With the end of the war in Europe in mid-May 1945, many soldiers of the Royal 22e Régiment were offered two alternatives: to serve with the occupation forces in Germany or to go to Asia to fight the Japanese, who were still resisting. Many of the Van Doos chose to join the Allied forces in the Pacific. On September 1, 1945, General Tomenage, of the Japanese Naval Fusiliers, gave his personal flag to Lieutenant-Colonel Pierre Chassé, Royal 22e Régiment and member of the Special Operations Executive, at Sugni Putani in Burma when the Japanese 26th Corps surrendered to the Allies.
With the end of the war in Europe in mid-May 1945, many soldiers of the Royal 22e Régiment were offered two alternatives: to serve with the occupation forces in Germany or to go to Asia to fight the Japanese, who were still resisting. Many of the Van Doos chose to join the Allied forces in the Pacific. On September 1, 1945, General Tomenage, of the Japanese Naval Fusiliers, gave his personal flag to Lieutenant-Colonel Pierre Chassé, Royal 22e Régiment and member of the Special Operations Executive, at Sugni Putani in Burma when the Japanese 26th Corps surrendered to the Allies.

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Japanese flag in a blond wood frame

Japanese flag in a blond wood frame. Given to the LCol Pierre Chassé on 1 September 1945.

Musée du Royal 22e Régiment.
1945-09-01
© Musée du Royal 22e Régiment.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Army in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Identify key locations in which Canada’s military operated during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by Canadian soldiers

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