Historically, the Canadian Army has always maintained strong ties with British royalty. In addition to sharing a common sovereign, members of the British royalty often serve as Colonels-In-Chief of various Canadian regiments. His Royal Highness Edward, Prince of Wales, was the first Colonel-In-Chief of the Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians), appointed on July 28, 1928.

He relinquished the title in 1936 when he became King Edward VIII. His younger brother, seen here inspecting the troops, became King George VI following Edward’s abdication just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War. It was at this inspection that the Lord Strathcona’s Horse changed the abbreviation of their regiment from "LSH" to "LdSH", having been informed by King George VI that "Ld" is the proper abbreviation for Lord.

On a visit to the Canadian camp at Aldershot, England, King George VI was briefed on upcoming activities by officers from The Carleton and York Regiment.

In January 1940, His Majesty the King inspected the Royal 22e Régiment. This was the first review by the Sovereign as Colonel-in-Chief of the Q Read More
Historically, the Canadian Army has always maintained strong ties with British royalty. In addition to sharing a common sovereign, members of the British royalty often serve as Colonels-In-Chief of various Canadian regiments. His Royal Highness Edward, Prince of Wales, was the first Colonel-In-Chief of the Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians), appointed on July 28, 1928.

He relinquished the title in 1936 when he became King Edward VIII. His younger brother, seen here inspecting the troops, became King George VI following Edward’s abdication just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War. It was at this inspection that the Lord Strathcona’s Horse changed the abbreviation of their regiment from "LSH" to "LdSH", having been informed by King George VI that "Ld" is the proper abbreviation for Lord.

On a visit to the Canadian camp at Aldershot, England, King George VI was briefed on upcoming activities by officers from The Carleton and York Regiment.

In January 1940, His Majesty the King inspected the Royal 22e Régiment. This was the first review by the Sovereign as Colonel-in-Chief of the Quebec-based regiment. There was high praise for the troops at this dress parade. On April 2 the regiment learned that it had been chosen to mount guard over the Buckingham and St. James Palaces from April 12 to 21. This was the first time a non-British Army unit had ever done so. This was therefore the first time that commands and instructions were given to the King’s Guard in French. The troop consisted of six officers and eighty men.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (now the Queen Mother, who has since passed away) inspecting the regiment Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) on May 24, 1942.

Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) Regimental Museum
1942-05-24
© Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) Regimental Museum


Two officers of the York Carleton

Two officers of the York Carleton Briefing the King at Aldershot England WWII.

Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum

© Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Army in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Identify key locations in which Canada’s military operated during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by Canadian soldiers

Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans