"La Chasse-galerie"

Painting by Rachel Bourque (1895-1985).

Rachel BOURQUE
Photo: Donald Savoie
Oil on canvas
Oil on canvas
55 x 44 cm
© Musée acadien de l'Université de Moncton.


Rachel Bourque (1895-1985)

Rachel Bourque was born in Ottawa in 1895. After studying nursing in New York City, she travelled to Tracadie, New Brunswick where she married the future Dr. Edgar G. Bourque. A short time later, she settled in Quebec where she became director of the Applied Social Health Department at Université de Montréal. In 1933, she returned to Acadia, this time to Shediac, New Brunswick.

Rachel Bourque took painting courses at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick and Université de Moncton, also in New Brunswick. Her paintings of religious (saints), folklore (Chasse-galerie), nautical (light houses) and animal (dogs) themes were often inspired by photographs.

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This painting depicts the legend of Chasse-Galerie, very widespread in Canada and France. The term "Chasse-Galerie" is defined as "a group of people arriving noisily and unexpectedly."1 However, the tales feature witches or even the Devil himself, who carry people off. After sayin Read More
Rachel Bourque (1895-1985)

Rachel Bourque was born in Ottawa in 1895. After studying nursing in New York City, she travelled to Tracadie, New Brunswick where she married the future Dr. Edgar G. Bourque. A short time later, she settled in Quebec where she became director of the Applied Social Health Department at Université de Montréal. In 1933, she returned to Acadia, this time to Shediac, New Brunswick.

Rachel Bourque took painting courses at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick and Université de Moncton, also in New Brunswick. Her paintings of religious (saints), folklore (Chasse-galerie), nautical (light houses) and animal (dogs) themes were often inspired by photographs.

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This painting depicts the legend of Chasse-Galerie, very widespread in Canada and France. The term "Chasse-Galerie" is defined as "a group of people arriving noisily and unexpectedly."1 However, the tales feature witches or even the Devil himself, who carry people off. After saying a few magic words and making special gestures, passengers in any vessel (a boat, a plank, a tub, a rug, a hat, a cow, etc.) are propelled at high speed over the heads of the frightened witnesses. But a word of caution: a passenger cannot carry any blessed objects or even come close to a church, or the vessel will overturn and plummet to earth. Witnesses often speak of noises in the air (voices, songs, barking dogs, whistling, etc.) or a trail of mysterious sparks - two sure signs that a Chasse-Galerie is passing by. The tales commonly include passengers picking flowers, which they bring away as proof of their voyage.
1. Catherine JOLICOEUR. Les plus belles légendes acadiennes. Montréal-Paris: Éditions internationales Alain Stanké Ltée, 1981. p. 17.
© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

"Le village de Maria Chapdelaine"

Painting by Léo B. LeBlanc (1914-1986).

Léo B. LEBLANC
Photo: Léo Blanchard
1969
Oil on canvas
50,8 x 71,1 cm
© Galerie d'art de l'Université de Moncton .


Léo B. LeBlanc (1914-1986)

Léo B. LeBlanc was born in Moncton, New Brunswick in 1914. He devoted most of his life to work on the farm, raising poultry and cattle in Notre-Dame in Kent County. It was only around 1965, after watching an artist paint on television, that he decided to start painting.

Described by many as a "naïf" painter, Léo B. LeBlanc had a prolific although very short career, producing some 350 paintings. His works depict daily life, the scenes and people around him. He reproduced his memories in paint to preserve Acadian scenes that otherwise would have been lost to time.

His 76-page handmade book Au pays de Cocagne won the National Artists’ Book Competition of Canada in 1984. It was subsequently purchased by the National Library of Canada, which classified it a rare book. Léo B. LeBlanc won other awards such as Back to the Country (1984) from the Art and Photography exhibit at the Atlantic Winter Fair.

Léo B. LeBlanc died on May 14, 1986, but left future generations a legacy of lasting memories of Acadia of days past.

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Léo B. LeBlanc (1914-1986)

Léo B. LeBlanc was born in Moncton, New Brunswick in 1914. He devoted most of his life to work on the farm, raising poultry and cattle in Notre-Dame in Kent County. It was only around 1965, after watching an artist paint on television, that he decided to start painting.

Described by many as a "naïf" painter, Léo B. LeBlanc had a prolific although very short career, producing some 350 paintings. His works depict daily life, the scenes and people around him. He reproduced his memories in paint to preserve Acadian scenes that otherwise would have been lost to time.

His 76-page handmade book Au pays de Cocagne won the National Artists’ Book Competition of Canada in 1984. It was subsequently purchased by the National Library of Canada, which classified it a rare book. Léo B. LeBlanc won other awards such as Back to the Country (1984) from the Art and Photography exhibit at the Atlantic Winter Fair.

Léo B. LeBlanc died on May 14, 1986, but left future generations a legacy of lasting memories of Acadia of days past.

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Just as folklorists have strived to preserve customs or the lifestyle of various peoples, especially by recording songs, nursery rhymes or tales, Léo LeBlanc has visualized Acadian customs in his paintings. On his canvas, we recognize Maria, a small Quebec town near the New Brunswick border, as it existed when the artist was a regular visitor. A photograph may be a document, but Léo LeBlanc has breathed life into that document. Each element is genuine, each house, each window, each figure, each animal exists in his memory and has its own very specific history. LeBlanc was a "naïf" painter because he handled the paintbrush like a child, but his imagination has preserved scenes that otherwise would have been forgotten.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

"Vue de Saint-Boniface à partir de la rue Langevin"

Painting by Pauline Morier.

Pauline MORIER
Photo: Pierrette Boily
1965
Oil on canvas
123 x 68,8 cm
© Musée de Saint-Boniface.


Pauline Morier

Born in Saint-Boniface, Manitoba, Pauline Morier studied at the University of Manitoba where she earned a B.A. in plastic arts. She spent some time in France and upon returning settled in Montreal. She is presently a member of the SKOL Centre of Present-Day Art and is part of the teams which produce the reviews called ESSE (arts and opinions) and Espace.

Between 1975 and 1995 her works were shown in a number of exhibitions. In 1992, she organized the exhibition called L’art en vitrine. From 1978 to 1980 she hosted La chronique des arts visuels on Radio Centre-ville in Montreal. In 1988, she participated in a program called Portraits d’artistes produced by Roger Léveillé. Her works are found in the Martineau Walker collection, the Canadian Art Bank, the Centre culturel franco-manitobain and the Musée de Saint-Boniface.

The works of Pauline Morier have been reproduced in Prairie Fire, a Manitoba literary review. In 1987, she published "Érotisme et mort" [Eroticism and Death] in the Cahiers des arts visuels au Québec. In the spring of 1987, "Polarisation, expositions/per Read More
Pauline Morier

Born in Saint-Boniface, Manitoba, Pauline Morier studied at the University of Manitoba where she earned a B.A. in plastic arts. She spent some time in France and upon returning settled in Montreal. She is presently a member of the SKOL Centre of Present-Day Art and is part of the teams which produce the reviews called ESSE (arts and opinions) and Espace.

Between 1975 and 1995 her works were shown in a number of exhibitions. In 1992, she organized the exhibition called L’art en vitrine. From 1978 to 1980 she hosted La chronique des arts visuels on Radio Centre-ville in Montreal. In 1988, she participated in a program called Portraits d’artistes produced by Roger Léveillé. Her works are found in the Martineau Walker collection, the Canadian Art Bank, the Centre culturel franco-manitobain and the Musée de Saint-Boniface.

The works of Pauline Morier have been reproduced in Prairie Fire, a Manitoba literary review. In 1987, she published "Érotisme et mort" [Eroticism and Death] in the Cahiers des arts visuels au Québec. In the spring of 1987, "Polarisation, expositions/performance" was published in the student magazine of l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM).

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Inspired by his surroundings, the artists paints his native city seen from his home on Langevin Street in the heart of French-speaking Saint-Boniface. The quiet of the garden in the back yard contrasts with the intensity of the houses and the institutions of urban life. Painted in 1965, the work shows a different Saint-Boniface from the one we know today. The Saint-Boniface Cathedral, which burned down in 1968, is a contemporary building that rose from the stone ruins of the old cathedral. The Taché Hospice, with its silver dome. was demolished in 1973 to make room for a more modern building. Evolution is evident not only in the city of Saint-Boniface but also in the artist, who ultimately adopted a surrealistic style very different from that in this painting.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that art can influence and reflect culture by conveying social and ethical issues
  • Be aware that the creative process is influenced by personal experience.
  • Understand that our reaction to art is based on our own experiences
  • Be aware of the diversity of Francophone art across Canada
  • Develop an appreciation of historical and contemporary Francophone art in Canada
  • Recognize the role of the curator in choosing, researching and interpreting art for exhibition

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