"Corps et graphies"

Painting by Francine Simonin (1936).

Francine SIMONIN
Photo: Ginette Clément
Gift by the artist,
1994
Ink on paper
220 x 124 cm
© Musée d'art de Joliette.


Francine Simonin (1936)

Born in Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1936, Francine Simonin has lived and worked in Quebec since 1968, while continuing to travel between France, California, Quebec and Switzerland, where she is represented by respected galleries. Through her preferred media, painting, drawing and engraving, she works on a series of themes almost always inspired by the female body and its movement. This international artist has taken part in about a hundred group exhibitions, biennials and thirty or so individual exhibitions. She has obtained a steady stream of grants and awards since 1964 to support an intense production while she continues to teach at the university level.

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An unavoidable play on words relating to the subject of the virtual exhibition, the title links writing to evocation of the gestural magic of professional dance. This enormous ideogram also suggests the theatre in which it is performed: the physical exercise of the art of calligraphy. In this era of interdisciplinary artis Read More
Francine Simonin (1936)

Born in Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1936, Francine Simonin has lived and worked in Quebec since 1968, while continuing to travel between France, California, Quebec and Switzerland, where she is represented by respected galleries. Through her preferred media, painting, drawing and engraving, she works on a series of themes almost always inspired by the female body and its movement. This international artist has taken part in about a hundred group exhibitions, biennials and thirty or so individual exhibitions. She has obtained a steady stream of grants and awards since 1964 to support an intense production while she continues to teach at the university level.

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An unavoidable play on words relating to the subject of the virtual exhibition, the title links writing to evocation of the gestural magic of professional dance. This enormous ideogram also suggests the theatre in which it is performed: the physical exercise of the art of calligraphy. In this era of interdisciplinary artistic practices, this huge corporeal "B" reflects the development of the living arts in the 1990s while bringing us back to the text through its almost closed forms. The eye remains subjugated by the conspiracy of the scale of the letter to the body and the magnitude of the execution.

Denyse Roy, Curator, Musée d’art de Joliette

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Untitled

Painting by Edmund Alleyn (1931).

Edmund ALLEYN
Photo: Claude Lamarche
1953
Graphite
49.5 X 39.5 cm
© La Pulperie de Chicoutimi.


Edmund Alleyn (1931)

Born in Quebec City in 1931, Edmund Alleyn now lives and works in Montreal. After attending the École des beaux-arts in Quebec City, he won the Grand Prix aux Concours artistiques de la province de Québec and a grant from the Royal Society in 1955. He lived in France from 1955 to 1970.

His work, which moves in turn from lyrical abstraction to narrative realism and pop art, spans several decades. Beyond the formal media used, his work conveys the same thought, the same observations and the same vision of the world. The appearance of things, the passage of time, and our own passage, are always challenged in his work.

In 1958 and 1960, Edmund Alleyn was included in the selection of Canadian paintings featured in the Guggenheim competition, and in 1959, he won the bronze medal at the Sao Paulo Biennial. He represented Canada in the Venice Biennial in 1960. Since 1952, he has produced many solo exhibitions and has participated in about ten group events, both in Canada and abroad.

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Edmund Alleyn (1931)

Born in Quebec City in 1931, Edmund Alleyn now lives and works in Montreal. After attending the École des beaux-arts in Quebec City, he won the Grand Prix aux Concours artistiques de la province de Québec and a grant from the Royal Society in 1955. He lived in France from 1955 to 1970.

His work, which moves in turn from lyrical abstraction to narrative realism and pop art, spans several decades. Beyond the formal media used, his work conveys the same thought, the same observations and the same vision of the world. The appearance of things, the passage of time, and our own passage, are always challenged in his work.

In 1958 and 1960, Edmund Alleyn was included in the selection of Canadian paintings featured in the Guggenheim competition, and in 1959, he won the bronze medal at the Sao Paulo Biennial. He represented Canada in the Venice Biennial in 1960. Since 1952, he has produced many solo exhibitions and has participated in about ten group events, both in Canada and abroad.

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Although abstract in appearance, early paintings by Edmund Alleyn (1955-64) often represent a landscape, capable of visually reconstituting the setting of an internal experience. A return to figurative work in 1964 paradoxically featured increased abstraction. The refined landscapes become shells in which only the formal elements and the impression of a missed encounter remain.

He also approached this dispossession of the natural state in his techno-logical period, which began in 1965. In the 1970s, the realism of people and the verism of some of his installations form part of a period when the democratization of art was viewed as a necessity by many artists from Canada and Europe.

His most recent paintings are stage scenes without actors. The general impression conveys a state of timeless exile. The objects that inhabit his canvasses are only what they appear to be: their future is identical to their past. Only we are passing through and will soon disappear.

Various Sources

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Contorsion

Painting by Pierre-Roland Dinel (1919).

Pierre-Roland DINEL
Photo: Clément & Mongeau, Gift of Maurice Forget,
1958
Wood
113,5 x 24 x 22 cm
© Musée d'art de Joliette.


Pierre-Roland Dinel (1919)

Pierre-Roland Dinel was born in Montreal in 1919 and now lives in Saint-Roch-de-l’Achigan, where he still works. Studies in industrial arts did not distract him from his passion for sculpture. He has been very involved in the emergence of modern sculpture in Quebec, helping to establish the main organizations supporting sculpture and teaching at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières for several decades. He has taken part in solo and group exhibitions since 1958, in Quebec, France, the United States and Czechoslovakia. He is open to all methods for disseminating his art and willingly cooperates on private projects. He designs masks for a folklore company and contributes to subsidized organized activities in sculpture throughout Quebec. He has obtained many grants and his work is present in numerous private and public collections in Canada and abroad.

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On the boundaries of abstraction, this female figure holds the viewer’s eye specifically by maintaining dou Read More
Pierre-Roland Dinel (1919)

Pierre-Roland Dinel was born in Montreal in 1919 and now lives in Saint-Roch-de-l’Achigan, where he still works. Studies in industrial arts did not distract him from his passion for sculpture. He has been very involved in the emergence of modern sculpture in Quebec, helping to establish the main organizations supporting sculpture and teaching at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières for several decades. He has taken part in solo and group exhibitions since 1958, in Quebec, France, the United States and Czechoslovakia. He is open to all methods for disseminating his art and willingly cooperates on private projects. He designs masks for a folklore company and contributes to subsidized organized activities in sculpture throughout Quebec. He has obtained many grants and his work is present in numerous private and public collections in Canada and abroad.

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On the boundaries of abstraction, this female figure holds the viewer’s eye specifically by maintaining doubt. Do we actually see bones, hips, a breast and a rounded arm? Sculpted in 1958, Contorsion dates from the driftwood period, anticipating that of the psychedelic lava lamps. The term contorsion can also apply to the link between the concept of mobility and the sculptor’s gestures that transformed this fibrous material into a fluid mass. The artist has even worked with the natural veining of the wood to achieve a graphic enrichment of his work and integrate the "gestures" of natural growth.

Denyse Roy, Curator, Musée d’art de Joliette

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that art can influence and reflect culture by conveying social and ethical issues
  • Be aware that the creative process is influenced by personal experience.
  • Understand that our reaction to art is based on our own experiences
  • Be aware of the diversity of Francophone art across Canada
  • Develop an appreciation of historical and contemporary Francophone art in Canada
  • Recognize the role of the curator in choosing, researching and interpreting art for exhibition

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