During the fighting in Normandy and Northwest Europe, The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.) fought mostly in support of other infantry units. As a result, they spent most of the time operating as companies or platoons. The battalion consisted of four companies, "A", "B" and "C" armed with twelve Vickers machine guns each, and "D" which was armed with sixteen 4.2" mortars. One way of identifying such small sub-units was the use of company and platoon pennants, small flags bearing the Cameron’s Scottish tartan and bearing the letter of the company or the number of the platoon. Pictured here are the pennants for No. 4 Platoon, No. 6 Platoon, No. 8 Platoon (machine gun platoons), No. 13 Platoon, No. 14 Platoon and No. 15 Platoon (mortar platoons).
During the fighting in Normandy and Northwest Europe, The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.) fought mostly in support of other infantry units. As a result, they spent most of the time operating as companies or platoons. The battalion consisted of four companies, "A", "B" and "C" armed with twelve Vickers machine guns each, and "D" which was armed with sixteen 4.2" mortars. One way of identifying such small sub-units was the use of company and platoon pennants, small flags bearing the Cameron’s Scottish tartan and bearing the letter of the company or the number of the platoon. Pictured here are the pennants for No. 4 Platoon, No. 6 Platoon, No. 8 Platoon (machine gun platoons), No. 13 Platoon, No. 14 Platoon and No. 15 Platoon (mortar platoons).

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

These six pennants were among those made for all four Cameron companies and all sixteen platoons

These six pennants were among those made for all four Cameron companies and all sixteen platoons, those pictured representing Nos. 4, 6, 8, 13, 14 and 15 Platoons.

Ken Reynolds

© The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa Regimental Museum


During the Second World War, orderly room staff used typewriters to write dispatches, memos, reports and other administrative paperwork in a clear and efficient manner. Clarity was particularly important in the messages that carried information between command headquarters and the units in the field. Outside of the military, typewriters were used by war correspondents who relayed news from the front to people at home.
During the Second World War, orderly room staff used typewriters to write dispatches, memos, reports and other administrative paperwork in a clear and efficient manner. Clarity was particularly important in the messages that carried information between command headquarters and the units in the field. Outside of the military, typewriters were used by war correspondents who relayed news from the front to people at home.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Typewriter built by Underwood Ltd. in Toronto, Ontario

Typewriter built by Underwood Ltd. in Toronto, Ontario and used by orderly room staff of the King's Own Calgary Regiment during the Italian Campaign of World War II. This typewriter was part of the 14th Canadian Armoured Regiment’s orderly room equipment that was brought from Calgary in 1941. It was used in Great Britain until 1943 when it was sent to Italy and, later, Holland. The typewriter was sent home to Calgary in 1945 at the end of the war.

The King's Own Calgary Regiment (RCAC) Museum
1941 - 1945
© The King's Own Calgary Regiment (RCAC) Museum


One of the Canadian soldiers who served with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany was Pipe-Major (Warrant Officer II) C.W. Ross, of the 3rd Battalion, The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.). Composed primarily of soldiers more recently sent to Europe and conscripts from Canada, the 3rd Battalion’s uniform can be identified by the grey stripe located beneath the grey rectangle of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division. Pipe-Major Ross’s uniform also bears a pipe-major’s insignia on the sleeve of the tunic and solid silver insignia on the tunic, the sash and the balmoral.
One of the Canadian soldiers who served with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany was Pipe-Major (Warrant Officer II) C.W. Ross, of the 3rd Battalion, The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.). Composed primarily of soldiers more recently sent to Europe and conscripts from Canada, the 3rd Battalion’s uniform can be identified by the grey stripe located beneath the grey rectangle of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division. Pipe-Major Ross’s uniform also bears a pipe-major’s insignia on the sleeve of the tunic and solid silver insignia on the tunic, the sash and the balmoral.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Tunic worn by Pipe-Major C.W. Ross

This tunic was worn by Pipe-Major C.W. Ross, of the 3rd Battalion, The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (M.G.), while on occupation duty in Germany.

Ken Reynolds

GERMANY
© The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa Regimental Museum


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Army in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Identify key locations in which Canada’s military operated during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by Canadian soldiers

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