There is no word for "art" in the Haida language. Art is integrated into the fabric of community life and sustained by the special resources of Haida Gwaii: cedar to carve poles, canoes and masks; cedar bark and spruce roots to make hats; and shells to adorn button blankets and masks.

Art is found in an intricate carving of an octopus on a fish hook or in a feast dish carved to represent a halibut. Art is one with ceremony when family crest poles are raised, masks are brought to life through dance, and button blankets bearing clan crests are worn
There is no word for "art" in the Haida language. Art is integrated into the fabric of community life and sustained by the special resources of Haida Gwaii: cedar to carve poles, canoes and masks; cedar bark and spruce roots to make hats; and shells to adorn button blankets and masks.

Art is found in an intricate carving of an octopus on a fish hook or in a feast dish carved to represent a halibut. Art is one with ceremony when family crest poles are raised, masks are brought to life through dance, and button blankets bearing clan crests are worn

© 1998, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Fish Hook

Haida halibut hook

Photo: Alberni Valley Museum

A137
© Alberni Valley Museum


Sea Grizzly

Sea Grizzly totem pole carved by Guujaaw.

carved by Guujaaw
Photo: Haida Gwaii Museum at Qay'llnagaay

© Haida Gwaii Museum at Qay'llnagaay


Bracelet

Haida silver bracelet; split grizzly bear design

carved by Charles Edenshaw
Royal British Columbia Museum

CPN 13028
© Royal British Columbia Museum


Dish

Carved halibut dish.

Photo: Canadian Museum of Civilization

VII-B1484
© Canadian Museum of Civilization


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Describe the importance of art to the Haida people
  • Describe elements of Haida art, using examples
  • Identify inspirations for Haida art
  • Recognize prominent works of Haida art, and the names of prominent Haida artists

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