This event is designed to promote the concept of Costa Rica as a multicultural and multilingual country. It achieves this through incorporating different forms of artistic and cultural expression which can be shared by different communities, each from their own perspective and their particular share in the identity, history and everyday life of the peoples of which the Costa Rican nation is comprised.

This festival has been sponsored by the Costa Rican Centre of Science and Culture, home of the Children’s Museum since 1995.

OBJECTIVES

To encourage the participation of boys and girls in the event through an active exchange of cultural experiences and expression among those attending.

To showcase the specific cultural identity and artistic expression of each of the different communities which make up the varied mosaic of modern Costa Rica, through their forms of cultural expression.

To create a space for sharing and exchange among the various groups through traditional recreational activities.
This event is designed to promote the concept of Costa Rica as a multicultural and multilingual country. It achieves this through incorporating different forms of artistic and cultural expression which can be shared by different communities, each from their own perspective and their particular share in the identity, history and everyday life of the peoples of which the Costa Rican nation is comprised.

This festival has been sponsored by the Costa Rican Centre of Science and Culture, home of the Children’s Museum since 1995.

OBJECTIVES

To encourage the participation of boys and girls in the event through an active exchange of cultural experiences and expression among those attending.

To showcase the specific cultural identity and artistic expression of each of the different communities which make up the varied mosaic of modern Costa Rica, through their forms of cultural expression.

To create a space for sharing and exchange among the various groups through traditional recreational activities.

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Clay artifacts

Children from San Vicente de Nicoya teaching others how to make clay artifacts using traditional methods, making replicas of pre-Columbian and folk pottery.

Museo de los Niños

© Museo de los Niños, Costa Rica


Children teach other children their community’s handicraft techniques and skills in an open, flexible, hands-on approach. They use the typical materials of their respective regions to craft objects and demonstrate the processes by which the materials are prepared. To complement the activities of the children from the different communities, there is an exhibition of finished handicrafts and of tools used to create them. The exhibition illustrates, through photos, maps and information, the characteristics of each zone of origin and can be used by children as a pedagogical aid to explain the handicraft processes.

Participating communities to date include San Vicente de Nicoya and Quitirrisí de Mora.
Children teach other children their community’s handicraft techniques and skills in an open, flexible, hands-on approach. They use the typical materials of their respective regions to craft objects and demonstrate the processes by which the materials are prepared. To complement the activities of the children from the different communities, there is an exhibition of finished handicrafts and of tools used to create them. The exhibition illustrates, through photos, maps and information, the characteristics of each zone of origin and can be used by children as a pedagogical aid to explain the handicraft processes.

Participating communities to date include San Vicente de Nicoya and Quitirrisí de Mora.

© 1999, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Basket weaving

Making handicrafts out of vegetable fibres is one of the occupational activities of the Hüetar indigenous group in the community of Quitirrisí de Mora.

Museo de los Niños

© Museo de los Niños, Costa Rica


Making handicrafts out of vegetable fibres is one of the occupational activities of the Hüetar indigenous group in the community of Quitirrisí de Mora. This group makes baskets, mats, stands for cooking pots, drinking vessels, hats and a wide variety of other articles for decorative and home use. Children learn at home to weave and intertwine the vegetable fibres and to colour with natural and artificial dyes the handicrafts which are primarily intended for sale to national and foreign tourists. This activity constitutes an important point of reference for cultural identity and keeps the tradition alive from one generation to the next.
Making handicrafts out of vegetable fibres is one of the occupational activities of the Hüetar indigenous group in the community of Quitirrisí de Mora. This group makes baskets, mats, stands for cooking pots, drinking vessels, hats and a wide variety of other articles for decorative and home use. Children learn at home to weave and intertwine the vegetable fibres and to colour with natural and artificial dyes the handicrafts which are primarily intended for sale to national and foreign tourists. This activity constitutes an important point of reference for cultural identity and keeps the tradition alive from one generation to the next.

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Pottery

Replicas of pre-Columbian artifacts using clay from the community of San Vicente de Nicoya belong to a range of pottery crafts of Chorotega indigenous origin mainly from the Guanacaste area in the north of Costa Rica.

Museo de los Niños

© Museo de los Niños, Costa Rica


Replicas of pre-Columbian artifacts using clay from the community of San Vicente de Nicoya belong to a range of pottery crafts of Chorotega indigenous origin mainly from the Guanacaste area in the north of Costa Rica. The first inhabitants of this area used these artifacts for domestic, ritual and decorative purposes. Surviving to the present time, this form of cultural expression has largely preserved the handicraft production techniques of the pre-Columbian potters. Objects made include pots and jugs, clay flutes, mortars, large jars, vases, clay griddles, flowerpots and other products native to Mesoamerican groups. Pottery-making is part of the family and community context, and largely intended for sale to tourists.
Replicas of pre-Columbian artifacts using clay from the community of San Vicente de Nicoya belong to a range of pottery crafts of Chorotega indigenous origin mainly from the Guanacaste area in the north of Costa Rica. The first inhabitants of this area used these artifacts for domestic, ritual and decorative purposes. Surviving to the present time, this form of cultural expression has largely preserved the handicraft production techniques of the pre-Columbian potters. Objects made include pots and jugs, clay flutes, mortars, large jars, vases, clay griddles, flowerpots and other products native to Mesoamerican groups. Pottery-making is part of the family and community context, and largely intended for sale to tourists.

© 1999, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Dance

Children from the Guaymí community performing a dance.

Museo de los Niños

COSTA RICA
© Museo de los Niños, Costa Rica


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Describe some aspects of ancient Costa Rican culture, using artifacts as examples
  • Identify how some current Costa Rican practices relate to traditional cultural practices
  • Describe efforts of Costa Rican peoples to maintain their cultural traditions

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