drunken paintbrush”
- Tous les oiseaux sont ici (poem), Cynthia Girard

Tous les oiseaux sont ici is a narrative installation about painting, in which Cynthia Girard addresses issues of representational space. The environment resembles a stage set where a surreal performance is taking place. To re-examine the traditional categories of art history, the artist reaches beyond the field of art and borrows from popular culture to create a unique combinations of paintings, sculptures, paper costumes and sound clips. Deftly calling conventions and hierarchies into question, she builds a singular space for reflection in an attempt to raise the discussion above the timeworn conflict between abstraction and figuration, between purely formal and narrative depiction. On opening nights for this installation, she dons a long paper snake costume and recites a poem in a performance that heightens the narrative aspect of the work. A door in the painterly set invites visitors into the installation space for an immersive experience aimed at understanding how to escape from it.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Jeremy Hof, canvas, acrylic, abstraction, 2010

Photo: Jeremy Hof, courtesy the artist

Jeremy Hof
2010
Acrylic on wood panel
48,3 x 48,3 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Jeremy Hof treats paint like a sculptural medium. Spurning traditional painterly techniques and tools, such as laying paint on canvas with a brush, he has developed a method that might be described as archaeological excavation. First, he builds up multiple layers of coloured acrylic paint on a support. Then, once the paint has dried, he patiently sands it down to expose the multi-hued strata. Overall, his process is long and laborious, demanding a repeated series of gestures and calling on skills not typical of painting. But burrowing into the material in this way opens new painterly paths and revitalizes the possibilities of abstraction.
Jeremy Hof treats paint like a sculptural medium. Spurning traditional painterly techniques and tools, such as laying paint on canvas with a brush, he has developed a method that might be described as archaeological excavation. First, he builds up multiple layers of coloured acrylic paint on a support. Then, once the paint has dried, he patiently sands it down to expose the multi-hued strata. Overall, his process is long and laborious, demanding a repeated series of gestures and calling on skills not typical of painting. But burrowing into the material in this way opens new painterly paths and revitalizes the possibilities of abstraction.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Jessica Korderas, 2010, narrative, figuration, layered

Photo: Jessica Korderas, courtesy Gallery Page and Strange, Halifax

Jessica Korderas
2010
Resin and mixed media
45,72 x 33,02 x 7,62 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


The works of the series Isolated Thoughts picture the tenants of apartment buildings going about their physically close but unconnected lives. Jessica Korderas has created narrative scenes of what might be playing out under the same roof at the same time: everyday routines and surreal events, dramas and anecdotes, solitude and idleness, alienation and the supernatural. To stage the micro-stories of each work, the artist first constructed a set: a building facade made of illustration board. She then painted the figures, furniture and countless expressive minutiae on sheets of Mylar film and layered the images onto the low-relief surface. The build-up of resin-embedded material produces a sculptural painting alive with details.
The works of the series Isolated Thoughts picture the tenants of apartment buildings going about their physically close but unconnected lives. Jessica Korderas has created narrative scenes of what might be playing out under the same roof at the same time: everyday routines and surreal events, dramas and anecdotes, solitude and idleness, alienation and the supernatural. To stage the micro-stories of each work, the artist first constructed a set: a building facade made of illustration board. She then painted the figures, furniture and countless expressive minutiae on sheets of Mylar film and layered the images onto the low-relief surface. The build-up of resin-embedded material produces a sculptural painting alive with details.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Gwenessa Lam, oil on canvas, trompe l'oeil, composition, actual painting, 2010

Photo: Blaine Campbell, courtesy Republic Gallery, Vancouver

Gwenessa Lam
2010
Oil on canvas
45,7 x 61 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Gwenessa Lam explores the intersection between perception, memory and representation. In the series Shadows, she focuses on the everyday experience of space, depicting only the ghostly traces of pieces of furniture and other commonplace objects abstracted from their normal settings. The strangeness of Slit Shadow No. 2 derives not from the trompe l’oeil representation of the shadow but from the absence of the chair that caught the light. This composition is a reflection on the ephemeral nature of the shadow as a residue of a former presence, a sign of a double or alter ego in a parallel reality. With this mirror effect, the artist attempts to make visible the invisible markers that shape perception.
Gwenessa Lam explores the intersection between perception, memory and representation. In the series Shadows, she focuses on the everyday experience of space, depicting only the ghostly traces of pieces of furniture and other commonplace objects abstracted from their normal settings. The strangeness of Slit Shadow No. 2 derives not from the trompe l’oeil representation of the shadow but from the absence of the chair that caught the light. This composition is a reflection on the ephemeral nature of the shadow as a residue of a former presence, a sign of a double or alter ego in a parallel reality. With this mirror effect, the artist attempts to make visible the invisible markers that shape perception.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Stéphane La Rue, abstraction, visual language, 2010

Photo: Guy L’Heureux, courtesy Galeries Roger Bellemare et Christian Lambert, Montreal, and TrépanierBaer Gallery, Calgary

Stéphane La Rue
2010
Graphite powder on wood
119,6 x 93,6 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Stéphane La Rue favours a spare approach that emphasizes the materiality of paint in a practice that incorporates aspects of drawing and sculpture. Out of Shape No. 2 cannot be viewed solely as a painting, since it is both image and object. Its creative process is based on the properties of visual language. The materials, forms, outlines and surface lines, the colours of the unfinished wood and densely dark graphite powder, the textures, motifs and volumes – all these pictorial elements interact on an equal footing, with no hierarchy. And if the surface can be perceived in different ways, it is because this type of work, cut and shaped, has a volumetric space that alters understanding of the object. The artist’s aim is not to create an illusionist representation but to recognize a form of illusion in a formal approach. But beyond the possible perceptual effects, his focus is on the material and its plasticity, on the physical and concrete, sensitive and poetic constitution of the work.
Stéphane La Rue favours a spare approach that emphasizes the materiality of paint in a practice that incorporates aspects of drawing and sculpture. Out of Shape No. 2 cannot be viewed solely as a painting, since it is both image and object. Its creative process is based on the properties of visual language. The materials, forms, outlines and surface lines, the colours of the unfinished wood and densely dark graphite powder, the textures, motifs and volumes – all these pictorial elements interact on an equal footing, with no hierarchy. And if the surface can be perceived in different ways, it is because this type of work, cut and shaped, has a volumetric space that alters understanding of the object. The artist’s aim is not to create an illusionist representation but to recognize a form of illusion in a formal approach. But beyond the possible perceptual effects, his focus is on the material and its plasticity, on the physical and concrete, sensitive and poetic constitution of the work.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Maclean, 2007-2010, complementary colours, formalism, ex-voto

Photo: Guy L’Heureux, courtesy Galeries Roger Bellemare et Christian Lambert, Montreal

Maclean
2007 - 2010
Oil, enamel, oil stick, grommets, nylon rope and acrylic on polyethylene tarp
205 x 158 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


The sky, the stars and the environment are recurring motifs in the art of Maclean, who maps heavenly and earthly objects using a wide range of commonplace materials. Plastic tarps, moving blankets, aluminum panels and newsprint are just some of the surfaces he uses to open and explore new spaces. In Prayer for Athabasca, juxtaposed angular fragments of tarpaulin in complementary colours create different planes and the illusion of depth. Metal grommets outline two neighbouring constellations, Eridanus (named for a river in Greek mythology) and Fornax, transforming the surface into a section of the sky and giving the composition the appearance of a celestial landscape. While the artist’s highly formalist approach transports us into outer space, the work’s title calls us back to environmental concerns. Athabasca is the name of an Alberta river that flows through a region of vast tar sand deposits and is now one of the most polluted in the country. In this sense, the work is an ex-voto, a prayer for all the living beings of an ecosystem ravaged by the extraction of crude bitumen.
The sky, the stars and the environment are recurring motifs in the art of Maclean, who maps heavenly and earthly objects using a wide range of commonplace materials. Plastic tarps, moving blankets, aluminum panels and newsprint are just some of the surfaces he uses to open and explore new spaces. In Prayer for Athabasca, juxtaposed angular fragments of tarpaulin in complementary colours create different planes and the illusion of depth. Metal grommets outline two neighbouring constellations, Eridanus (named for a river in Greek mythology) and Fornax, transforming the surface into a section of the sky and giving the composition the appearance of a celestial landscape. While the artist’s highly formalist approach transports us into outer space, the work’s title calls us back to environmental concerns. Athabasca is the name of an Alberta river that flows through a region of vast tar sand deposits and is now one of the most polluted in the country. In this sense, the work is an ex-voto, a prayer for all the living beings of an ecosystem ravaged by the extraction of crude bitumen.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Work of Wil Murray, 2011, three-dimensional collage, composition

Photo: Joe Dilworth, courtesy p|m gallery, Toronto, and Vitrine Gallery, London

Wil Murray
2011
Acrylic, photography and found images on board
175 x 114 x 18 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Much of Wil Murray’s painting is sculptural and modular. His works abound with wildly diverse forms, textures and materials in compositions whose exuberance and excess have earned them the term “maximalist.” To construct his signature bright-coloured patches and surprising shapes, he assembles disparate elements picked from among the objects amassed in his studio over the years. The resulting works are three-dimensional collages, in which even the support becomes a component of the composition, created as much outside as inside the nominal frame. In the case of NO CASH DEP. REQD. D/L ONLY, the pictorial surface has been swept clean of its elements – a heap of paint skins, shreds of cloth, bits of paper and found images – which have landed just below, as if deserting the canvas to reveal an almost monochrome plane. Playing on oppositions, the artist highlights the compositional process in painting and deconstructs it here.
Much of Wil Murray’s painting is sculptural and modular. His works abound with wildly diverse forms, textures and materials in compositions whose exuberance and excess have earned them the term “maximalist.” To construct his signature bright-coloured patches and surprising shapes, he assembles disparate elements picked from among the objects amassed in his studio over the years. The resulting works are three-dimensional collages, in which even the support becomes a component of the composition, created as much outside as inside the nominal frame. In the case of NO CASH DEP. REQD. D/L ONLY, the pictorial surface has been swept clean of its elements – a heap of paint skins, shreds of cloth, bits of paper and found images – which have landed just below, as if deserting the canvas to reveal an almost monochrome plane. Playing on oppositions, the artist highlights the compositional process in painting and deconstructs it here.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Painting of Team Macho, collective, popular iconography, drawing, 2010

Photo: Team Macho, courtesy Narwhal Projects, Toronto

Team Macho
2010
Oil on wood panel
28 x 35,5 cm
© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.


Team Macho’s art is irreverent, sometimes absurd, often parodic and always surprising. Drawing on popular iconography, the four members of the collective produce illustrations, paintings and collages whose fragmented storylines and incongruous juxtapositions are the result of subverting each other’s contributions. While some members work with traditional mediums, like oil and watercolour, others opt for drawing, airbrushing or collaging with commonplace materials. Making art as a group can mean striving for a single voice or signature, but Team Macho’s eclectic approach precludes any attempt at a unified style. One of the group’s strengths is the rejection of individual authorship. A cooperative yet highly competitive spirit prevails in the vast studio they share. Their working process – challenging each other’s ideas, swapping perspectives, pooling skills – feeds their drive to explore and experiment.
Team Macho’s art is irreverent, sometimes absurd, often parodic and always surprising. Drawing on popular iconography, the four members of the collective produce illustrations, paintings and collages whose fragmented storylines and incongruous juxtapositions are the result of subverting each other’s contributions. While some members work with traditional mediums, like oil and watercolour, others opt for drawing, airbrushing or collaging with commonplace materials. Making art as a group can mean striving for a single voice or signature, but Team Macho’s eclectic approach precludes any attempt at a unified style. One of the group’s strengths is the rejection of individual authorship. A cooperative yet highly competitive spirit prevails in the vast studio they share. Their working process – challenging each other’s ideas, swapping perspectives, pooling skills – feeds their drive to explore and experiment.

© 2013, Galerie de l'UQAM. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

Appreciate works of art
Learn and use vocabulary appropriate to contemporary art

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