On May 5, 1945, the Allied armies in North-West Europe were ordered to stop fighting as a cease-fire had been signed with the Germans. The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.) received word of the cease-fire by an "emergency" military message sent from the Headquarters of 3rd Canadian Infantry Division late in the evening of May 4, 1945. The message noted: "Cancell [sic] all offensive operations and CEASE FIRE at 0800 B 5 May 45 (.) Further details later." The war in Europe was over.

On May 5, 1945, German forces in Holland under the command of Colonel-General Johannes Blaskowitz unconditionally surrendered at Wageningen to Lieutenant-General Charles Foulkes, Commander of the 1st Canadian Corps and the senior serving member of The Royal Canadian Regiment. Foulkes signed the formal Proclamation of Surrender. The fighting had ended. The fighting in Northwest Europe had cost The Royal Canadian Regiment twelve soldiers killed and another forty-nine wounded.

From May 7 to September 2, 1945, soldiers of The Royal Canadian Regiment garrisoned the town of Ijmuiden and then Soest where the process of disarming and documenting 20,000 Germans for rep Read More
On May 5, 1945, the Allied armies in North-West Europe were ordered to stop fighting as a cease-fire had been signed with the Germans. The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.) received word of the cease-fire by an "emergency" military message sent from the Headquarters of 3rd Canadian Infantry Division late in the evening of May 4, 1945. The message noted: "Cancell [sic] all offensive operations and CEASE FIRE at 0800 B 5 May 45 (.) Further details later." The war in Europe was over.

On May 5, 1945, German forces in Holland under the command of Colonel-General Johannes Blaskowitz unconditionally surrendered at Wageningen to Lieutenant-General Charles Foulkes, Commander of the 1st Canadian Corps and the senior serving member of The Royal Canadian Regiment. Foulkes signed the formal Proclamation of Surrender. The fighting had ended. The fighting in Northwest Europe had cost The Royal Canadian Regiment twelve soldiers killed and another forty-nine wounded.

From May 7 to September 2, 1945, soldiers of The Royal Canadian Regiment garrisoned the town of Ijmuiden and then Soest where the process of disarming and documenting 20,000 Germans for repatriation was undertaken. On July 17 Lieutenant-General Foulkes relinquished command of the 1st Canadian Corps and returned to Canada, where, on August 21, he became the Chief of the General Staff. As such, he was entrusted with the duties of repatriation, demobilization, and the peacetime reconstitution of the Canadian armed forces. The fact that this outstanding officer had advanced from the rank of Captain to become a top officer in little more than six years was a matter of great pride to all members of The Royal Canadian Regiment.

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The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa were ordered to cease-fire on 5 May 1945 by this telegram.

The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa were ordered to cease-fire on 5 May 1945 by this telegram.

Ken Reynolds
1945-05-05
NETHERLANDS
© The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa Regimental Museum


Colonel-General Johannes Blaskowitz unconditionally surrendered at Wageningen

Colonel-General Johannes Blaskowitz unconditionally surrendered at Wageningen to Lieutenant-General Charles Foulkes, Commander of the 1st Canadian Corps and the senior serving member of The Regiment, who signed the formal Proclamation of Surrender.

Canadian Heritage Information Network

Wageningen, NETHERLANDS
© The Royal Canadian Regiment


This personal medallion, belonging to General Foulkes, is dated 5 May, 1945

This personal medallion, belonging to General Foulkes, is dated 5 May, 1945, and bears two significant symbols -- the swastika used by the Nazi party, and the dove of peace.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
1945-05-05
NETHERLANDS
© The Royal Canadian Regiment


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Army in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Identify key locations in which Canada’s military operated during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by Canadian soldiers

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