Boots

Boots

Royal Ontario Museum

Moose skin; Caribou hair; wool cloth; yarn
Length: 20.0 cm width: 8.5 cm Height: 24.0 cm
960.190.1.A-B
©1996 - the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto). All Rights Reserved.


CULTURAL CONTEXT : Art; crafted as artistic expression

DESCRIPTION : These children’s boots, while very ornate, would not be worn on any regular basis as the floral caribou hair tufting would not wear well. Considered as art pieces, these boots are of smoked moose hide on the bottoms with dark blue and red duffle forming the instep pieces and top of the boots. A fur piece, and dark blue and red duffle edging finish the boot tops. Attached at the back of the tops is woven wool cord. Wool yarn tassels are attached to the cord ends. The floral design is green, red, orange and pink dyed caribou hair tufts sewn into the duffle strips.

GEO-CULTURAL AREA : Central Subarctic

ETHNOLINGUISTIC GROUP : Athapaskan

CULTURE : Slavey

NATURAL REGION : Mackenzie River; Great Slave Lake

PROVINCE : Northwest Territories

PERIOD : mid 20th Century

MATERIAL : Moose skin; Caribou hair; wool cloth; yarn

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE : Sewn

DECORATIVE TECHNIQUE : Hair tufting
CULTURAL CONTEXT : Art; crafted as artistic expression

DESCRIPTION : These children’s boots, while very ornate, would not be worn on any regular basis as the floral caribou hair tufting would not wear well. Considered as art pieces, these boots are of smoked moose hide on the bottoms with dark blue and red duffle forming the instep pieces and top of the boots. A fur piece, and dark blue and red duffle edging finish the boot tops. Attached at the back of the tops is woven wool cord. Wool yarn tassels are attached to the cord ends. The floral design is green, red, orange and pink dyed caribou hair tufts sewn into the duffle strips.

GEO-CULTURAL AREA : Central Subarctic

ETHNOLINGUISTIC GROUP : Athapaskan

CULTURE : Slavey

NATURAL REGION : Mackenzie River; Great Slave Lake

PROVINCE : Northwest Territories

PERIOD : mid 20th Century

MATERIAL : Moose skin; Caribou hair; wool cloth; yarn

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE : Sewn

DECORATIVE TECHNIQUE : Hair tufting

©1996 - the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto). All Rights Reserved.

Decoy

Decoy

Royal Ontario Museum

Willow wood; string
Length: 33.0 cm Width: 9.0 cm Height: 19.0 cm
976.308.30
©1996 - the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto). All Rights Reserved.


CULTURAL CONTEXT : Art; crafted as artistic expression

DESCRIPTION : The goose decoy is made of thin willow twigs, bundled and tied together with strings. The head of the decoy is framed by splitting the bundle into two sections with one section looped for the top of the head and the other section drawn straight across, to form the bottom of the head. The two sections are joined to form a beak and the twigs are cut off at both ends to complete the decoy.

GEO-CULTURAL AREA : Eastern Subarctic

ETHNOLINGUISTIC GROUP : Algonquian

CULTURE : Swampy Cree

NATURAL REGION : James Bay; Moose River

PROVINCE : Ontario

PERIOD : 3rd quarter 20th Century

MATERIAL : Willow wood; string

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE : Bundled
CULTURAL CONTEXT : Art; crafted as artistic expression

DESCRIPTION : The goose decoy is made of thin willow twigs, bundled and tied together with strings. The head of the decoy is framed by splitting the bundle into two sections with one section looped for the top of the head and the other section drawn straight across, to form the bottom of the head. The two sections are joined to form a beak and the twigs are cut off at both ends to complete the decoy.

GEO-CULTURAL AREA : Eastern Subarctic

ETHNOLINGUISTIC GROUP : Algonquian

CULTURE : Swampy Cree

NATURAL REGION : James Bay; Moose River

PROVINCE : Ontario

PERIOD : 3rd quarter 20th Century

MATERIAL : Willow wood; string

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE : Bundled

©1996 - the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto), All Rights Reserved.

Bitten bark Pattern

Bitten Bark Pattern

Royal Ontario Museum

Birchbark
Length : 16.0 cm Width : 16.0 cm
980.291.10
©1996 - the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto). All Rights Reserved.


CULTURAL CONTEXT : Art; crafted as artistic expression; bitten-bark patterns may have been used as patterns for embroidery designs, but are now produced as two-dimensional art.

DESCRIPTION : The paper thin almost transparent birchbark sheet has been imprinted with a floral design. The folds in the bark are still evident. Close examination of the bark sheet reveals some shading owing to the strength of the bite of the eyeteeth needed to produce the design on the folded bark.

GEO-CULTURAL AREA : Central Subarctic

ETHNOLINGUISTIC GROUP : Algonquian

CULTURE : Western Woods Cree

NATURAL REGION : Amisk Lake

PROVINCE : Saskatchewan

PERIOD : 4th quarter, 20th Century

MATERIAL : Birchbark

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE : Design biting
CULTURAL CONTEXT : Art; crafted as artistic expression; bitten-bark patterns may have been used as patterns for embroidery designs, but are now produced as two-dimensional art.

DESCRIPTION : The paper thin almost transparent birchbark sheet has been imprinted with a floral design. The folds in the bark are still evident. Close examination of the bark sheet reveals some shading owing to the strength of the bite of the eyeteeth needed to produce the design on the folded bark.

GEO-CULTURAL AREA : Central Subarctic

ETHNOLINGUISTIC GROUP : Algonquian

CULTURE : Western Woods Cree

NATURAL REGION : Amisk Lake

PROVINCE : Saskatchewan

PERIOD : 4th quarter, 20th Century

MATERIAL : Birchbark

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE : Design biting

©1996 - the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto). All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Identify some traditional and contemporary materials and manufacture methods utilized by Canadian Subarctic peoples
  • Identify some objects made by Canadian Subarctic peoples using a combination of traditional and contemporary materials and their uses
  • Describe how contemporary materials have influenced the objects made by Canadian Subarctic peoples

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