Every generation of artists sees the world with different eyes, and struggles to find new ways of depicting what has been portrayed before including landscape.

In doing so, artists may search consciously for a distinctive style that is in direct opposition to that of an official "school," working out a visual vocabulary and grammar that are theirs or their generation’s alone.

Others, guided by an original vision of the world or an idiosyncratic philosophy of art itself, experiment and innovate to find their own artistic path through landscape.
Every generation of artists sees the world with different eyes, and struggles to find new ways of depicting what has been portrayed before including landscape.

In doing so, artists may search consciously for a distinctive style that is in direct opposition to that of an official "school," working out a visual vocabulary and grammar that are theirs or their generation’s alone.

Others, guided by an original vision of the world or an idiosyncratic philosophy of art itself, experiment and innovate to find their own artistic path through landscape.

© CHIN 2001. All Rights Reserved

Le Petit Avion

Le Petit Avion

Alfred Pellan (1906 - 1988)
Collection of The Winnipeg Art Gallery; Acquired with the assistance of The Winnipeg Foundation and the Canada Council
1945
CANADA
oil and sand on canvas
© The Winnipeg Art Gallery


After returning from studying art in France in the 1940s, Alfred Pellan was the first artist to introduce Surrealist ideas to Canadian painting. The Surrealists believed that true creativity emerged from the subconscious and the untrained minds of children. In this scene of two figures watching an airplane glide over a flat landscape, Pellan uses the simplified fantastical shapes and bright concentrated colours suggestive of children’s drawings. He was interested in reflecting his surroundings, not as his eye saw them but rather as his subconscious mind experienced them.
After returning from studying art in France in the 1940s, Alfred Pellan was the first artist to introduce Surrealist ideas to Canadian painting. The Surrealists believed that true creativity emerged from the subconscious and the untrained minds of children. In this scene of two figures watching an airplane glide over a flat landscape, Pellan uses the simplified fantastical shapes and bright concentrated colours suggestive of children’s drawings. He was interested in reflecting his surroundings, not as his eye saw them but rather as his subconscious mind experienced them.

© CHIN 2001. All Rights Reserved

Rose Lake

Rose Lake

Diane Whitehouse (1939 - )
Collection of The Winnipeg Art Gallery; Acquired with funds from the Volunteer Committee to The Winnipeg Art Gallery and with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance program
1996
CANADA
acrylic and collage on canvas
© The Winnipeg Art Gallery


Based on bodies of water in Alberta and Africa, the unfinished images of Rose Lake invite viewers to create their own responses to the landscape. Thick paint and twigs affixed to the surface reinforce the tangible nature of the environment. For Diane Whitehouse a painting should be a personal experience for artist and viewer. She states, “[F]or me painting has to be attached to something in the world. It’s not painting for its own sake. It’s attached to how I think and who I think I am, and how I interact with the world I live in.”
Based on bodies of water in Alberta and Africa, the unfinished images of Rose Lake invite viewers to create their own responses to the landscape. Thick paint and twigs affixed to the surface reinforce the tangible nature of the environment. For Diane Whitehouse a painting should be a personal experience for artist and viewer. She states, “[F]or me painting has to be attached to something in the world. It’s not painting for its own sake. It’s attached to how I think and who I think I am, and how I interact with the world I live in.”

© CHIN 2001. All Rights Reserved

Vallée

Vallée

Jean-Paul Riopelle (1923 - )
Collection of The Winnipeg Art Gallery; Acquired with funds from the Volunteer Committee to The Winnipeg Art Gallery
1949 - 1950
CANADA
oil on canvas
© The Winnipeg Art Gallery


Jean-Paul Riopelle’s belief in individualism and the significance of nature is reflected in his highly personal interpretation of landscape. With a free painting style full of loose, colourful brushstrokes, he defies literal representation. Instead, this active painting suggests a subconscious recognition of the environment. As a result, Vallée explodes from a direct, intuitive response to the world and represents the freedom that is possible in that experience. Riopelle said: “For me, the only reference is nature. Freedom doesn't exist except in nature.”
Jean-Paul Riopelle’s belief in individualism and the significance of nature is reflected in his highly personal interpretation of landscape. With a free painting style full of loose, colourful brushstrokes, he defies literal representation. Instead, this active painting suggests a subconscious recognition of the environment. As a result, Vallée explodes from a direct, intuitive response to the world and represents the freedom that is possible in that experience. Riopelle said: “For me, the only reference is nature. Freedom doesn't exist except in nature.”

© CHIN 2001. All Rights Reserved

Soft Couch with Bushes and Streamers

Soft Couch with Bushes and Streamers

Gathie Falk (1928 - )
Collection of The Winnipeg Art Gallery; Acquired with funds from The Winnipeg Foundation
1986
CANADA
oil on canvas
© The Winnipeg Art Gallery


For centuries landscape designers have been interested in connecting house with garden. Playing with notions of interior and exterior, artist Gathie Falk brings the outdoors in with her highly personal vision of a landscaped living room. For Falk, trees and bushes invoke “a powerful effect.” More than mere houseplants, the shrubs grow out of the floor, representing the very structure of the house. They remind us that nature creates architecture as much as culture does. Furthermore, they mark our continuing desire to sustain elements of the landscape within our modern urban environments.
For centuries landscape designers have been interested in connecting house with garden. Playing with notions of interior and exterior, artist Gathie Falk brings the outdoors in with her highly personal vision of a landscaped living room. For Falk, trees and bushes invoke “a powerful effect.” More than mere houseplants, the shrubs grow out of the floor, representing the very structure of the house. They remind us that nature creates architecture as much as culture does. Furthermore, they mark our continuing desire to sustain elements of the landscape within our modern urban environments.

© CHIN 2001. All Rights Reserved

Tree Movement

Tree Movement

Emily Carr (1871 - 1945)
Collection of The Winnipeg Art Gallery
Date ?
CANADA
gouache and oil on paper on masonite
61.00 X 92.10 cm
© The Winnipeg Art Gallery


Emily Carr felt strongly connected to the magnificent natural environment of Canada's West Coast and sought spiritual enlightenment in the landscape in the act of painting. Carr often used paints thinned with gasoline so she could work quickly to capture nature's movements, energies and mystical power. Her large brushstrokes and brilliant colours relayed her profound spiritual responses to British Columbia’s monumental trees, sea and sky.
Emily Carr felt strongly connected to the magnificent natural environment of Canada's West Coast and sought spiritual enlightenment in the landscape in the act of painting. Carr often used paints thinned with gasoline so she could work quickly to capture nature's movements, energies and mystical power. Her large brushstrokes and brilliant colours relayed her profound spiritual responses to British Columbia’s monumental trees, sea and sky.

© CHIN 2001. All Rights Reserved

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Be conscious of the emotional impact that is caused and shaped by a work of art
  • Be aware of the changes in styles in landscape art over time
  • Describe how landscape artists have found unique ways to portray the world around them, using examples
  • Compare and contrast the styles, and innovation of styles, in landscape art among the three North American countries

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