Sainte-Madeleine

Painting by Antoine-Sébastien Falardeau (1822-1889).

Antoine-Sébastien FALARDEAU
Photo: Alain Comtois
c. 1890
oil on canvas
73.5 X 60 cm
© Maison Saint-Gabriel.


Antoine-Sébastien Falardeau (1822-1889)

Antoine-Sébastien Falardeau was born on August 13, 1822 in Petit-Bois-de-l’Ail (near Cap-Santé, Quebec) and died in Italy on July 14, 1889. The son of a farmer, he left home at a very young age to pursue his ambition of becoming a painter. Upon arriving in Quebec City, he was encouraged by the painter Théophile Hamel, as well as by Gérôme Fassio, who taught him miniatures in 1845 and probably a little Italian too. He worked in the shop of sign painter R.C. Todd, from the time he was 16 years old.

After a brief stay in Montreal, he left for Italy via New York City on November 16, 1846. He studied in Florence with G. Galendi and T.Gazzarni. Around 1850, he toured Italy and earned a reputation for reproducing the old masters. He also exhibited in Quebec City and Montreal in 1862, with little success. In 1882, the provincial government commissioned him to paint a portrait of former premier Joseph-Adolphe Chapleau. He was recognized as a painter, portrait artist and reproduction painter.

His biographer and relative, Émile Read More
Antoine-Sébastien Falardeau (1822-1889)

Antoine-Sébastien Falardeau was born on August 13, 1822 in Petit-Bois-de-l’Ail (near Cap-Santé, Quebec) and died in Italy on July 14, 1889. The son of a farmer, he left home at a very young age to pursue his ambition of becoming a painter. Upon arriving in Quebec City, he was encouraged by the painter Théophile Hamel, as well as by Gérôme Fassio, who taught him miniatures in 1845 and probably a little Italian too. He worked in the shop of sign painter R.C. Todd, from the time he was 16 years old.

After a brief stay in Montreal, he left for Italy via New York City on November 16, 1846. He studied in Florence with G. Galendi and T.Gazzarni. Around 1850, he toured Italy and earned a reputation for reproducing the old masters. He also exhibited in Quebec City and Montreal in 1862, with little success. In 1882, the provincial government commissioned him to paint a portrait of former premier Joseph-Adolphe Chapleau. He was recognized as a painter, portrait artist and reproduction painter.

His biographer and relative, Émile Falardeau, estimates that he produced 300 original works. About 20 Falardeau canvases can be seen at the Musée du Québec, Musée du Séminaire de Québec and the National Gallery of Canada.

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Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that art can influence and reflect culture by conveying social and ethical issues
  • Be aware that the creative process is influenced by personal experience.
  • Understand that our reaction to art is based on our own experiences
  • Be aware of the diversity of Francophone art across Canada
  • Develop an appreciation of historical and contemporary Francophone art in Canada
  • Recognize the role of the curator in choosing, researching and interpreting art for exhibition

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