Seaside Holiday

Work by Kittie Bruneau (1929)

Photo: Claude Lamarche
1989
Oil on canvas
119 X 182 cm
© La Pulperie de Chicoutimi.


Through the bloody splashings of an high-tide sun

the ship stands still,
like a forgotten letter,
a vacant flourish,
and as a deserted sign so gloriously wrecked, the ship

anchors the beach
through a quicksand of colours
by lazy waves of heat

It rains purple and black.

Jean-Pierre Vidal
Through the bloody splashings of an high-tide sun

the ship stands still,
like a forgotten letter,
a vacant flourish,
and as a deserted sign so gloriously wrecked, the ship

anchors the beach
through a quicksand of colours
by lazy waves of heat

It rains purple and black.

Jean-Pierre Vidal

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Kittie Bruneau (1929-)

Kittie Bruneau was born in Montreal in 1929. She studied drawing and sculpture at l’École des Beaux-arts de Montréal (1946 and 1949) and spent another year painting at the Montreal School of Art. In 1950, she left Quebec for Paris where she improved her dance technique and got to know the many artistic trends of the period. Her return to Quebec and her first exhibitions coincided with the coming to power of the Liberal Party and the death of Borduas (1960).

Kittie Bruneau’s artistic path and the place she occupies in our collective memory are quite special. Her painting is lyrical, brightly coloured and vibrant. She has been influenced very little by painters like Borduas or Riopelle. The artist’s perpetual quest for identity can be discerned in her work, always concerned with the human condition.

In 1968, Kittie Bruneau earned a number of awards from the Quebec cultural affairs department and the Canada Council. Since 1956, she has contributed to more than 50 solo exhibitions and 35 group showings. She has also collaborated on a number of art books with Read More
Kittie Bruneau (1929-)

Kittie Bruneau was born in Montreal in 1929. She studied drawing and sculpture at l’École des Beaux-arts de Montréal (1946 and 1949) and spent another year painting at the Montreal School of Art. In 1950, she left Quebec for Paris where she improved her dance technique and got to know the many artistic trends of the period. Her return to Quebec and her first exhibitions coincided with the coming to power of the Liberal Party and the death of Borduas (1960).

Kittie Bruneau’s artistic path and the place she occupies in our collective memory are quite special. Her painting is lyrical, brightly coloured and vibrant. She has been influenced very little by painters like Borduas or Riopelle. The artist’s perpetual quest for identity can be discerned in her work, always concerned with the human condition.

In 1968, Kittie Bruneau earned a number of awards from the Quebec cultural affairs department and the Canada Council. Since 1956, she has contributed to more than 50 solo exhibitions and 35 group showings. She has also collaborated on a number of art books with other artists and writers.

Jean-Pierre Vidal

Born in France, Jean-Pierre Vidal studied literature in Quebec (Ph.D. Université Laval) and has been teaching literature at l’Université du Québec à Chicoutimi since its inception in 1969. He is also a researcher and a certified professor of semiology at the graduate level at l’Université du Québec à Montréal.

Besides two books on Alain Robbe-Grillet, he has published many articles in university publications (on Lautréamont, Mallarmé, Claude Simon, Vian, Perec, etc., not to mention a recent article on... Dracula in les Cahiers de l’Herne). He has also written a book of short stories (Histoires cruelles et lamentables), will soon be publishing a collection of 366 aphorisms (Intempestives) and is finishing a second collection of short stories (Petites morts), with the artist Jean-Pierre Séguin (computer graphics).

Founder and member of the editorial board of the review Protée (semiotic theories et practices), Jean-Pierre Vidal contributes regularly to Lubie, Nuit blanche and to other cultural periodicals. A faithful subject of Denys Ier de l’Anse, his most ardent wish is to receive the title of court poet.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that art can influence and reflect culture by conveying social and ethical issues
  • Be aware that the creative process is influenced by personal experience.
  • Understand that our reaction to art is based on our own experiences
  • Understand relationships between visual communication and written expression
  • Be aware that writers and artists use a range of strategies to communicate meaning
  • Be aware of the diversity of Francophone art across Canada
  • Develop an appreciation of historical and contemporary Francophone art in Canada
  • Recognize the role of the curator in choosing, researching and interpreting art for exhibition

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